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Author Topic: What was the last movie you watched?  (Read 1586138 times)

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Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12945 on: July 09, 2013, 06:21:33 PM »
I fart on your character development.

Careful - That builds character.
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Offline Tripe

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12946 on: July 09, 2013, 08:32:19 PM »
I would point out I didn't actually state an opinion on what makes a story good or otherwise, I merely pointed out that there is at least one pretty famous narrative theorist that would disagree with this:

Story =/= character growth.

:)

Poirot equally does change over the course of the stories, hell she even offs him eventually, and this is Christie, somebody who is the queen of never changing settings and characters.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12947 on: July 09, 2013, 08:37:28 PM »
Last couple weeks of school, so I'm watching the first 45 minutes of Toy Story 3 again and again with different classes.  Still great, but 3 days in I'm playing Angry Birds while the kids enjoy it.

A lot of the students are really invested in Barbie's relationship.

I'm also sort of saddened by my student's inability to appreciate Michael Keaton's hilariously menacing line read of "take him to the libary!"


Offline anais.butterfly

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12948 on: July 09, 2013, 09:01:28 PM »
Wait, Odysseus didn't grow and develop as a character? I call Bullshit on that.

but, it's all just opinion anyway, so who cares.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2013, 09:07:21 PM by anais.butterfly »
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Online MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12949 on: July 09, 2013, 09:27:51 PM »
Just thought of another series to go along with Mission Impossible, Columbo.  I don't think that character changes at all from 1968 to 2003.  Only change is Falk getting older and slowing down...  Usually the only character development in those stories was the bad guy realizing that Columbo wasn't an idiot when they are being arrested.


Online Pak-Man

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12950 on: July 09, 2013, 09:32:16 PM »
Let me backpedal a teeny bit and say that character development is A litmus test to show that the story was worth something. There are other ways to show the story meant something. It's conflict resolution that's ultimately necessary for a story, but the hero doesn't always have to grow to get there. It's more satisfying when the character DOES grow, but I can't spend my childhood consuming Saturday Morning Cartoons and pretend there weren't any stories being told.

It might be more accurate to say that a story doesn't need character development, but character development needs a story. A short story:

Mr. Jones hated the color red.
One day, Mr. Jones decided he loved the color red.

The End

There isn't any way to read that and accept that Mr. Jones changed with no reason. The reader wants to know the story. So character development is one way to drive the story and provide satisfying resolution, and it seems the most satisfying in this day and age, but it's not the only way to get there.


Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12951 on: July 09, 2013, 09:35:14 PM »
...

Mr. Jones hated the color red.
One day, Mr. Jones decided he loved the color red.

The End

There isn't any way to read that and accept that Mr. Jones changed with no reason. The reader wants to know the story...

That story? ... Not really. ;P
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Offline Darth Geek

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12952 on: July 09, 2013, 09:37:19 PM »
Falk played Columbo since 68?! Holy shit!



Offline Tripe

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12953 on: July 10, 2013, 03:17:47 AM »
Colombo while being the constsnt in the series really fulfils a different role in the stories than that of hero, primarily because each episode is a replay of Crime and Punishment. Crime dramas tend to show us a different sort of protrusion of character; one that runs from their being at the height of their power to the collapse of same.

And yes Odysseus doesn't really change, in Homer, in other tellings off his story he tends too, which is where I'd imagine Anais has encountered him.


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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12954 on: July 10, 2013, 08:29:25 AM »
Falk played Columbo since 68?! Holy shit!

I looked up the character for the dates, forgot there were a few other versions of Columbo before Falk.

So it was Falk from 1971 to 2003.  Suchet has played Poirot almost as many years, but probably won't catch him, I don't think there are that many stories left for him to do.  Only other actor I can think of able to come back as the same character for longer is Nimoy as Spock.


Offline anais.butterfly

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12955 on: July 10, 2013, 12:57:02 PM »

And yes Odysseus doesn't really change, in Homer, in other tellings off his story he tends too, which is where I'd imagine Anais has encountered him.

Thanks for the douchey assumption that I have never read Homer
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Offline Tripe

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12956 on: July 10, 2013, 01:11:10 PM »
And yes Odysseus doesn't really change, in Homer, in other tellings off his story he tends too, which is where I'd imagine Anais has encountered him.
Thanks for the douchey assumption that I have never read Homer
First off, calm down with the assumptions yourself.

Few people read Homer, there's no shame in that, it's not all that interesting stuff unless one is of a particular bent since it's a pretty different approach to story telling, you also were surprised that Odysseus doesn't go through the changes you assumed he did,

Wait, Odysseus didn't grow and develop as a character? I call Bullshit on that.

evidence there would suggest that you had not read the Homeric version of him. There are however many other retellings of the Odyssey and most if not all of those do indeed show some sort of  character development in them (a good example is Odysseus The Greatest Hero of them All performed by Tony Robinson though not, I don't think, written by him).

