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Author Topic: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!  (Read 17358 times)

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Offline PsychoGoatee

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #15 on: June 29, 2016, 11:19:36 PM »
Part 2 is infamously pretty bad, garnering a 0% on Rotten Tomatoes.

That movie is awesome, very funny. I'd rank it above part 3 myself, fun that they went to Japan for it. But tis all personal taste. It has a higher IMDb score than say Police Academy 4 for example. (I do dig Police Academy 4, naturally.) Lloyd is planning on making Toxic Avenger 5 after getting Return to Nuke 'em High part 2 into theaters.

On Ernest, my fav by far is Ernest Goes to Jail. Great crazy comedy, holds up.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2016, 11:26:06 PM by PsychoGoatee »


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #16 on: June 29, 2016, 11:30:12 PM »
And if you listen to How Did This Get Made?, you know Evil Ernest oozes raw, irresistible sexuality.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #17 on: June 30, 2016, 08:25:58 AM »
#45
Jack Ryan

First Film – The Hunt for Red October - 1989
Most Recent –  Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit  - 2014

20 Points, 2 Lists, #15 Linszoid

What Is It?
2ndLt Dr. Sir John Patrick "Jack" Ryan, Sr., USMC (ret.), KCVO (Hon.), Ph.D. is a fictional character created by Tom Clancy who appears in many of his novels and their respective film adaptations.
The Jack Ryan film series is an American series of thriller films, based on the fictional character of Jack Ryan, who originally appeared in a series of books by Tom Clancy. In the series of five films, four actors have portrayed Ryan.
Despite inconsistency with its lead actors and crew members, the series has been distributed solely by Paramount Pictures since its inception. Mace Neufeld has produced every film in the series, with producing partner Robert Rehme co-producing Patriot Games and Clear and Present Danger and Lorenzo di Bonaventura co-producing Shadow Recruit. With a combined unadjusted worldwide gross of $788.4 million to date, the films constitute the 57th highest-grossing film series. The films have been nominated for four Academy Awards, winning one for Sound Effects (now Sound Editing) in The Hunt for Red October (at the 63rd Awards).
The continuity of the films differ from the novels. In the novels, Patriot Games occurs before The Hunt for Red October, though the order was reversed in the film versions. Additionally, The Sum of All Fears is not part of the Baldwin/Ford series, but rather an intended reboot of the franchise, and therefore departs significantly from the chronology of the novels. It takes place in 2002, whereas the novel takes place in 1991/1992. Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit is a second reboot of the franchise that departs from all previous films.

High Point
I personally like the Hunt for Red October the most, thanks largely to a great cast.

Low Point
Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit and The Sum of All Fears, both attempts to reboot the franchise, kind of fizzled.

Where could we go next? – I didn’t see Shadow Recruit, but the marketing made it look like a slick action flick, which seems like the wrong approach to me.  While there’s always room for more spy stuff, I guess, it did look like a watered down version of what was popular.  It seems like it should feel a bit more like  John le Carré novel but easier to follow, a little less cynical and with more action. We could have Josh Brolin in the lead (or if you want young Jack Ryan adventures, then perhaps Alden Ehrenreich, who played the singing cowboy in Hail, Caesar). And I guess Ron Howard can direct.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2016, 04:51:03 PM by Johnny Unusual »


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #18 on: June 30, 2016, 08:47:58 AM »
#44
Laurel & Hardy

First Film – The Lucky Dog- 1921
Most Recent –  Atoll K-  1951

Note: Stethacantus stated this: Just the series made at Hal Roach Studios  beginning with the short The Second Hundred Years ( 1927 ) and ending with Saps at Sea (1940)
21 Points, 1 List, #5 Stethacantus

What Is It?
Laurel and Hardy were a motion picture comedy team whose official filmography consists of 106 films released between 1921 and 1951. Together they appeared in 34 silent shorts, 45 sound shorts, and 27 full-length sound feature films. In addition to these, Laurel and Hardy appeared in at least 20 foreign-language versions of their films and a promotional film, Galaxy of Stars (1936), made for European film distributors.
Stan Laurel (1890–1965) and Oliver Hardy (1892–1957) were established as film comedians prior to their teaming, with Laurel appearing in over 50 silent films and Hardy in over 250. (Hardy also appeared in three sound features without Laurel.)  Although they first worked together in the film The Lucky Dog (1921), this was a chance pairing and it was not until 1926 when both separately signed contracts with the Hal Roach film studio that they appeared in movie shorts together.  Laurel and Hardy officially became a team the following year, in their eleventh silent short film The Second Hundred Years (1927).  The pair remained with the Roach studio until 1940. Between 1941 and 1945 they appeared in eight features and one short for 20th Century Fox and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.  After finishing their movie commitments Laurel and Hardy concentrated on stage shows, embarking on a music hall tour of Great Britain. In 1950, they made their last film Atoll K, a French/Italian co-production.
In 1932 Laurel and Hardy's short The Music Box won the Academy Award for Live Action Short Film (Comedy). In 1960, Laurel was presented with an Honorary Academy Award "for his creative pioneering in the field of cinema comedy.” In 1992, 1997 and 2012, respectively, Big Business, The Music Box and Sons of the Desert were added to the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.  For their contributions to cinema Laurel and Hardy have been awarded separate stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

