Author Topic: What was the last movie you watched?  (Read 1539745 times)

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Online The Lurker

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12975 on: July 14, 2013, 07:54:29 PM »
Currently watching A Christmas Story 2.  So far the acting is more hammy than the first one (especially the dad, played by Daniel Stern).  Also, there's one moment I'm not sure is accurate to the time period.  More when the movie is finished.

'Tis the season!
Considering how some networks love to do the "Christmas in July" thing, yeah.


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12976 on: July 14, 2013, 08:42:58 PM »
Is Festivus in July OK?  Aluminum poles are not really seasonal, right?

Sorry, reading the religion thread I've been picturing Kramer saying "it's a Festivus miracle".


Offline Raven

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12977 on: July 18, 2013, 09:57:37 PM »
Pitch Perfect - As formulaic as this movie was it was pretty funny and was worth watching just for Rebel Wilson

Dodge Ball - Really enjoy Vince Vaughn and hadn't watched this one in a while.  Only note that I'd like to give is that Lance Armstrong is even a bigger dick since his fraud allowed him to make cameo's like this one.. 


Offline Charles Castle

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12978 on: July 18, 2013, 10:33:38 PM »
During Akira Kurosawa's long eclipse during the 1970s, a period during which he made one film as an exile and made one suicide attempt, the director occupied himself with refining the designs and storyboards for two films he didn't know if he would ever make. At the time, he had only made two films in color, and one can imagine him beginning to burst at the possibilities of color that he might never get to realize on screen. The two films that eventually resulted from this long obsession play as if the director had taken a gun, put it in his mouth, and splattered both his disillusionment and his pent up ambitions onto the screen in eyeball-searing color.

There is a valedictory quality to Ran. There are so many disparate theatrical elements plucked from his long career and from his national cinema that it seems as if Kurosawa, in this one film, was trying to live up to the criticism that his career was like watching the history of Japanese cinema running in reverse. The theatricality of it is at odds with his early films, but of a piece with them, too. The theatricality of it was always there in films like Seven Samurai, but it was hidden, perhaps because they were in black and white. A great many of the shots in Ran seem decorated rather than composed, as if the director had spent years and years working and re-working them. The volume of Kurosawa's art from this period shows that this is indeed what happened. The director enlisted his friend, Ishiro Honda, to realize many of these pieces on screen, thus, perversely linking this particular apocalypse with the various catastrophes inflicted on Japan in Honda's kaiju films.

There are odd notes, from the androgynous Fool (the actor who plays him was in fact a noted female impersonator), to the grandly theatrical make-up worn by Tatsuya Nakadai, to a Tôru Takemitsu score that sounds like nothing Japanese at all and most resembles Jerry Goldsmith's Planet of the Apes score. This is a weirdly feminine movie, too. The aforementioned Fool is part of it, but the movie hinges on the two female characters, Lady Sue (Yoshiko Miyazaki) in the role of the murdered innocent and Lady Kaede (Mieko Harada) as a descendant of Lady Macbeth. Lady Sue has hardly any screen time, but the pivotal role of the murdered innocent is implacable in a Shakespearean tragedy. Lady Kaede, on the other hand, steals the entire movie from all comers, even the wildly overacting Nakadai. I categorize this all as odd because Kurosawa was never a filmmaker with much interest in women, and yet they dominate his valediction. All told, this assemblage of oddities has a mounting effect, like a top that begins with small wobbles spinning into wildly eccentric gyrations. It would be a mistake to think that this effect is an accident, because, after all, the title of the film translates literally as "Chaos."

Ran is a great movie, no doubt about it, but I'd forgotten just how much of a downer it is. Not all of that can be laid at the feet of William Shakespeare, either. The broad outlines of Lear are still there, though it changes Lear's daughters into sons and kinda sorta changes Richmond into Lady Kaeda, one of the cinema's most jaw-dropping monsters. Lear is already something of a total negation of life, in which even the villains are inconsequential in a godless void. Its dominant words are no, not, nothing, and (memorably) never never never never. And in spite of all this, Kurosawa goes it all one better. The last shot of the movie has a blind man teetering on the precipice of a ruined castle, having accidentally dropped an image of the Amida Buddha he had been given to keep him company. Rarely has a filmmaker ever matched himself so keenly to the material. Ran is Kurosawa howling in the wilderness.
You know, if the space man puma thing turns out to be the correct religion, I for one will be very surprised.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12979 on: July 18, 2013, 11:05:49 PM »
Pacific Rim

Went on about this in the Pacific Rim thread, but basically, it was a fun movie that was lacking in it's characters.  It has character, but it's characters don't have character.  But those fights scenes are pretty great.  It's halfway good but it had potential to be great.  Still, hopefully, the success of this will lead to Del Toro doing HP Lovecraft proper.


