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Author Topic: How does one record a fan riff?  (Read 1867 times)

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Offline Pak-Man

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How does one record a fan riff?
« on: April 25, 2008, 10:25:47 AM »
Me and Tyrant are thinking of getting into the fan riff biz, and we know how to write up our own script. What we don't know is how to actually record the script.

How do you make sure it all syncs up? What file formats are best to use? How do you record the riffs without background noise?Any tips or hints from  the experienced fan?


Offline RVR II

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Re: How does one record a fan riff?
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2008, 10:30:35 AM »
OOOooo... :o


Offline Tripe

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Re: How does one record a fan riff?
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2008, 10:31:00 AM »
yeah that would be interesting to know, plus it'd fit nicely in the index.


Offline David

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Re: How does one record a fan riff?
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2008, 10:33:03 AM »
When Riff Raff Theater recorded speed (coming soon), we basically had the DVD audio splitting out into three headphones for the three performers, and a microphone for each (one microphone for all is a possibility if it's set up right).

Then just watch the DVD and record away in one take so it synchs up right... the headphone audio should not leak into the microphone.
There will be mistakes. Re-record those lines afterwards.

And you need audio editing software like Audacity to fine tune it, add sync lines, and overwrite the flubs. Importing the audio from the DVD helps when you're trying to make the final product.


Offline JoshWay

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Re: How does one record a fan riff?
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2008, 10:57:56 AM »
My commentaries are delivered with video,  but they are still recorded separately so I can edit them. I use a timeline-based video application (Sony Vegas) and load the movie onto its own two tracks (one for video and one for audio) with a third empty track for my commentary. Then I watch the movie with a headset mic so I can hear the sound but it is not recorded. This is ideal for editing and even stopping and starting, which I do quite a bit of. It also allows me to adjust the volumes separately and after the fact. Then I export the whole mix as an MP4 and upload to YouTube, then export an MPEG stream for the eventual DVD.


Offline RVR II

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Re: How does one record a fan riff?
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2008, 11:05:09 AM »
Sounds similar to my Pinnacle Studio version 9.4.. It has a track to add audio from a mic.

I've never tried using that option.. Might have to give it a shot sometime :-\


Offline Tripe

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Re: How does one record a fan riff?
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2008, 11:06:27 AM »
Wait I thought you were doing the Dune riff.


Offline RVR II

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Re: How does one record a fan riff?
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2008, 11:09:19 AM »
Wait I thought you were doing the Dune riff.
I wrote the Script, but I don't have the knowledge to make an actual Riff file of the script.. :-[

BTA has connections to that part I believe..


Offline Tripe

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Re: How does one record a fan riff?
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2008, 11:11:00 AM »
Ah perfectly understandable, he's quite the producer really. :)


Offline Raven

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Re: How does one record a fan riff?
« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2008, 06:38:31 PM »
Mi first riff was just done using a 4 channel audio mixer and a simple dvd recorder running in real time.  I just split the audio from the movie to the left track and our commentary to the right ones so I could strip the movie audio out to make the MP3.  After a few runs through we replaced most of the mistakes and then I bought a Roland VS 880 Digital Recorder off ebay for about $100.00.  It's gonna make recording future riffs a whole lot easier. 

I'd suggest picking up a decent microphone first off.  We had 2 good ones and one not so good one and the result was really noticible.


Offline bettertomorrowamy

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Re: How does one record a fan riff?
« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2008, 07:38:52 AM »
Regarding the Dune riff, once I get enough jokes together I was gonna record it with a good mic by myself.  It would be cool to have riff submitters with good voices and good mics record jokes, and then I could mix their audio in with mine.  Not sure if this is feasible due to sound issues and mic differences.  If nothing else, I do plan on recording it myself with my own voice.
On timeout


Offline RoninFox

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Re: How does one record a fan riff?
« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2008, 10:28:42 PM »
My first riff I ended up recording the lines one at a time an inserting them into a track on Audacity according to time code, which was a huge pain in the ass and I would definitely not recommend it.

Since then I've been using/adapting the method Asbestos Bill posted here

I only use one computer, a USB headset for hearing the movie and one USB condenser microphone that any and all guests have to share (at least until I can afford to buy a second one)  There is going to be some background noise to deal with, but here are a few tips to minimize it and remove as much as possible.  These seem to work for me, but if anyone with more experience can add to or correct anything feel free.

1.  Obviously if you can, turn off anything that'll make such noise.  Turn off the heater/AC while recording, as well as any washers dryers dishwashers etc and make sure you tell anyone you might be sharing your house/apartment/flat/cardboard box with that you'll be recording and to keep it quiet.  You'll still have some noise to deal with, like the fans on the computer you're using, but you can at least minimize it.

2.  Set up the microphone(s) as far from the computer as you can while still being able to see everything you need to and reach the mouse/keyboard.  (If you have wireless controls, this is the time)  I end up putting the mic on top of my hamper, which is in turn put on top of a small table so it's just about head hight while standing.  If you prefer to sit, make sure the chairs don't make squeak or creak noises.  Stools would be optimal compared to office chairs.

3.  If you can, make a makeshift soundproof box.  Take the surface you're putting your microphone on and figure out how to surround it on all but one side with a box lined or covered with fabric, this'll absorb a lot of the sound in the room, except the sound coming from your direction.  I experimented with this last night with good results, using a plastic crate and covering it with my jacket.  Next time I set it up I'll try and get a picture as an example.

4.  The first thing you should do with your audio file after recording is normalize it.  Highlight the entire track and click normalize from the effects menu.  (If you're not using Audacity there should be something similar to this, if not then look for something that says it will remove or fix "DC Offset"  This will make sure your moments of silence will be centered on the zero line, making more seamless editing possible.

5.  If there's still a lot of background noise, then highlight a section of just the noise and go to effects again.  Click "Noise Removal" and in the menu click to get a "Noise Profile".  Once that's done, highlight the whole track and go back to "Noise Removal".  You can probably click OK and use the default removal settings and be happy with them, there's a preview button, but since your track is going to be long it doesn't give you much of a hint to what you're doing.  You should probably listen to a long stretch of the file after doing this to see how much effect it had and if you're not happy click  undo and try again.

I've been thinking about putting together a full guide for this, incorporating everything I use from other guides and personal experience into one resource (giving full credit where credit is due of course  ;) )  If I get around to it I'll post it here.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2008, 10:33:24 PM by RoninFox »
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