High Point
Well, Stethacantus voted for it and he specifically wanted to draw attention to the Hal Roach years of the studio.
Low Point
After the Hal Roach years, I guess?

Where could we go next? – Again, you really can’t make Laurel and Hardy without them.  Though they tried…

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/_iPw5yf78Uc" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/_iPw5yf78Uc</a>


Offline Darth Geek

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #19 on: June 30, 2016, 10:56:19 AM »

Where could we go next? – Again, you really can’t make Laurel and Hardy without them.  Though they tried…

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/_iPw5yf78Uc" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/_iPw5yf78Uc</a>

There was also a 1999 movie with different actors that I have heard is awful. As if it could be anything but without the original two.



Offline PsychoGoatee

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #20 on: June 30, 2016, 12:00:34 PM »
And if you listen to How Did This Get Made?, you know Evil Ernest oozes raw, irresistible sexuality.

Hell yeah, one of my fav podcasts.


#45
Jack Ryan

First Film – The Hunt for Red October - 1989
Most Recent –  Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit  - 2014

20 Points, 1 List, #6 Psycho Goatee

Jack Ryan wasn't on my list, must be a name mix-up. #6 on my list is Toxic Avenger.


Offline linszoid

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #21 on: June 30, 2016, 03:48:35 PM »
And if you listen to How Did This Get Made?, you know Evil Ernest oozes raw, irresistible sexuality.

Hell yeah, one of my fav podcasts.


#45
Jack Ryan

First Film – The Hunt for Red October - 1989
Most Recent –  Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit  - 2014

20 Points, 1 List, #6 Psycho Goatee

Jack Ryan wasn't on my list, must be a name mix-up. #6 on my list is Toxic Avenger.

I think I had him on my list but it wasn't near #6


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #22 on: June 30, 2016, 04:51:36 PM »
Fixed.  Sorry for the mix up.


Offline stethacantus

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #23 on: June 30, 2016, 06:09:33 PM »
Note: Stethacantus stated this: Just the series made at Hal Roach Studios  beginning with the short The Second Hundred Years ( 1927 ) and ending with Saps at Sea (1940)

I only stated that because the Laurel & Hardy films released by Hal Roach Studios had official run numbers, and was legitimately released as a film series rather than as individual films released by the same actors. Also, because only the films made at Roach studios gave L&H full creative freedom, while the  studios they later worked at forced them to use scripts they did not write. And legally, Hal Roach owned the name Laurel & Hardy, which is why their later films were officially Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. The Laurel & Hardy series at Hal Roach ran for 74 films, the later 13 which were features. The other 61 were shorts, 21 which were silent. They were distributed by MGM, with exception to the final two feature films which were released through United Artists. Pathe America was the previous distributor for Hal Roach studios, and had held back a number of Roach's shorts when his studio signed with MGM. Three of these movies were erroneously released as Laurel & Hardy shorts, including Flying Elephants where Laurel & Hardy were not even a team.

The current 106 films canonized as the Laurel & Hardy filmography includes a lot of films that past film historians refused to include in their L&H filmographies. For example A Tree in a Test Tube ( 1943 ) was an industrial film and not meant to be screened publicly. For some reason the recently discovered Galaxy of Stars ( 1936 ) has not been accepted as part of the cannon. A lot of the early films in the 106 have both Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy in the cast, but not acting as a team. For example, The Lucky Dog ( 1921 ) was an early Stan Laurel solo short with Oliver Hardy cast as a heavy. 45 Minutes From Hollywood ( 1926 ) has both Laurel and Hardy, but they are never on screen at the same time. The same can be said for the recently discovered Charlie Chase short Now I'll Tell One ( 1927 ) which has Laurel as Chase's divorce lawyer and features Hardy in a flashback. Only two of these early films feature Laurel and hardy as a team, Duck Soup ( 1927 ) and Do Detectives Think ( 1927 ). They do not include movies where Laurel directed and Hardy acted, including Madame Mystery ( 1926 ) which was early screen queen Theda Bara's final movie. Some argue that the 18 foreign language films should be counted as separate features. Many of them have gags and entire scenes that are not on the official American releases. Pardon Us ( 1931 ), for example, has an alternate ending in the Spanish version.

