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Offline stethacantus

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17475 on: September 25, 2017, 12:26:19 AM »
The Adventures of Tintin ( 2011 )
It seems that JJ Abrams' tribute film to Steven Spielberg, Super 8, was some sort of motivator. Because six months later Spielberg had not just one, but two movies he directed being released the same week. This was unbelievable, even by Spielberg's standards. The closest he came was releasing Poltergeist and E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial a week apart in 1982, and as you remember, he was not credited as director on Poltergeist. And that year he was working on no other films. In 2011 he was producing Transformers: Dark of the Moon, Cowboys and Aliens, and Men in Black 3, which he may not have been as involved with as the films he produced in the 80s, but all had enough expensive effects scenes that Spielberg as producer would need to approve. Add to that him producing Terra Nova for FOX and the first season of Falling Skies for TBS. And there was also Super 8, which Abrams brought in Spielberg as a collaborator, and he even found the time to record a voice cameo for Paul, which was yet another Spielberg tribute film released that same year, although not through his production company. Two tribute films in the same year would seem like enough of a motivator for a director to direct two films back to back. But actually, the reason why The Adventures of Tintin and War Horse ended up released the same week was not because they were filmed the same year. Spielberg had actually finished filming Tintin back in 2009, and it ended up taking another two years to complete the CGI animation.

Tintin was created by French cartoonist Hergé ( pen name of Georges Remi ) in a series of 24 graphic novels published between 1929 and 1983. He was an investigative journalist who goes on adventures with his dog Snowy. Tintin became an instant success in France, and soon became popular all over Europe as it was translated from French into various languages, including English. However, it failed to catch on in the United States. In 1957 a French animated cartoon series was made based on many of the books and broken up into five minute chapters. It was inevitably reedited and dubbed into English for America. As a very young child I recall seeing the show on television. I am going to assume it got the same treatment in American syndication as did the Japanese anime, with a lot of content cut which was considered unsuitable for American children, often replaced with poorly animated scenes and altered dubbing. It disappeared from syndication in the 70s, and to the best of my knowledge, has not aired in the United States since then. ( Another Tintin cartoon series made in the 90s was translated and aired, I presume uncut, on HBO, then later on Nickelodeon. Although this new series was said to have been toned down from the original content in the graphic novels, this was also about the time Nickelodeon was self censoring their own Ren & Stimpy Show for content they had originally approved. )  There were a few other attempts to introduce Tintin to the American public, resulting in reprint books that you could only find hidden in the back shelves of comic book stores. But for the longest time it seemed as if Americans simply did not like Tintin they way the rest of the world did. The closest Tintin came to mainstream popularity was when the new wave band Thompson Twins had a string of top 40 hits in America ( including three top ten hits. ) The band, which was actually a trio at the time, was named after the characters Thomson & Thompson,  a pair of bumbling detectives from the Tintin comics who although appearing to be identical, are not actually related. Whenever it was asked in interviews why the trio would call themselves twins, they would mention that their band was named after the Tintin characters.

For the next three decades most Americans would only know of Tintin as a bit of trivia from an 80s new wave band who's final top 40 hit was in 1989. It could have been different, because in the 80s Steven Spielberg almost made an Adventures of Tintin film. While Indiana Jones had been inspired by the action and adventure in the James Bond films, as well as the old movie serials from the 30s and 40s, foreign reviewers instead compared Raiders of the Lost Ark to the Tintin comics. Spielberg became intrigued, and began reading the English language translations, after which he became a huge fan of the comic. Meanwhile, there had been a few live action Tintin films made in France which Hergé did not like, which was why he eventually stopped licencing the comic for films.  After seeing Raiders of the Lost Ark, Hergé became convinced that Steven Spielberg was the only director who could possibly make a Tintin film that was true to the comic. Eventually a meeting was arranged between Hergé and Spielberg to make a live action adaption of the comics which Spielberg thought of as Indiana Jones for younger children ( By that time Lucas had already decided Indiana Jones would be darker,  resulting in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom which would later cause the MPAA to create the PG-13 rating. ) But days before the meeting, Hergé suffered a heart attack. After a week in the hospital Hergé died. His widow later contacted Spielberg and offered him the film option for Tintin as one of her husband's dying wishes. Spielberg asked Melissa Mathison, who had written the script for E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial to write a script for a Tintin movie. But he was not happy with the script that Mathison delivered. At the time he was in the midst of trying to reinvent himself with films like The Color Purple and Empire of the Sun, and was committed to directing the third Indiana Jones film which Paramount wanted by the summer of 1989. So he allowed the option to lapse. By the 90s Spielberg was no longer interested in adapting Tintin.

