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Author Topic: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97  (Read 20221 times)

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Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97
« Reply #60 on: October 25, 2016, 10:16:22 PM »
#26
Lily Munster

49 Points, 4 Lists, #5 Stethacantus

Unbiography
Lily Munster, Countess of Shroudshire (née Dracula), is a fictional character in the CBS sitcom, The Munsters, originally played by Yvonne De Carlo. The matriarch of the Munster household, Lily is a vampire. The role was later played by Lee Meriwether in The Munsters Today and by Portia de Rossi in Mockingbird Lane.

Lily is the matriarch of the Munster family. She is very close with her niece, Marilyn. She has a werewolf for a brother, who appears in one episode, and a sister who is mentioned a few times who is Marilyn's mother. Lily is the voice of reason in the Munster household, often relied upon to set problems right, and typically mediates when Herman and Grandpa squabble.

Lily also has a fiery temper. While she is deeply in love with Herman ("Pussycat," as she calls him), she also frequently gets very angry at him (due to his frequent stupidity and occasional selfishness), and Herman often meekly discloses his fear (to others) of being on the receiving end of her wrath. She also has reprimanded her own father (Grandpa) on several occasions for his own foolish actions and stubborn self-righteousness.

During the course of the series, Lily works as a welder in a shipyard, a fashion model, and a palm reader in a tea room. In one episode she forces Herman to give her money so that she and Marilyn can open a beauty parlor, but this soon goes out of business, as Lily assumes her clientele wants to look more like her. These part-time jobs never seem to stick, and Lily would be back to being a homemaker by the next episode.


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Offline PsychoGoatee

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Re: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97
« Reply #61 on: October 25, 2016, 10:21:41 PM »
Vampire-tacular!

Another fan of Alucard and Harmony over here, lotta fun vampires around.  (Alucard is very serious, but that's also fun)


Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97
« Reply #62 on: October 25, 2016, 10:53:40 PM »
That's it for tonight!  Next time, 3 letter Ds, a C and a B.  And no, I'm not talking about cup sizes, pervo!

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Offline Tripe

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Re: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97
« Reply #63 on: October 26, 2016, 06:00:14 AM »
#28
Harmony Kendall

48 Points, 3 Lists, #5 Tripe
Yesssss

My, probably not alone in this by a wide margin, favourite moment about Harmony:

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« Last Edit: October 26, 2016, 06:03:27 AM by Tripe »


Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97
« Reply #64 on: October 26, 2016, 06:55:47 AM »
#25
Dracula (Bela Lugosi)

50 Points, 2 Lists, #1 Kete & Linszoid

Unbiography
Béla Ferenc Dezső Blaskó 20 October 1882 – 16 August 1956, better known as Bela Lugosi, was a Hungarian-American actor, famous for portraying Count Dracula in the 1931 film and for his roles in various other horror films.

Lugosi was approached in the summer of 1927 to star in a Broadway production of Dracula adapted by Hamilton Deane and John L. Balderston from Bram Stoker's novel. The Horace Liveright production was successful, running 261 performances before touring. In 1928, Lugosi decided to stay in California when the play ended its West Coast run. His performance piqued the interest of Fox Studios; In 1929, he appeared in the studio's silent film, The Veiled Woman. He also appeared in the (now, supposedly lost) film, Prisoners which was released in both a silent and sound versions. In 1929, with no other film roles in sight, he returned to the stage as Dracula for a short West Coast tour of the play. Lugosi remained in California where he resumed (under contract with Fox) his film work, appearing in early talkies often as a heavy or "exotic sheiks;" He also continued to lobby for his prized role in the film version of Dracula.

Despite his critically acclaimed performance on stage, Lugosi was not Universal Pictures’ first choice for the role of Dracula when the company optioned the rights to the Deane play and began production in 1930. A persistent rumor asserts that director Tod Browning's long-time collaborator, Lon Chaney, was Universal's first choice for the role, and that Lugosi was chosen only due to Chaney's death shortly before production. This is questionable, because Chaney had been under long-term contract to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer since 1925, and had negotiated a lucrative new contract just before his death.

Chaney and Browning had worked together on several projects (including four of Chaney's final five releases), but Browning was only a last-minute choice to direct the movie version of Dracula after the death of director Paul Leni, who was originally slated to direct. In 1927, Lugosi accepted the eponymous role in the American theatrical run of Dracula, a play based on Bram Stoker's gothic novel of the same name. After a half-year run on Broadway, Dracula toured the United States to much fanfare and critical acclaim throughout 1928-29. His portrayal of Dracula was so successful that Universal decided to make a movie of Dracula starring Lugosi. The film, Dracula, was a hit.