For the high point. Too many to mention. They were that damn good. Both Big Business and Double Whoopee are usually cited by fans as their best silent films. Busy Bodies and The Music Box as their best sound shorts. But their feature film Sons of the Desert is usually cited by fans as their best feature movie.

For the low point, Saps at Sea was the slowest of the Roach productions. But L&H fans usually cite their later films as the worst, especially those made for 20th Century Fox. For the longest time The Big Noise ( 1944 ) was called their worst film, and one of the worst movies ever made, period. But that opinion changed when for the first time in decades the film was re-released on home video. Other L&H fans hate Atoll K ( 1951 ) because of how sickly Stan Laurel looks in it. My personal opinion is that the worst Laurel and Hardy film ever made is Nothing But Trouble ( 1944 ) for MGM studios. The sad thing is that this movie had very talented people behind the scenes. Must of the gags were written by Stan's good friend Buster Keaton. And it was directed by Sam Taylor who's filmography includes the classic Safety Last ( 1923 ). The problem was that the movie was written to be a thrill comedy. But MGM insisted on all the scenes being shot with back projection. So when Laurel & Hardy are hanging on a ledge, it looks fake. And when they are trying to steal a steak from a lion, you could tell neither were in the same cage. MGM pretty much sabotaged all of Buster Keaton's gags. The end result is the only Laurel and Hardy movie where I did not find anything to laugh at.

There was also a 1999 movie with different actors that I have heard is awful. As if it could be anything but without the original two.

That movie was The All New Adventures of Laurel & Hardy in: For Love And Mummy which starred Bronson Pinchot as Laurel and Gailard Sartain as Hardy. It also had Academy Award winner F Murray Abraham in the cast. It was a South African production directed by Larry Harmon a.k.a. the original Bozo the Clown. Harmon was smart enough to buy up the rights to the names and likenesses of various screen comedians in the 60s, mostly from their families after they died. He had the rights to L&H for decades, and all that time kept attempting to make L&H movies. Other than that, he produced the L&H cartoon series, and got screen credit for lending out L&H to Scoobie Doo for an episode. He also put L&H in a lot of commercials.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #24 on: June 30, 2016, 11:04:24 PM »
#43A
Three Flavours Cornetto (AKA Blood and Ice Cream)

First Film – Shaun of the Dead - 2004
Most Recent –  The World’s End-  2013

22 Points, 1 List, #4 Johnny Unusual

What Is It?
The Three Flavours Cornetto trilogy (also known as the Cornetto trilogy or the Blood and Ice Cream trilogy) is a series of British comedic genre films directed by Edgar Wright, written by Wright and Simon Pegg, produced by Nira Park, and starring Pegg and Nick Frost. The trilogy consists of Shaun of the Dead (2004), Hot Fuzz (2007), and The World's End (2013).
The name originates from a "silly joke" during the promotion of Hot Fuzz. Wright had written in Cornetto ice cream as a hangover cure for Frost's character in Shaun of the Dead, based on his own experiences. In Hot Fuzz, Wright included a couple of brief throwaway scenes that referred to the Cornetto joke in Shaun. On the promotional tour of Hot Fuzz during production of The World's End, one interviewer pointed out the use of Cornetto in the first two films, and Wright jokingly said that they represent a trilogy comparable to Krzysztof Kieślowski's Three Colours film trilogy.

Wright seriously considered the three movies as a trilogy, and wrote The World's End to complete themes set out in the earlier films, adding a Cornetto reference to the film. Each film in the trilogy is connected to a specific Cornetto flavour appearing in each film. Shaun of the Dead features a strawberry-flavoured Cornetto, which signifies the film's bloody and gory elements,  Hot Fuzz includes the blue original Cornetto, to signify the police element to the film, and The World's End features the green mint chocolate chip flavour (though only shown by a wrapper caught in the wind) representing "little green men" and science fiction.  According to Wright, Wall's, manufacturer of the Cornetto, were "very pleased with the namecheck".