Offline lassieface

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12980 on: July 19, 2013, 04:28:59 PM »
Yeah, some of the characters in Pacific Rim felt like you needed to read a backstory first. And I just liked that I could tell what was happening in the fight scenes.


Offline Mrs. Dick Courier

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12981 on: July 19, 2013, 05:57:05 PM »
Gangster Squad

Went in knowing nothing except two words.  Ryan Gosling....sigh...

Enjoyed it.  Had Josh Brolin as a bonus.  He's awesome.  He even made Men in Black 3 watchable.  And Sean Penn is a great actor.  He plays a great bad guy.  Probably because he has a history of beating the shit out of people.
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Offline The Snape

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12982 on: July 19, 2013, 07:22:59 PM »
Monty Python's The Meaning of Life: Not their best, but still jettisoned me off the chair with uproarious laughter in the first and last shticks


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12983 on: July 19, 2013, 08:12:36 PM »
Brand Upon the Brain!

Very arty movie from Canadian art filmmaker Guy Maddin, who is known for weirdness.  It's also an intentionally silly movie, as well as sensual and unsettling.  Basically it's about an island of orphans controlled by the clearly insane mother of the main character (Guy Maddin.  No, Guy Maddin doesn't play the character, the character is Guy Maddin).  There is also a mad scientist father who has created a sort of spiritual walkie talkie everyone carries around, but is working on a more sinister experiment.  Meanwhile Wendy Hale comes to the island.  She's one of the famous brother-sister teen detective team "The Lightbulb Kids" and wants to figure out what's going on.  As she begins investigating, she falls in love with Guy's sister and disguises herself as her own brother (who, for all we know, doesn't exist) to figure out what the parents are up to and to get closer to Sis.

It's mostly silent with some narration by Isabella Rossallini (apparently when shown in theatres, they had a lot of live celebrity narrators, including Crispin Glover and poet John Ashbury.  I'm torn on it.  I can easily see why someone would hate it and why another person would love it.  I was put off at first by it's incredibly "flickery" editing style (the longest shots are about 5 seconds) and it's almost stereotypical pretensions.  It's also quite abrasive in parts, including a nasty story involving a pair of jealous twin sisters.  At the same time, it is often darkly funny and cartoonish and once the plot starts going (as messy as it is) it really gets interesting.  Maddin is good at dreamlike sensuality and those scenes play really well, and there's a sense of imagination that is very reminiscent of Jean-Pierre Jeunet (the City of Lost Children) but on a tight budget.  I think the latter half of the film would be a turn off to most, for what starts as a sensual version of the Bobsy Twins turns ugly as it goes on, as things begin to fall apart for our heroes.  It really is dreamlike in the way things play out and Maddin is able to make things unsettling without getting terribly graphic.  Probably hardest to watch is the evil mother's beyond Lucille Bluth mixed of cruel mothering and Oedipal nastiness, which is certainly not as unpleasant as graphic films that just punish the audience but is hard to watch nonetheless.

So, definitely not for everyone, but it is very well made and the story is good, though sort of too much wallowing in ugliness in the last 3 chapters for me to maintain my interest.  Still, I recommend it to fans of imaginative art films.

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12984 on: July 22, 2013, 11:24:11 PM »
 
Brand Upon the Brain!

I loved Maddin's "My Winnipeg" - it's surreal, funny, with narration that's read like Beatnik poetry. "Saddest Music in the World" was good too, but like you said with Brand, it does wallow in it's ugliness.

Andrei Rublev (1966)
It runs nearly 3 and a half hours and the first time I watched it, it absolutely defeated me. Tarkovsky’s slow, episodic and mostly invented look at the life of Russia’s great icon painter is a sweeping journey -- and one I found so challenging due to its fragmented narrative, that I was unable to follow it my first go through. Just as I was getting comfortable with one sequence, the movie would suddenly jump to another time and place. Sometimes Rublev wasn’t even present during an event. I admit it I was lost.