For another decade various film makers made offers to Hergé's widow for the film rights to Tintin, but all were turned down. Finally in 2002 Spielberg decided again he wanted to make a Tintin film, and easily acquired the film rights again. He had approached Peter Jackson's company Weta Digital about the possibility of making a CGI Snowy instead of using a real dog in the movie. Jackson, who was also a fan of the comics, talked Spielberg into making the entire film in CGI so that all the characters could look like those of Hergé. Spielberg himself soon realized that CGI could allow him to create fantastic action scenes that could never be accomplished using real actors, stuntmen and sets. Jackson shot test footage of him and Andy Serkis in motion capture suits which was turned into animation of Tintin and Captain Haddock. Spielberg was impresses, and by 2007 the film was officially announced as in production with Spielberg as director and Jackson as producer. The plan was for three films with Jackson directing the sequel with Spielberg producing, and both co-directing the third film. Spielberg had already hired Steven Moffat to write the script. While he completed the first draft, he was unable to write the second draft due to a strike by the Writers Guild of America. Before the strike was over, Moffat was offered the job as producer and show runner for Doctor Who, leaving the Tintin project with the permission of Spielberg and Jackson ( who were also both Doctor Who fans ) Other writers were hired to complete the script. Another delay happened when Universal decided to cancel the film after two other entirely CGI animated films, Monster House ( 2006 ) and Beowulf ( 2007 ) bombed at the box office. The distributor Paramount Pictures agreed to continue financing the film, but Spielberg would need to find a new studio before principal photography could begin. Eventually Columbia Pictures agreed to do two of the Tintin films. Principal photography finally took place in 2009, however, the animation would take two years to complete.

The Adventures of Tintin is a wonderful adventure film, but despite reviewers comparing it to the Indiana Jones films, does not have nearly as much action scenes. In fact, the action scenes are probably it's biggest flaw. Thanks to the computer animation, they come off as like watching a modern video game. Often during an action scene the camera ( if you can call it that ) looses track of a character, and I ended up rewinding the disc quite a few times to see how a character got from point A to point B. It is also a bit anticlimatic. You had hoped the film was building to something, like the MacGuffin both Tintin and the villains had been hunting for all through the film would have turned out to be a dangerous magical artifact, or some sort of advanced weapon, rather than just a stash of hidden treasure. Perhaps the worst thing about this film is that although Spielberg had directed the actors, it was all done on a motion capture stage and all replaced with animated CGI characters and sets.  There was nothing left of Spielberg in this film. Anyone could have directed it, and it would have ended up looking exactly the same. Those complaints aside, it does work as a mystery adventure film. But it is nowhere as good as the Indiana Jones films.


Mortal Kombat ( 1995 )
The original Mortal Kombat arcade game began as a film tie-in to Jean-Claude Van Damme film Bloodsport ( 1988 ) which Van Damme himself would agree to have himself photographed and used as the main character. Midway was eager to compete against Capcom's upcoming release of Street Fighter II and wanted their own tournament fighter game, but with the photo realism of Pit Fighter, the celebrity of Jean-Claude Van Damme, and plenty of blood and gore. The deal fell through ( it is still unclear if Midway was unable to obtain the film rights to Bloodsport, or if it was Van Damme who backed out of the deal. ) and the games developers were forced to produce a fighting game that was not based on a Van Damme film. Continuing with the concept of a fighting game based on popular martial arts films, they began creating characters that closely resembled, but for legal purposes, did not resemble too closely, characters and actors from other popular martial arts films. For example, Liu Kang resembled and acted like Bruce Lee, while Johnny Cage was meant to be a parody of Van Damme. ( Ironically, Van Damme would later star in the film adaption of Street Fighter. ) The character of Raiden seemed to be based on Thunder from Big Trouble in Little China. While Sonya Blade seemed to be a deliberate ripoff of Cammy from Street Fighter II. Even the name Mortal Kombat was very similar to the American name of the popular Shaw Brothers film Crippled Avengers, which at the time was still being shown on television as part of the syndicated Black Belt Theater under the title Mortal Combat. That film title was exclusively copyrighted to World Northal Films, which is probably why Midway decided to change the spelling from "Combat" to "Kombat" with a "K". At the time, World Northal had already fallen into bankruptcy, and the North American copyright to that film title has since become questionable. Which is why when Celestial Films restored the film, they chose to retitled it Return of the Five Deadly Venoms because their lawyers could not figure out who owned the film title copyright to "Mortal Combat" in 2010.