So, rather than snap at me when I'm actually explaining why you might have been surprised take a few deep breaths and, like I said, calm down: not everyone is trying to belittle or put you down and you do yourself and those who are actually fond of you a disservice when you assume they are.  >:(
« Last Edit: July 10, 2013, 01:18:55 PM by Tripe H. Redux »


Offline Charles Castle

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12957 on: July 10, 2013, 02:34:26 PM »
The Boondock Saints (1999, Directed by Troy Duffy) gave the educated Northern equivalents of rednecks a place in the heavens. They cut through unnecessary foolishness like political correctness and civil rights to do what those ACLU-befuddled pansies could not, namely, rid the world of crime. They decide for themselves who are guilty and execute them, saving the state money and time while making the world safe for all the good people accidentally blowing up cats, punching lesbians, and belittling prostitutes. The writer director Troy Duffy tries to present this fantasy for bigoted males as a disturbing choice between a passive acceptance of criminal survival & forced politically correct behavior, and vigilante justice righting all these insufferable wrongs. Unfortunately, he supports a worse and more tiresome judgment, namely, that there is a fixed moral definition of good and evil that benefits everyone equally. All hail the status quo; if it was good enough for grandpa, it is good enough for me.

I followed up my viewing of Boondock Saints by watching Overnight (2003, Directed by Tony Montana & Mark Brian Smith) which chronicles the period of time beginning with Miramax's purchase of Duffy's script for The Boondock Saints up to it's very limited theatrical run. While I recognize that the film's aim is to present Duffy in a negative light -- Duffy, Montana and Smith were partners in the documentary and in other pursuits, until the relationship went sour because, among other things, Duffy refused to pay them for services rendered (and in one scene belittles them about how they will not get the money he owes them, even though he has the money available... or so he claims) -- there is plenty here to confirm my expectation going in that the person responsible for making something like The Boondock Saints is a pretty repulsive creep.

Hardly essential from a cinematic standpoint, but interesting nonetheless, to see a person go down in flames after receiving a probably unearned opportunity of many lifetimes from the power brokers above.

************

Having never watched The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964, Directed by Jacques Demy) I've always held the impression that this this famous French musical of the '60s was some kind of kitschy pastel Franco-mod attempt to ape MGM, but instead I discovered a remarkably nuanced and totally disarming opera that deals with a real-life situations in a way I found emotionally honest. Catherine Deneuve and Nino Castelnuovo are captivating as young lovers separated by war, and the tough adult decisions that need to be made under hard circumstances. Remarkably, this may be the closest we'll ever get to a musical directed by Douglas Sirk or Robert Bresson -- the oversaturated interior colors that seem to compensate for the drabness of lives lived within them is unmistakably Sirk, while the rigid, deadpan performances of the actors are indebted to Bresson -- an inspired approach, in that it makes the singing of the characters even more of an unrestrained expression from within their inexpessive faces. But above all the trembling sense of compassion for people getting by as best they can is completely the contribution of Jacques Demy. The music is a revelation in that it somehow catches the inflections of everyday speech, while building to the requisite dramatic climaxes with gusto. Unquestionably a masterpiece.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2013, 02:41:51 PM by Charles Hussein Castle »
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Offline mrbasehart

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12958 on: July 10, 2013, 05:38:43 PM »

Having never watched The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964, Directed by Jacques Demy) I've always held the impression that this this famous French musical of the '60s was some kind of kitschy pastel Franco-mod attempt to ape MGM, but instead I discovered a remarkably nuanced and totally disarming opera that deals with a real-life situations in a way I found emotionally honest. Catherine Deneuve and Nino Castelnuovo are captivating as young lovers separated by war, and the tough adult decisions that need to be made under hard circumstances. Remarkably, this may be the closest we'll ever get to a musical directed by Douglas Sirk or Robert Bresson -- the oversaturated interior colors that seem to compensate for the drabness of lives lived within them is unmistakably Sirk, while the rigid, deadpan performances of the actors are indebted to Bresson -- an inspired approach, in that it makes the singing of the characters even more of an unrestrained expression from within their inexpessive faces. But above all the trembling sense of compassion for people getting by as best they can is completely the contribution of Jacques Demy. The music is a revelation in that it somehow catches the inflections of everyday speech, while building to the requisite dramatic climaxes with gusto. Unquestionably a masterpiece.

Loved it.  Young Girls of Rochefort, which co-stars Gene Kelly is also amazing.  Much, much lighter though.


Offline Tripe

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12959 on: July 11, 2013, 07:18:59 AM »
a good example is Odysseus The Greatest Hero of them All performed by Tony Robinson though not, I don't think, written by him
Looked it up partially by him in collaboration with Richard Curtis, it really is good stuff if you can track it down. :)

Folds in a wee bit of Robert Graves as a narrative device but still lots of fun as long as that doesn't bother you.