Wright considered each of the films a "Trojan horse", "genre films that have a relationship comedy smuggled inside a zombie movie, a cop movie and a sci-fi movie".  Thematically, Wright saw each of the films containing common themes of "the individuals in a collective [...] about growing up and [...] about the dangers of perpetual adolescence”. Wright reworked the script of The World's End to conclude on these themes. The films are further linked by a common set of actors. Wright, Park, Pegg, and Frost collaborated previously in the TV series Spaced from 1999 to 2001. Martin Freeman, Bill Nighy, Rafe Spall, Julia Deakin, Patricia Franklin, and Garth Jennings appear in each of the films as well as other projects by Wright and Pegg. Clark Collis observes in Entertainment Weekly that the films also feature "a running gag involving garden fences"

High Point
I always found Hot Fuzz to be the strongest of the three films with both the best gags, some fantastic action and, as always, top notch editing for maximum comedic effect.

Low Point
The World’s End is probably the weakest despite having the most promising start and being the most incisive about its characters.  It feels the most mature, but I feel it’s weakness is the big threat, which feels surprisingly unthreatening despite the scale of it.  Still a great movie.

Where could we go next? –Well, I think the Cornetto trilogy is done, but I certainly would like to see Pegg, Frost and Wright get back together some day.  In the meantime, I look forward to Wright’s other films


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #25 on: June 30, 2016, 11:23:44 PM »
#43B
Tremors

First Film – Tremors - 1990
Most Recent –  Tremors 5: Bloodlines -  2015

22 Points, 1 List, #4 Relaxing Dragon

What Is It?
The Tremors franchise is a monster movie series centering on the vicious attacks of subterranean worm-like creatures known as graboids. It began in 1990 with the successful release of Tremors, which spawned four direct-to-video films; three sequels, Tremors 2: Aftershocks, Tremors 3: Back to Perfection, Tremors 5: Bloodlines and a prequel, Tremors 4: The Legend Begins.


High Point
Definitely Tremors.  Funny, with some truly original movie monsters.

Low Point
I haven’t seen any others but Jamie Kennedy is in the most recent, which is a pretty big warning sign.

Where could we go next? – I don’t want a reboot (Michael Gross needs work) but a clean slate approach to all of the mythology of the previous installments (save in subtle ways) and go back to basics.  Michael Dougherty of Krampus and Trick ‘r Treat might make for a good director.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #26 on: July 01, 2016, 12:19:26 AM »
#43C
Lupin the 3rd

First Film – Lupin III (AKA Lupin Vs. The Clone AKA The Secret of Mamo AKA the Mystery of Mamo) - 1978
Most Recent –  Lupin the III: Daisuke Jigen's Gravestone-  2014

22 Points, 1 List, #4 Psycho Goatee

What Is It?
Lupin III also written as Lupin the Third or Lupin the 3rd, is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Monkey Punch. It follows the escapades of master thief Arsène Lupin III, the grandson of Arsène Lupin, the gentleman thief of Maurice Leblanc's series of novels.

Arsène Lupin III, the grandson of the fictional gentleman thief, Arsène Lupin, is considered the world's greatest thief, known for announcing his intentions to steal valuable objects by sending a calling card to the owners of his desired items. His right-hand man and closest ally is Daisuke Jigen, an expert marksman who can accurately shoot a target in 0.3 seconds. Although Lupin and Jigen frequently work as a two-man team, they are often joined by Goemon Ishikawa XIII, a master swordsman whose sword can cut anything, or Fujiko Mine, a femme fatale and Lupin's love interest. Although Fujiko usually works together with the others, she occasionally exploits Lupin's interest in her to steal the treasure for herself. Lupin and his gang are constantly chased by Inspector Koichi Zenigata of the ICPO, who has made it his life's work to arrest them, pursuing Lupin across the globe.

During the broadcast run of the second television series, an animated feature film was also produced titled simply Lupin III (later known as Lupin III: Lupin vs. the Clone), which was released in Japanese theaters on December 16, 1978.  The movie received four different English language dubs. The first dub, created in 1978, received experimental screenings in the United States by Toho.  The next two dubs were created for home releases and were retitled The Mystery of Mamo and Secret of Mamo.  The fourth was released on DVD by Geneon in North America on July 29, 2003, under the title The Secret of Mamo. Manga Entertainment released the movie in the United Kingdom on August 4, 2008. Discotek Media released the film on DVD on February 26, 2013 and includes all four English dubs.