There were striking moments throughout the film: From the breathtaking opening scene with the balloon, to the haunting pagan sequence in the woods -- so I always knew I’d have to come back to it one day.

That day was yesterday. This time I familiarized myself with the historical backdrop and perused interviews with the director. And armed with this (and memories of my first viewing)... I watched - and the film clicked. I started to see the big picture; the pieces connected and became clearer to me. It still challenges, there are bits where I am still not sure what is going on – but the overall direction and camera work, the look and atmosphere – scenes of great beauty juxtaposed to horrific violence (the torture of the Priest was painful). All of it made for powerful and memorable viewing. There are images that linger long after the film ended.



Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12985 on: July 22, 2013, 11:38:54 PM »
Meatballs

Finally got around to watching this early Bill Murray work.  And while this definitely isn't a bad movie, it's really Murray's movie.  Outside of him, it isn't too funny outside of some Animal House style hijinks.  That said, there's a surprising amount of heart to the original sex camp comedy that so many of it's sequels and imitators.  Yes, there's the fat guy and a character named "Spazz", but there does seem to be genuine affection for them and while it isn't the funniest movie, it's sweetness makes up for a lot of it.  So comedy-wise, the only really good stuff is Murray tearing it up and his friendship with the young boy (and I will say the climactic race, though incredibly cliche, makes excellent use of sound by turning off the soundtrack and having us only hear the heavy footfalls and rustling of leaves), while the rest is... not bad, but lacking in energy.

The "it just doesn't matter" speech is pretty great, too.

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Offline Pak-Man

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12986 on: July 26, 2013, 07:11:26 PM »
Finally went to see Pacific Rim. It's like my brain was saying, "Well this story is kind of telegraphed and predictable and OH MY GOSH THAT ROBOT JUST HIT THAT MONSTER WITH A BATTLESHIP THAT WAS AWESOME!"

It was a darn good time. Reminds me of Independance Day in a good way.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12987 on: July 26, 2013, 07:19:02 PM »
Rewatched Rango.  It has a number of small flaws (the main character feels poorly defined outside of some quirks that don't entirely coalesce properly.  Also, there are a lot of weak and well-worn gags in it.  But it has some amazing action set pieces and it overcomes it's weaknesses with an overwhelming sense of fun.  It's a shame that Gore Verbinski really dropped the ball with the Lone Ranger, since if I heard he was doing that after seeing this, I would have been really excited.


Offline Nunyerbiz

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12988 on: July 26, 2013, 09:45:25 PM »
Pitch Perfect - As formulaic as this movie was it was pretty funny and was worth watching just for Rebel Wilson

I was surprised how much I liked this one. Rolled my eyes at my wife when she picked it from the on demand menu... Byt hey, nothing wrong with a well-executed formula movie, that's better then Hollywood can muster most of the time.

Hansel and Gretel Blow Shit Up or Ripoff 'Blade' or Something

Reading a random IMDB user review a few minutes after watching this one... and I stumble on this gem... "This movie was written with a crayon and directed with a circus mallet." ... Yea, that just about sums it up. It's a really dumb movie... But it has lots of gore and CGI and action... a few funny one liners... Famke Jansen plays a great villain. It has some things going for it... Flies by in less than 90 minutes... geez, what am I saying... this is what we've become as a society... where I'm not outraged that I just spent 88 minutes watching Hansel and fucking Gretel hunt witches.... I need to read more or take up crochet or something.


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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12989 on: July 27, 2013, 01:58:43 AM »
Hansel and Gretel Blow Shit Up or Ripoff 'Blade' or Something

Reading a random IMDB user review a few minutes after watching this one... and I stumble on this gem... "This movie was written with a crayon and directed with a circus mallet." ... Yea, that just about sums it up. It's a really dumb movie... But it has lots of gore and CGI and action... a few funny one liners... Famke Jansen plays a great villain. It has some things going for it... Flies by in less than 90 minutes... geez, what am I saying... this is what we've become as a society... where I'm not outraged that I just spent 88 minutes watching Hansel and fucking Gretel hunt witches.... I need to read more or take up crochet or something.

Watched that last night myself. While I agree it's not great, I found myself entertained. Then again, I'm entertained by the Resident Evil movies, so take that as you will.