Three years after the original Mortal Kombat hit the arcades, the rights were acquired by New Line so it could be adapted as a major motion picture. At the same time Universal had acquired the rights to the Street Fighter video game. While in retrospect adapting an arcade fighting game into a movie is almost as dumb as adapting Battleship into a movie, a lot of A list hollywood stars auditioned for both films. Cameron Diaz, who had just become a major star in her debut film  The Mask ( 1994 ), turned down a lot of offers so she could play Sonya. With just a week to go before principal photography began, Cameron shattered her wrist while taking martial arts training for the film. Last minute casting scrambling resulted in the part going to former Teen USA winner and then soap opera star Bridgette Wilson. Another casting change was the role of Johnny Cage, which was first offered to Brandon Lee shortly before his death, who apparently wanted to take the role. It was then offered to Jean-Claude Van Damme, the actor the character was based on. Unfortunately he had just accepted the role of Guile in the Street Fighter film. The part ended up going to Linden Ashby. Christopher Lambert took the role of Raiden. The lead role of Liu Kang went to international action star Robin Shou, who also ended up choreographing the fight scenes. Not only was Robin one of the few cast members to return for the sequel, but would go on to also star in two other films based on fighting arcade games, DOA: Dead or Alive ( 2006 ) and Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li ( 2009 ).

As expected, Mortal Kombat is a dog of a film. The dialogue is stupid. The effects often look like really bad CGI. The sets are limited and often cheap. The acting is better than it deserves to be, but that is about the best complament I can give this film. Of course, what I came to see was the fights. But even with choreography by Robin Shou, the fights are forgettable. At least he did away with that pausing that you got in a lot of American martial arts films up to this point. But there was no structure to the choreography. Most of the punches and kicks were identical from fight to fight. And every time one character struck another, it would be in a separate edit. So basically, in a fight where Liu Kang kicked an opponent, you would see him approach the opponent, then a cut to less than two seconds of footage where his foot makes contact with the opponent, then another cut to show the opponent falling back from the kick. Mortal Kombat may have been an amazing step forward in choreography in American martial arts films, but it was still way behind even the choreography in the 60s Hong Kong martial art films. Of course the whole identity of the Mortal Kombat games was the blood and gore, none of which makes it to this movie. And none of the graphic fatalities are here. This is more like the tame version of Mortal Kombat released on the Nintendo systems than the violent version that made it a hit in the arcades. And the worst part, they totally omitted the character of Toasty!! While Mortal Kombat is nowhere as bad as Street Fighter ( 1994 ), it is still very bad. It did result in a great soundtrack album though.

 



Beer League ( 2006 )
In 2000 comedian Artie Lange wrote and starred in a short film called Gameday about four members of a New Jersey minor league softball team who end up waiting at the wrong field while the rest of the team ( who we never see ) are at the right field and end up forfeiting the game. A very thin plot, even for a film that only lasts twenty minutes. The majority of which was just Artie and the other team members hurling insults at each other. As far as I can tell, Gameday was shot as an extra for Lange's concert DVD It's The Whiskey Talking, although was possibly shown to audiences before his stand up routine at select clubs. It wasn't much of a film, and not really that funny. Or to be more specific,  just as funny as when you and a group of friends got together on a stoop and did nothing more than insult each other for 20 minutes. And yet Frank Sebastiano saw this film and decided it could be the basis of a full feature film.