Hayao Miyazaki directed the next feature film, The Castle of Cagliostro, which was released in Japanese theaters on December 15, 1979. This movie was loosely based on Maurice Leblanc's Arsène Lupin novel La Comtesse de Cagliostro ("The Countess of Cagliostro”) .The third film, Legend of the Gold of Babylon, was released in Japanese theaters on July 13, 1985. AnimEigo released the film in North America in 1994 under the "Rupan III" name.  In 2005, Discotek Media acquired it for a DVD release, however, it was later cancelled due to NA's declining anime industry.  Ten years after Babylon was released, Die! Nostradamus entered Japanese theaters on April 22, 1995. The fifth anime feature film, Dead or Alive, was directed by the creator of the series, Monkey Punch, and released in Japanese theaters on April 20, 1996.  Although he was credited as chief director for the production, Monkey Punch said that he left most of the work to his assistant directors and only directed the opening and ending sequences while acting as consultant for everything else.  Following the production of the movie, he stated that the process was so exhausting he would not like to direct another anime again.

In April 2013, an announcement in Weekly Shōnen Sunday magazine revealed that a Lupin the 3rd vs. Detective Conan: The Movie was in production, four years after the two series had a crossover TV special together.  It was released on December 7, 2013, making it the first Lupin III theatrical feature in 17 years. Takeshi Koike directed a continuation film to the Woman Called Fujiko Mine TV series. Entitled Daisuke Jigen's Gravestone, it depicts how Lupin and Jigen became partners and was released theatrically on June 21, 2014.

High Point
Hayao Miyazaki’s The Castle of Cagliostro.  Though it certainly is one of Hayao’s less ambitious and personal works, he still did a stellar job on this great romp that fires on all cylinders and allows the entire cast to have their moments.

Low Point
I admit I don’t know, though the TV movies are more likely to be the weaker ones.

Where could we go next? – Shinichirō Watanabe of Cowboy Bebop has never directed one of these.  This is a gross oversight.



Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #27 on: July 01, 2016, 12:56:18 AM »
#42
Before

First Film – Before Sunrise - 1995
Most Recent –  Before Midnight -  2013

23 Points, 1 List, #3 Fred Garvin

What Is It?
The Before Trilogy is a series of romantic films centering on the characters of Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Céline (Julie Delphy) and are directed and written by Richard Linklater (as well as Kim Krizan for the first film and Hawke and Delphy in the second and third).  In the first film, Jesse and Céline encounter each other in a chance meeting in Vienna and spend the evening together discussing their views on life and romance, in the second, they reconnect 9 years later in Paris and in the third film we find that Céline and Jesse are now married with children and discuss their fears about the present and future.

High Point
I think all are considered very strong pieces of film making.

Low Point
Sounds like there are no low points, as the series is pretty universally beloved.

Where could we go next?
Though Midnight is probably a logical end point, it might not be the worst idea to revisit the characters next decade.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #28 on: July 01, 2016, 02:45:18 AM »
#41
Sherlock Holmes (Basil Rathbone/Nigel Bruce era)

First Film – The Hound of the Baskervilles - 1939
Most Recent –  Dressed to Kill -  1946

23 Points, 2 Lists, #5 Fred Garvin

What Is It?
A series of fourteen films based on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories were released between 1939 and 1946; the British actors Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce played Holmes and Dr. John Watson, respectively. The first two films in the series were produced by 20th Century Fox and released in 1939. The studio stopped making the films after these, but Universal Studios acquired the rights from the Doyle estate and produced a further twelve films.

Although the films from 20th Century Fox had large budgets, high production values and were set in the Victorian era, Universal Studios updated the films to have Holmes investigating the Nazis, and produced them as B pictures with lower budgets. Both Rathbone and Bruce continued their roles when the series changed studios, as did Mary Gordon, who played the recurring character Mrs. Hudson.

In the 1970s four of the Universal-produced films fell into the public domain when their copyright was not renewed. These four films were restored and colorized. Some of the films in the series had become degraded over time, with some of the original negatives lost and others suffering from nitrate deterioration because of the unstable cellulose nitrate film. The UCLA Film and Television Archive restored the series, putting the films onto modern polyester film, in a process that was jointly paid for by UCLA, Warner Bros. and Hugh Hefner.

High Point
I’ve only seen the Hound of the Baskervilles, but I found it to be a real treat.

Low Point
I don’t know but Rathbone seemed increasingly frustrated that he felt each installment was a faded imitation of the one before.

Where could we go next?
 We are pretty full up to here with Sherlock Holmes right now.  I’m sure there are many great tales to tell, but I wouldn’t know what to add to the conversation at the moment.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #29 on: July 01, 2016, 03:17:11 AM »
I'll get more out "tomorrow" which will really be later today!  NO MORE TIES, by the way!