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Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97
« Reply #65 on: October 26, 2016, 08:43:03 AM »
#24
D

51 Points, 3 Lists, #1 Psycho Goatee

Unbiography
D is the half-vampire protagonist of the long-running book series Vampire Hunter D and its anime adaptations.  D wanders through a far-future post-nuclear Earth that combines elements of pulp genres: western, science fiction, horror, high fantasy, H. P. Lovecraftian mythos, folklore and occult science. The planet, once terrified by the elegant but cruel Nobles (vampires), ancient demons, mutants and their technological creations, is now slowly returning to a semblance of order and human control — thanks in part to the decadence that brought about the downfall of the vampire race, to the continued stubbornness of frontier dwellers and, to the rise of a caste of independent hunters-for-hire who eliminate supernatural threats.

D is a dhampir, the half-breed child of a vampire father and human mother, the ideal vampire hunter. He is renowned for his consummate skill and unearthly grace, but feared and despised for his mixed lineage: born of both races but belonging to neither. Often underestimated by his opponents, D possesses surprising power and resourcefulness, having most of the strengths of the Nobility and only mild levels of their common weaknesses. It has been seen in both movies that his power is not only physical, but extends into the magical realm as well. His supernatural powers make him one of the strongest beings in the world, if not the second strongest second only to his father. However, D prefers his physical abilities, only using his magic in times of great need. Unlike most dhampirs, D is able to live as a "normal" human; however, he is marked by his unearthly beauty and exceptionally powerful aura, and thus rarely accepted by human settlements.

D is the host for a sentient symbiote, Left Hand, a wise-cracking human face residing in his left palm, who can suck in massive amounts of matter through a wind void or vacuum tunnel. Left Hand enjoys needling the poker-faced D, but only appears as needed, rarely witnessed or heard by anyone other than D, yet aware of many of D's thoughts and actions. At all other times, D's left hand appears normal. Besides providing a contrast to D's reserved demeanor, Left Hand is incredibly useful, possessing many mysterious powers such as psychometry, inducing sleep, determining the medical condition of a victim, and the ability to size up the supernatural powers or prowess of an enemy, even beyond D's keen senses.

Status
Vampire hunter

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Offline Darth Geek

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Re: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97
« Reply #66 on: October 26, 2016, 09:20:16 AM »
Interesting. I expected Bela Legosi to be higher up on this list.



Offline Kete

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Re: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97
« Reply #67 on: October 26, 2016, 09:30:08 AM »
Interesting. I expected Bela Legosi to be higher up on this list.

Only on two lists?  That's bizarre.


Offline George-2.0

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Re: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97
« Reply #68 on: October 26, 2016, 09:40:26 AM »
I just lumped all my Count Dracula's as one entity. I didn't distinguish between actors or books etc. I don't know how that vote was counted.


Offline PsychoGoatee

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Re: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97
« Reply #69 on: October 26, 2016, 03:30:19 PM »
Bela is awesome, and we probably wouldn't have a lot of fun stuff like say The Count without his portrayal of Dracula. And that's key stuff in our pop culture right there.

D is one of my favs, that anime movie adaptation Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust in particular is my favorite vampire flick. It's like a Hammer movie with crazy fast pace and action thrown in (with respect to Captain Kronos this is a bit more action packed), and classy as hell. 





Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97
« Reply #70 on: October 26, 2016, 05:01:01 PM »
#23
Drusilla

53 Points, 3 Lists, #2 Tripe

Unbiography
Drusilla is a vampire who appears in Buffy the Vampire Slayer.  Once an innocent young girl in the 1860s with psychic powers, Drusilla was a devout Catholic pure in spirit.  When the evil vampire Angelus discovered her, he decided to torment her and drive her mad by murdering her entire family and chasing her where ever she fled, ruining her life.  And when she wished to be dead, Angelus turned her into a vampire so her pain could last forever.

Now a mad vampire, Drusilla traveled with Angelus and his mate Darla as they traveled the Earth causing havoc.  Angelus also would use Drusilla's ability to predict the future for their own advantage.  Later she met the poet foppish poet William and turned him into a vampire.  The two started a relationship but also continued a pretty open relationship with Angelus, causing a lot of tension between the two.