Frank Sebastiano was a writer on Saturday Night Live who had been fired around the same time Norm MacDonald was. At the time Norm had become close friends with Artie Lange who had himself been fired from Mad TV. Frank co-wrote the original script for Dirty Work, writing the part of Norm's best friend for Artie. A year later when Norm MacDonald was offered his own sitcom by ABC, he made sure that Artie was cast as his brother, and Sebastiano was the show runner. When Norm's sitcom was cancelled after it's third season, Artie found himself in the running as a cast member of The Howard Stern Show. It was a bit of a lucky break. Long time show member Jackie Martling left the show under bad advice by his manager who though he could get Martling a better deal on his contract. Howard had always wanted to add new cast members to his morning show, but had always been told by his station there was no money in the budget for a new employee. Once the station decided not to renew Martling's contract, Howard used the opportunity to hire a new cast member by asking everyone he wanted to take the spot to compete for the "Jackie Chair". Each contestant was invited to the studio for a day to audition as the new Jackie. Had this happened a month earlier, Artie would have turned down the offer, believing he still had a job on a sitcom.  Another bit of luck, all of the other contestants either decided they did not like getting up that early for the show, or screwed up ( one contestant ran into the back office and punched out show regular Stuttering John for calling in and joking about his wife, while another contestant was on the show during 9-11 and continued to attempt jokes after the first plane crash was announced. )  Both by default, and acing his audition, Artie won the Jackie chair, becoming the newest cast member of America's top rated radio show. At some point he expressed interest in turning his Gameday short into a feature film, and Frank Sebastiano ( who was a writer on Letterman at the time ) offered to co-write, produce and direct the film. Both Michael Deeg and Jimmy Palumbo who co-produced the short and starred as two of Artie's team mates were offered roles as team mates in Beer League

Beer league expands on the Gameday short by throwing in a lot of cliche screwball comedy plotlines. Artie cant get along with the captain of a rival softball team, which always results in a bench clearing brawl every time they play each other. After their latest brawl, the police chief announces that whichever team wins that year's championship will be allowed to return the net season. The loosing team would be forced to leave the league. Of course the rival team is a bunch of rich assholes who have won the championship every year for the past ten years, while Artie's team always comes in dead last. Halfway through the season Artie's team has yet to have a win, while the rivals are unbeaten. That is until Artie suggests that they actually start practicing. While it is impossible to catch up to the rival team, it was still possible to end the year in second place so they could face the rivals in the championship. And in true sports film fashion, both teams make it into the championship game, which all comes down to a single run. Beer League is not a bad film, but it is far from good. There are a lot of parts that work and have you laughing, but far more parts that just fail, making it no better or worse than Dirty Work. Both films could have been a lot better, and deserved to be a lot better. If only Sebastiano had put as much work in his feature films as he did in The Norm Show. There he was able to come up with week after week of funny sitcom material. Too bad that creativity failed to translate to his feature films.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17476 on: September 25, 2017, 05:49:43 AM »
I really do think The Adventures of Tintin is an underrated film.  I had one of my best theatre going experiences in a long time watching it, in a constant state of giddiness and I'm not even that much of a Tintin fan (though I appreciate its genius and innovation, especially the two part moon arc, which is a big high point.)  I also think that it brilliantly overcomes the animation issues that plagued the similarly animated films of Robert Zemeckis, thanks in large part to the characters still having exaggerated features, negating the uncanny valley effect.  Which is weird, because there were a couple times I caught myself and had to remember that this was animated.


Offline Pastor of Muppets

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17477 on: September 25, 2017, 07:21:14 AM »
This is Spinal Tap is pretty damn good. My favorite moment is when the little Stonehenge monument is lowered onstage and then Dwarves start dancing around it. That was brilliant.

I love the subtle joke on the IMDB page for that movie (hint: look at its star rating).
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Offline Pak-Man

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17478 on: September 25, 2017, 01:04:04 PM »
Tyrant's friend was visiting from out of state for the weekend, so I took the squirt out to see Lego Ninjago to get him out of their hair for a few hours.

It suffers from being an adaptation of a TV show. There were definite Lego Movie style moments, and some good gags that worked really well, but everything seemed much too subdued and formulaic because it was also trying to respect its less-frenetic (I assume. Never watched the Cartoon Network show.) source material. So it's a movie that works half the time. There are worse movies to take a kid to, but it's not worth seeking out.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2017, 04:16:27 PM by Pak-Man »


Offline wihogfan

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17479 on: September 25, 2017, 02:42:06 PM »
Kim Dotcom Caught in the Web
Thought it was a fair assessment of the subject. Things I learned that I had to go and verify from other sources before believing- the initial report of the reason an armed force was needed to apprehend Kim at his house was because he was armed and was cuaght hiding with with loaded sawed off shotgun was total made up BS that was finally admitted as BS in court. Several of the more damning emails that were reported were mis-translated.


Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17480 on: September 26, 2017, 10:02:23 PM »
This is Spinal Tap is pretty damn good. My favorite moment is when the little Stonehenge monument is lowered onstage and then Dwarves start dancing around it. That was brilliant.

I love the subtle joke on the IMDB page for that movie (hint: look at its star rating).
HAH!!! That's pretty good. Somebody on the IMDB staff deserves a gold star for that.


Offline Jesse412

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17481 on: September 27, 2017, 01:45:21 PM »
The Ring (2002)



I generally avoid American remakes of J-horror films and I haven't watched this one before but have been meaning to see it back-to-back with the original for some time and I'm glad I finally got around to doing so.  For some reason I didn't think this was as creepy as the original but I felt it was a pretty faithful adaptation with slightly more exposition and a few minor differences.  The special effects hold up relatively well and overall it was entertaining.  While I wouldn't recommend it over the original I do think it makes for an interesting companion piece.

Ringu (1998)



Just as scary today as it ever was and I rank it in my top 10 favorite J-horror films.  The chilling mood and atmosphere work incredibly well throughout.

Directly comparing both movies the special effects in the remake are mostly superior which is to be expected as it's not only the second attempt but also had the bigger budget.  Although the practical special effects in the original look infinitely better during the final well scene than the CGI used in the remake.  Both films had some decent casting with Naomi Watts doing pretty well as the lead in the remake and Hiroyuki Sanada in the supporting role in the original.  I did have a harder time rooting for the main characters in the remake for whatever reason.  The stories play out a little differently with some characters in the original having psychic abilities which is an element completely missing from the remake.  I feel that adds another level of supernatural to the story where the remake used mental illness and abuse grounding it more in reality.
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Offline Jesse412

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17482 on: September 27, 2017, 01:54:40 PM »
The Sword and the Sorcerer (1982)



Low budget fantasy b-movie that at times feels bland and generic by modern standards.  There's a little bad acting but also a few exciting action scenes, lots of swashbuckling and a bit of fan service.  The practical special effects makeups were very well crafted and for me were the highlight of the film.  A warlord resurrects a demon to help him overthrow his rival kingdom then betrays and kills the demon who vows revenge.  Years later the rightful heirs to the kingdom now grown are captured attempting to start a rebellion which leads to an epic rescue sequence and battle as well as a final confrontation with the demon.
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Offline Jesse412

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17483 on: September 27, 2017, 02:10:06 PM »
Asylum (1972)



Horror anthology where the inmates at a mental asylum each tell a story.  Probably most notable for its script by Robert Bloch and being one of a handful of anthologies produced by Amicus during the time.  It's a bit of cheesy fun that starts off slow but I think gets a little better as it goes along.  The first story involves a murderous husband who is haunted by the severed body parts of his dead wife.  In the second story Peter Cushing plays an occultist who hires a tailor to make a suit that will help resurrect his dead son. The third story is about a woman whose split personality kills people and features the lovely Britt Ekland.  In the final story a man is able to project his consciousness into a miniature doll.  The film ends with a twist that people may not see coming.