Eventually, Angelus gets cursed by having his soul returned to him, including all of the guilt and morality that comes with it.  This causes a rift between the group and Drusilla leaves with Spike to make more trouble.  Many years later, Drusilla is attacked by a mob in prague, leaving her weakened and dependant on Spike.  They end up travelling to Sunnydale and plan to use Angelus' (now Angel) blood to return her to normal.  Eventually, they succeed (mostly) and are later joined by Angelus after his curse is removed.  Drusilla is drawn to Angel once more, creating a tension once more between Spike and Angelus.  Eventually, Angelus is defeated and Spike kidnaps Dru and hits the road.  But afterward, the relationship is beyond repair and Drusilla goes off on her own.

Drusilla is very childish and though is often seen being dependent on or clinging close to others, is quite formidable on her own.  Her madness leads her to often childish behaviour and murder, inflicting torture and bloody chaos make her gleeful.  She also seems to be attracted to things that are beautiful and sweet but those things usually get destroyed, whether because she wants to see it happen and/or because she is far too mad to take proper care of such things.  She often also speaks in poetic but pretty darn crazy sentences.

Status
Soup sandwich

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Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97
« Reply #71 on: October 26, 2016, 08:15:09 PM »
#22
Carmilla

53 Points, 3 Lists, #1 Tripe

Unbiography
Carmilla is a Gothic novella by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu and one of the early works of vampire fiction, predating Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897) by 26 years. First published as a serial in The Dark Blue (1871–72), the story is narrated by a young woman preyed upon by a female vampire named Carmilla, later revealed to be Mircalla, Countess Karnstein (Carmilla is an anagram of Mircalla). The story is often anthologized and has been adapted many times in film and other media.


Laura, the protagonist, narrates, beginning with her childhood in a "picturesque and solitary" castle amid an extensive forest in Styria, where she lives with her father, a wealthy English widower retired from service to the Austrian Empire. When she was six, Laura had a vision of a beautiful visitor in her bedchamber. She later claims to have been punctured in her breast, although no wound was found.

Twelve years later, Laura and her father are admiring the sunset in front of the castle when her father tells her of a letter from his friend, General Spielsdorf. The General was supposed to bring his niece, Bertha Rheinfeldt, to visit the two, but the niece suddenly died under mysterious circumstances. The General ambiguously concludes that he will discuss the circumstances in detail when they meet later.

Laura, saddened by the loss of a potential friend, longs for a companion. A carriage accident outside Laura's home unexpectedly brings a girl of Laura's age into the family's care. Her name is Carmilla. Both girls instantly recognize the other from the "dream" they both had when they were young.

Carmilla appears injured after her carriage accident, but her mysterious mother informs Laura's father that her journey is urgent and cannot be delayed. She arranges to leave her daughter with Laura and her father until she can return in three months. Before she leaves, she sternly notes that her daughter will not disclose any information whatsoever about her family, past, or herself, and that Carmilla is of sound mind. Laura comments that this information seems needless to say, and her father laughs it off.

Carmilla and Laura grow to be very close friends, but occasionally Carmilla's mood abruptly changes. She sometimes makes unsettling romantic advances towards Laura. Carmilla refuses to tell anything about herself, despite questioning by Laura. Her secrecy is not the only mysterious thing about Carmilla; she never joins the household in its prayers, she sleeps much of the day, and she seems to sleepwalk outside at night.

Meanwhile, young women and girls in the nearby towns have begun dying from an unknown malady. When the funeral procession of one such victim passes by the two girls, Laura joins in the funeral hymn. Carmilla bursts out in rage and scolds Laura, complaining that the hymn hurts her ears.

When a shipment of restored heirloom paintings arrives, Laura finds a portrait of her ancestor, Mircalla, Countess Karnstein, dated 1698. The portrait resembles Carmilla exactly, down to the mole on her neck. Carmilla says she might be descended from the Karnsteins even though the family died out centuries before.

Status
Countess

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Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97
« Reply #72 on: October 26, 2016, 10:01:19 PM »
#21
Bunnicula

58 Points, 4 Lists, #1 Cole Stratton

Unbiography
Bunnicula is the title character of the children's book series of the same name.  It is a rabbit with strange and unusual eating habits and vampire-like qualities, but otherwise harmless.  Bunnicula came to the Monroe household on a dark, stormy night. Toby found him in the theater, which was at the time showing Dracula, and brought him home, where Mrs. Monroe brought up the clever name Bunnicula. A note was placed with Bunnicula when he was found, written in Russian, reading "Please take care of my baby." It is unknown who left Bunnicula in the theater or wrote the note, but the letter was written in a dialect that nobody except Harold could read. He is subjected to many murder attempts by Chester, who thinks that the rabbit would eventually become carnivorous. However, his "indestructible" stature proves to Chester that he cannot be killed.

Due to his young age, Bunnicula cannot talk but he shows emotions all the same, such as winking happily at Harold or crying. He does exhibit the unusual ability to get in and out of his cage without using the door, and initially opens the refrigerator by himself. Instead of a rabbit's buck teeth, Bunnicula inexplicably has fangs, which enables him to bite vegetables and suck the juice out of them, similar to the method by which Dracula dines, leaving them ghostly white.

Status
Pet

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Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97
« Reply #73 on: October 26, 2016, 11:21:58 PM »
OK, that's it for now!  More soon!

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Johnny Unusual

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Re: The Top 50 Vampires Countdown! List of Crap #97
« Reply #74 on: October 27, 2016, 07:36:01 AM »
#20
Dracula  (Christopher Lee)

59 Points, 3 Lists, #3 Linszoid

Unbiography
Sir Christopher Frank Carandini Lee CBE (27 May 1922 – 7 June 2015) was an English actor, singer, and author. With a career spanning nearly 70 years, Lee initially portrayed villains and became best known for his role as Count Dracula in a sequence of Hammer Horror films.

Lee's first film for Hammer was The Curse of Frankenstein (1957), in which he played Frankenstein's monster, with Peter Cushing as Baron Victor Frankenstein. It was the first film to co-star Lee and Cushing, who ultimately appeared together in over twenty films and became close friends.  When he arrived at a casting session for the film, "they asked me if I wanted the part, I said yes and that was that".  A little later, Lee co-starred with Boris Karloff in the film Corridors of Blood (1958), but Lee's own appearance as Frankenstein's monster led to his first appearance as the Transylvanian vampire in the film Dracula (1958, known as Horror of Dracula in the United States). Lee accepted a similar role in an Italian-French horror picture called Uncle Was a Vampire (1959).

Lee returned to the role of Dracula in Hammer's Dracula: Prince of Darkness (1965). Lee's role has no lines, he merely hisses his way through the film. Stories vary as to the reason for this: Lee states he refused to speak the poor dialogue he was given, but screenwriter Jimmy Sangster claims that the script did not contain any lines for the character. This film set the standard for most of the Dracula sequels in the sense that half the film's running time was spent on telling the story of Dracula's resurrection and the character's appearances were brief. Lee went on record to state that he was virtually "blackmailed" by Hammer into starring in the subsequent films; unable or unwilling to pay him his going rate, they would resort to reminding him of how many people he would put out of work, if he did not take part.

The process went like this: The telephone would ring and my agent would say, "Jimmy Carreras [President of Hammer Films] has been on the phone, they've got another Dracula for you." And I would say, "Forget it! I don't want to do another one." I'd get a call from Jimmy Carreras, in a state of hysteria. "What's all this about?!" "Jim, I don't want to do it, and I don't have to do it." "No, you have to do it!" And I said, "Why?" He replied, "Because I've already sold it to the American distributor with you playing the part. Think of all the people you know so well, that you will put out of work!" Emotional blackmail. That's the only reason I did them.

His roles in the films Dracula Has Risen from the Grave (1968), Taste the Blood of Dracula (1969), and Scars of Dracula (1970) all gave the Count very little to do. Lee said in an interview in 2005, "all they do is write a story and try and fit the character in somewhere, which is very clear when you see the films. They gave me nothing to do! I pleaded with Hammer to let me use some of the lines that Bram Stoker had written. Occasionally, I sneaked one in." Although Lee may not have liked what Hammer was doing with the character, worldwide audiences embraced the films, which were all commercially successful.

Lee starred in two further Dracula films for Hammer in the early 1970s, both of which attempted to bring the character into the modern-day era. These were not commercially successful: Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972) and The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973). The film was tentatively titled Dracula Is Dead... and Well and Living in London, a parody of the stage and film musical revue Jacques Brel Is Alive and Well and Living in Paris, but Lee was not amused. Speaking at a press conference in 1973 to announce the film, Lee said, "I'm doing it under protest... I think it is fatuous. I can think of twenty adjectives – fatuous, pointless, absurd. It's not a comedy, but it's got a comic title. I don't see the point." The Satanic Rites Of Dracula was the last Dracula film that Christopher Lee played the Dracula role in, as he felt he had played the part too many times and that the Dracula films had deteriorated in quality.

In all, Lee played Dracula ten times: seven films for Hammer Productions, once for Jesse Franco's Count Dracula (1970), uncredited in Jerry Lewis's One More Time (1970) and Édouard Molinaro's Dracula and Son (1976).

Status
Count, Knight

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