Horror anthology where the inmates at a mental asylum each tell a story.  Probably most notable for its script by Robert Bloch and being one of a handful of anthologies produced by Amicus during the time.  It's a bit of cheesy fun that starts off slow but I think gets a little better as it goes along.  The first story involves a murderous husband who is haunted by the severed body parts of his dead wife.  In the second story Peter Cushing plays an occultist who hires a tailor to make a suit that will help resurrect his dead son. The third story is about a woman whose split personality kills people and features the lovely Britt Ekland.  In the final story a man is able to project his consciousness into a miniature doll.  The film ends with a twist that people may not see coming.

Some other anthology films produced by Amicus that are worth checking out:

Torture Garden(1967) also scripted by Robet Bloch
Tales from the Crypt (1972)
The House That Dripped Blood (1971) also scripted by Robert Bloch
The Vault of Horror (1973)
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Offline Jesse412

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17484 on: September 27, 2017, 02:26:19 PM »
Bakko Yokaiden Kibakichi (2004)

Low budget supernatural samurai film that makes use of lots of campy practical special effects makeups. A ronin who is also a werewolf comes across a mob boss who uses a gambling racket to feed indebted gamblers to demons.  He also feuds with his estranged sister who blames his trust in humans for the deaths of their family.  He learns the Yokai have raised a human woman who was abandoned as a child and decides to defend them when they are attacked by a group of humans with a Gatling gun.  There's a lots of over-the-top action and a little gore throughout and the ending is nothing short of a massacre.  Not sure if I will check out the sequel yet though.
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Offline Pastor of Muppets

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17485 on: September 29, 2017, 09:16:29 AM »
The Sword and the Sorcerer (1982)

Low budget fantasy b-movie that at times feels bland and generic by modern standards.  There's a little bad acting but also a few exciting action scenes, lots of swashbuckling and a bit of fan service.  The practical special effects makeups were very well crafted and for me were the highlight of the film.  A warlord resurrects a demon to help him overthrow his rival kingdom then betrays and kills the demon who vows revenge.  Years later the rightful heirs to the kingdom now grown are captured attempting to start a rebellion which leads to an epic rescue sequence and battle as well as a final confrontation with the demon.

Watched it straight up?  There's a Rifftrax for that one.  It was the last one I watched before my long break from Rifftrax.  But you probably knew that already.  I mean about the existence of the Rifftrax, not how it related to me.
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Offline BathTub

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17486 on: September 30, 2017, 12:28:43 AM »
Incendies Holy Fuck. Denis Villeneuve has to be one of the most intense directors working at the moment. I love going into his films knowing nothing because they are a hell of ride. Bring on Bladerunner!


Offline Jesse412

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17487 on: September 30, 2017, 08:01:01 AM »
Mirrors (2008)



I haven't watched the original J-horror version and honestly wasn't going to check out this remake because the ratings On Demand were pretty low but it ended up being much better than I was expecting. Kiefer Sutherland gives a decent performance as a disgraced detective going through a mental breakdown while being haunted by an ominous force that uses mirrors to kill people. I often enjoy horror movies that can make you question whether the danger is actually supernatural or merely psychological and I felt this initially gave me that impression. It's suspenseful and eerie throughout and the ending is climactic with an interesting twist. I thought the use of practical special effects and CGI worked well and I'm looking forward to seeing the original version.
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Offline Jesse412

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17488 on: October 01, 2017, 10:35:30 AM »
The Purge: Election Year (2016)



I think the social commentary on classism and population control is probably more interesting than the over-the-top violence in this film series but for anyone who enjoyed the last sequel this is more of the same gory exploitive grindhouse action and suspense.  Frank Grillo's performance in this as well as the last movie made me think he might be decent in the role of the Punisher.
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Offline Jesse412

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17489 on: October 01, 2017, 10:48:09 AM »
The Grandmother (1970)

Trippy surreal, abstract and bizarre it combines animated sequences with live actors and uses virtually no dialogue.  Left me wondering what the hell I just watched but an interesting visual experiment and I think a must see for David Lynch fans.

The Amputee (1974)

Another David Lynch short film where a woman with both her legs amputated writes a letter narrated by her inner monologue while having her bandages changed by a nurse.  Lynch who plays the nurse begins cleaning her leg stumps which begin to puss and bleed until he seems overwhelmed and leaves frame.  It replays an almost identical version of itself shot on different black and white film stock.
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison