Author Topic: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's  (Read 28993 times)

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Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2013, 05:22:25 AM »
Dang.  My number 2 is probably not going to make it (though it's possible, though unlikely that QV voted for it)  It wouldn't bother me so much, but it was just by a hair.  But I really couldn't add any more to my list.  I barely like the stuff at the bottom.

The list started at 23 points. Everyone's #2 is going to make it.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2013, 05:27:36 AM »
Except I only had 23 entries...


Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2013, 06:50:27 AM »
La Blue Girl is far better than Legend of the Overfiend but I'm not looking it up to see if it's also from the '80s.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #18 on: September 11, 2013, 06:36:52 PM »
#46 –Galaxy Rangers
(25 Points) 1 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 – CJones
Not even ONE of them was named Mo-rice.
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Release Date:  1986

Just the plagarism
The Adventures of the Galaxy Rangers (broadcast between 1986 and 1989) is an American animated Space Western television series created by Robert Mandell and Gaylord Entertainment Company.

The series combines sci-fi stories with traditional wild west themes. It is one of the first anime-style shows produced mainly in the USA, although the actual animation was done by the Japanese animation studio Tokyo Movie Shinsha. At the time it aired, The Adventures of the Galaxy Rangers was considered a revolutionary children's show.

The show is set in the future, some time after the year 2086, when two aliens from the planets Andor and Kirwin travel to Earth to search for allies against the expansionist Crown Empire led by the Queen of the Crown. In return for the help, the two aliens gave mankind construction plans for a hyperdrive device. After this key event in human history, interstellar travel flourished and a huge number of colonies emerged in distant star-systems. Alongside the growth of human activities in space, criminal activities also grew, and the new colonies required defense against various threats, including the Crown Empire. A group known as "BETA" (Bureau for Extra-Terrestrial Affairs) was founded to cope with these tasks, with a "Ranger" division being a part of it.

Most of the colonies portrayed in the show specialized in either agriculture or mining "star stones". Many of the planets on the show have names that evoke ideas of a Western setting, Nebraska, Mesa, Ozark, and Prairie being a few.

BETA is shown to be the major military and exploratory arm of Earth. The organization's headquarters are on Earth. BETA sustains several bases on and around Earth, such as the Longshot Research Facility in the Grand Canyon and the BETA space station in Earth's orbit.
The Series-5 Brain Implant, or S5 is implied to be the closest mankind will ever get to merging with cybernetics. The S5 implant enables a dramatic boost of innate abilities due to its unique conversion of bio-electrical power generated by alpha radiation stored within the badges worn by the Galaxy Rangers.

The Crown Empire, also known as the "Crown," is ruled by the Queen of the Crown, whose intentions and motivations are described as being evil. She controls a large number of planets in a vast section of the galaxy, all of which she rules as a cruel tyrant. The Queen controls her empire using creatures called Slaver Lords with whom she has a psychic link. Slaver Lords derive their power from the psychic energy of other beings. After the Empire encountered humans, the Queen discovered that they were more suitable for energy extraction than any other previously encountered species.

Quantum Vagina’s take - There is absolutely nothing wrong with this concept. Cowboys are awesome. Space is awesome. I’m still annoyed at the lack of a Maurice, though.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #19 on: September 11, 2013, 06:46:42 PM »
#45 –Fist of the Northstar
(25 Points) 1 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 – McDonald’s
ATATATATATATATA
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Release Date:  1984

Just the plagarism
Fist of the North Star (北斗の拳 Hokuto no Ken?) is a Japanese manga series written by Buronson and drawn by Tetsuo Hara that was serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump from 1983 to 1988, spanning 245 chapters, which were initially collected in a 27-volume tankōbon edition by Shueisha. Set in a post-apocalyptic world that has been destroyed by a nuclear war, the story centers around a warrior named Kenshiro, the successor of a deadly martial art style known as Hokuto Shinken, which gives him the ability to kill most adversaries from within through the use of the human body's secret vital points, often resulting in an exceptionally violent and gory death. Kenshiro dedicates his life to fighting against the various ravagers who threaten the lives of the weak and innocent, as well as rival martial artists, including his own "brothers" from the same clan.

The manga was adapted into to anime TV series produced by Toei Animation which aired on Fuji TV affiliates from 1984 through 1988, comprising a combined total of 152 episodes. Several films, OVAs, and video games had been produced as well, including a series of spin-offs centering around other characters from the original story.

The original manga was republished in English by Viz Communications as a monthly comic book, and later by Gutsoon! Entertainment as a series of colorized graphic novels, although neither translations were completed. English adaptations of other Fist of the North Star media have also been licensed to other companies, including the TV series and the original 1986 film.

Hokuto no Ken was first adaptated into a weekly anime series by Toei Animation under the title Seikimatsu Kyūseishu Densetsu: Hokuto no Ken (世紀末救世主伝説 北斗の拳?, lit. Legend of the Century's End Messiah: Fist of the North Star). The series aired on Fuji Television from October 4, 1984 to March 5, 1987, lasting 109 episodes. It was immediately followed by a sequel series, titled Hokuto no Ken 2, which aired from March 13, 1987 to February 18, 1988, lasting for 43 additional episodes (a combined total of 152 episodes between both series). Reruns are aired in Japan on the satellite television network Animax.

The first 36 episodes of the first series were translated and dubbed by Manga Entertainment in 1999, although only the first 24 episodes were released on VHS. All 36 episodes of the dub version were aired on Showtime Beyond in the United States and on Sci-Fi Channel in the United Kingdom, and were later released on individual DVD volumes in 2003. In 2008, the US subsidiary of Toei Animation produced official subtitled-only translations of all 152 episodes, which were released on various paid download and video streaming websites available only for North American customers. Discotek Media announced on October 2, 2009 that they have licensed the entire Fist of the North Star TV series. They stated they would release all 152 episodes in a total of four boxsets sometime in 2010. However they released the latter 2 sets in 2011.
In 2009, William Winckler Productions produced six all new English dubbed movie versions edited from the original TV series. Producer William Winckler, known for Tekkaman: The Space Knight, wrote, produced and directed the English films, which are seen on broadband in Japan. The Winckler dubbed films focus on story arcs of the main characters of Shin, Ray, Souther, Toki, Raoh, and Kaioh. However these films are incredibly hard to find.

Quantum Vagina’s take - ATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATATAAAAAAA!
« Last Edit: September 11, 2013, 06:51:14 PM by Quantum Vagina »


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #20 on: September 11, 2013, 06:57:26 PM »
#44 –The Super Mario Bros Super Show!
(28 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 – Quantum Vagina
Just TRY to convince me that the Mario Bros aren’t Plumbers from Brooklyn
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Release Date:  1984

Just the plagarism
The Super Mario Bros. Super Show! is an American television series based upon Nintendo's Super Mario Bros. and Super Mario Bros. 2 video games. It was originally broadcast via first-run syndication to mostly independent or Fox television stations from September 4, 1989, to December 1, 1989, with reruns continuing until September 6, 1991. The Family Channel picked up the series on September 23, 1991, and aired it until August 26, 1994. The show was produced by DiC Animation and was distributed by Viacom Enterprises in association with Nintendo. DHX Media, the successor company of Cookie Jar Entertainment and DiC, is the current distributor.

The first and last parts of each episode were live segments which showed Mario (WWE Hall of Famer Captain Lou Albano) and Luigi (Danny Wells) living in Brooklyn, where they would often be visited by celebrity guest stars. These parts were performed and filmed before a live studio audience. Some of the celebrity guest stars were popular television stars, such as Nedra Volz, Norman Fell, Donna Douglas, Eve Plumb, Vanna White, Jim Lange, Danica McKellar, Nicole Eggert, Clare Carey and Brian Bonsall or professional athletes such as Lyle Alzado, Magic Johnson, and WWE Hall of Famers Roddy Piper and Sgt. Slaughter. In one episode, Ernie Hudson appeared as a Slimebuster, a parody of his Ghostbusters persona Winston Zeddemore and on another occasion Mario and Luigi receive a visit from Inspector Gadget, performed live by Maurice LaMarche. There was also another episode with Cassandra Peterson as Elvira, Mistress of the Dark, but the episode was not included in the DVDs for some unexplained reason. In an interview for the first DVD release of the show, Lou Albano talked about filming these live action skits, which mainly involved he and Wells getting a central plot and mostly improvising the dialogue as they went along.

Each Super Mario Bros. cartoon served as the second segment of every show, following the introduction and first few minutes of the episode's live-action segment. The cartoon featured characters and situations based upon the NES games Super Mario Bros. and Super Mario Bros. 2, as well as several sound effects and musical cues from the two games. Each episode featured Mario, Luigi, Toad and Princess Toadstool defending the Mushroom Kingdom from the reptilian villain King Koopa, often in a movie or pop-culture parody. Getting into the spirit of these parodies, Koopa often used alter egos fitting the current theme.

The theme song for the cartoon segments revealed that the Super Mario Brothers were accidentally warped into the Mushroom Kingdom while working on a bathtub drain in Brooklyn. After traveling via the warp drain, the Super Mario Brothers defeated King Koopa's Koopa Troopas, saved Princess Toadstool and halted Koopa's plan to conquer the Mushroom Kingdom. At the beginning of every cartoon segment Mario recites an entry into his "Plumber's Log," a parody of the Captain's Log from Star Trek.


The cartoon marks an early appearance of Birdo as female, a change made after an odd description of Birdo was given in the manual of Super Mario Bros. 2. She has been female ever since.

The Super Mario Bros. cartoons aired four days a week, from Monday through Thursday.
The voice of Mario in this show most resembles the voice of Mario heard today, whereas Mario's voice in the Super Mario Bros. 3 and Super Mario World shows (voiced by Walker Boone) was lower and raspier.

Quantum Vagina’s take - Do the Mario, bitches.

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Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #21 on: September 11, 2013, 07:08:59 PM »
#43 –M.A.S.K.
(28 Points) 2 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 – ColeStratton
Did you mean M*A*S*H?
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Release Date:  1985

Just the plagarism
M.A.S.K. is an animated television series produced by the French-American DIC Enterprises, Inc and Kenner. The series was based on the M.A.S.K. action figures. It was animated in Asia by studios; KK C&D Asia, Studio Juno, Studio World, and Ashi Production.

A total of 75 syndicated episodes of M.A.S.K. were broadcast from 1985 to 1986. One of many cartoons produced during the 1980s as a vehicle for toy merchandising, M.A.S.K. (which is an acronym for the Mobile Armored Strike Kommand), was a hybrid of popular era cartoons G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero and The Transformers.

When originally broadcast, M.A.S.K. was the first closed-captioned series to air in first-run syndication.

Several episodes of the series were released under Karl-Lorimar's "Kideo Video" branding on VHS in the 1980s, with two episodes per tape. The "racing season" of the series would be distributed by Tempest Video. Several episodes were also released under the label M.A.S.K The Movie, and M.A.S.K The Movie II. No true direct-to-video or theatrical M.A.S.K movie was ever made.

M.A.S.K. episodes have been released on DVD in three languages.

English (U.S.): Shout! Factory and FremantleMedia North America acquired the Region 1 DVD rights to the first season of the original series (65 episodes) of the series in 2011 and released a Complete Series set on August 9, 2011, as well as a separate 2-Disc collection of the first 11 episodes. The second season, which consists of 10 episodes, are owned by Cookie Jar Entertainment and are not part of the acquisition.[5] This also officially marks the first time that a DIC Entertainment/LBS Communications co-production will be owned by LBS Communications succeder FremantleMedia.

English (UK): Collection 1 was released in the UK in November 2007 by Jetix Films - Maximum Entertainment, containing the same amount of episodes as the Australian set. Collection 1 was re-released on the 31st August 2009, and Collection 2 was finally released on the 28th September 2009. Both sets (The re-issue Collection 1 and Collection 2) are distributed through Lace DVD, replacing Maximum Entertainment, and both sets are in Region 2 PAL format. All 75 episodes were released across both sets.

English (Australia/New Zealand): Madman Entertainment released the complete series over two DVD collections for the first time in Australia and New Zealand. Collection 1 was released in November 2006 and contains episodes 1 - 38, Collection 2 was released in March 2007 and contains episodes 39 - 75 which includes the season 2 episodes.

[Quantum Vagina’s take[/b] - I’ve seen ONE episode of this, and it was several years ago, but I’m pretty sure I was in love with the concept from the start. It is figuratively off the CHAIN.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #22 on: September 11, 2013, 07:21:14 PM »
#42 –Robotech
(28 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #11 – Johnny Unusual
Giant Robots Improve EVERYTHING
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Release Date:  1985

Just the plagarism
Robotech is an 85-episode science fiction anime adaptation produced by Harmony Gold USA in association with Tatsunoko Production Co., Ltd. and first released in the United States in 1985. It was adapted from three original Japanese television series. In the series, Robotechnology refers to the scientific advances discovered in an alien starship that crashed on a South Pacific island. With this technology, Earth developed robotic technologies, such as transformable mecha, to fight three successive extraterrestrial invasions.

Robotech was one of the first anime televised in the United States that attempted to include most of the complexity and drama of its original Japanese source material. Produced by Harmony Gold USA, Inc. in association with Tatsunoko Productions Co. Ltd., Robotech is a story adapted with edited content and revised dialogue from the animation of three different mecha anime series: The Super Dimension Fortress Macross from 1982, Super Dimension Cavalry Southern Cross from 1984, and Genesis Climber Mospeada from 1983. Harmony Gold's cited reasoning for combining these unrelated series was its decision to market Macross for American weekday syndication television, which required a minimum of 65 episodes at the time (thirteen weeks at five episodes per week). Macross and the two other series each had fewer episodes than required since they originally aired in Japan as a weekly series.

Robotech originally aired in 1985 in first-run syndication, meaning it was sold directly to local television stations without having been run on a network first—this was part of a trend in animation in the 1980s. Previously, local stations would rerun theatrical cartoons like Looney Tunes or shows that had previously aired on network TV on Saturday mornings. This changed after He-Man and the Masters of the Universe introduced a new economic model: shows sold directly for first-run to stations, driving and funded by sales of related toys. Though the original Robotech series did well in ratings, the attempt to cash in on toys may have doomed Robotech II: The Sentinels as the original series attracted older viewers, not necessarily the children targeted by the toy line. The failure of the Matchbox toy line is cited as a primary reason for the cancellation of the Sentinels series.

Quantum Vagina’s take - How have I lived 22 years and not seen OR heard of this? I LOVE giant robots. They’re amazing. I cite Code Geass as proof that anything can be improved with Giant Robots, since it’s basically Deathnote… with Giant Robots. As someone who plans on dying in a giant Mech one day, this series gets my thumbs up.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #23 on: September 11, 2013, 07:33:57 PM »
#41 –G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero
(28 Points) 5 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #10 – McDonald’s
Knowing is half the battle
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Release Date:  1983

Just the plagarism
G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero is a half-hour American animated television series based on the successful toyline from Hasbro and the comic book series from Marvel Comics. The cartoon had its beginnings with two five-part mini-series in 1983 and 1984, then became a regular series that ran in syndication from 1985 to 1986.

Ron Friedman created the G.I. Joe animated series for television, and wrote all four miniseries. The fourth mini-series was intended to be a feature film, but as noted subsequently was released as a television mini-series instead because of production difficulties

Following the initial two mini-series, the regular series began airing on September 16, 1985 concurrently in line with the second season of The Transformers, debuting with a third five-part story, The Pyramid of Darkness. A public safety lesson was usually featured at the end of each episode, using G.I. Joe characters in brief scenarios to impart safety tips to children. These lessons gave birth to the catchphrase: "And knowing is half the battle". The majority of the episodes centered around the relationship between Flint and Lady Jaye.

In each episode's opening title sequence voice actor Jackson Beck states that, "G.I. Joe is the code name for America's daring, highly-trained, Special Mission force. Its purpose: To defend human freedom against Cobra, a ruthless terrorist organization determined to rule the world".
Because the cartoons were produced as a vehicle to sell the toys, each episode typically focused on a particular G.I. Joe character.

In order to cut production costs for the animated series, Hasbro dropped Sunbow and contracted DiC to continue the series. Story editor Buzz Dixon explained in an interview: "Hasbro had been funding G.I. Joe out of their own pocket; they got a ridiculous deal from DiC to take over the series and they pretty much let them."

The DiC series is a continuation of the Sunbow show, though it chose to focus primarily on new characters of the period. Hawk was retained as G.I. Joe commander and at times shared his duties with Sgt. Slaughter as head of the G.I. Joe team. Captain Grid-Iron was given field commander duties in Season 1, with Duke regaining his old position in Season 2. Storm Shadow was also now a member of G.I. Joe, as he had been sold as a Joe rather than a Cobra since 1988, keeping in line with the story of the comics, where he had abandoned Cobra in 1986-87.
The first season centered almost exclusively on the 1990 Joes; meanwhile, Cobra, having a less extensive cast, was augmented by select characters from 1989 and the yet-to-be-released 1991 figures. This new ensemble had a much wider variety of Cobra Officers as viewers were introduced to the Night Creepers and their leader, and many different forms of Vipers.
The first season of the DiC series was mainly standalone episodes that focused on establishing new team members and plots. The second season of the DiC show lowered the animation budget but began a series of two part episodes, which often told a deeper story involving more dramatic life and death situations for the Joes. Theme song and underscore by Stephen James Taylor.

Also a casualty of the animation company changeover, was the extensive voice cast Sunbow employed, which largely consisted of voice actors employed by West Coast American companies. Because this DIC series was produced in Canada, an almost entirely new cast was assembled. Only a few actors from the Sunbow series returned for the DIC series; including Sgt. Slaughter, Chris Latta (the voice of Cobra Commander), Ed Gilbert (General Hawk) and Morgan Lofting (Baroness). But with Season 2, those holdover characters & actors were either retired or recast with new voices.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I probably overuse the word awesome, but this(these) show(shows) was(were) AWESOME, and not just because Sgt. Slaughter is a complete badass. I wish I was a kid in the 80’s. You guys got all the best toys. I had to deal with floam and crap like that.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #24 on: September 11, 2013, 07:40:24 PM »
#40 –The Flight of Dragons
(29 Points) 2 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #11 – Tripe H Redux
Knowing is half the battle
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Release Date:  1981

Just the plagarism
The Flight of Dragons is a 1981 animated film produced by Jules Bass and Arthur Rankin, Jr. and loosely combining the speculative natural history book of the same name (1979) by Peter Dickinson with the novel The Dragon and the George (1976) by Gordon R. Dickson. The film centres upon a quest undertaken to stop an evil wizard who plans to rule the world by dark magic. A major theme within the story is the question of whether science and magic can co-exist. This is told mostly through the experience of character Peter Dickinson, drawn from the 20th Century into the magical realm.

Released direct to video on August 17, 1982, it was aired as an ABC Channel 'Movie of the Week' in August 3, 1986, and released by Warner Brothers as a made-to-order DVD in the US on 17 November 2009 as part of the "Warner Archive Collection".
The opening song is sung by Don McLean.

Filmsy.com said of the film, "Animated fantasy films geared for family viewing just aren’t made like this anymore... The voice acting in this movie is excellent, to say the least... Though the animation might seem a bit “dated”, it remains beautiful by 1982 standards", "The dialogue is surprisingly intelligent and may confuse some children but it is nice to see an animated film that will stimulate adult minds a little... The voice cast are all great and I can’t find a single fault with any of them",[4] whilst 'The Unknown Movies' said "There may not be a strong constant thread in The Flight Of Dragons, but all its moments of warmth, imagination, and interest combine to make magic."

Other reviews were less positive: "I'm sure fans of The Flight of Dragons, sick of looking at crappy downloads or worn VHS copies, will be satisfied with what's here, but if you didn't grow up with this one, it's best left alone."

Quantum Vagina’s take - I’m torn. On one hand, I absolutely LOATHE Rankin/Bass Productions, minus Return of the King. On the other, Dragons, Harry Morgan, and Magic are all awesome.


Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #25 on: September 11, 2013, 07:40:44 PM »
#43 –M.A.S.K.
(28 Points) 2 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 – ColeStratton
Did you mean M*A*S*H?
Loved and owned most of the toys, found the show really underwhelming.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #26 on: September 11, 2013, 07:42:34 PM »
And that's today's entries. I forgot to give you some commercials yesterday, but I didn't tonight!

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Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #27 on: September 11, 2013, 09:08:08 PM »
I'm not all that fond of Fist of the North Star, but I've read it all and it's easy to see why the formula struck a cord: basically the hero arrives in a town where a low level despot is brutally murdering innocent peasants because he's a jerk, then the main character brutally murders that guy in return.  You doesn't want to see the bad guy get a comeuppance like erupting in a volcano of blood.  You know, for kids.  Seriously, this was printed in Weekly Shonen Jump, which was aimed at ages 13-18.  Not to mention that while rape never actually happens in the series, it's sure as hell threatened a lot.  Though there is still some gory series in Jump from time to time, they are never as perverse as in this series.

Robotech was pretty cool for it's time.  In the first story arc, it really put the opera back in space opera.  As in soap.  Space Soap Opera.  Episodes were just as often to be about character relationships and romance as it was jet-bots.  I was really into the idea of the bad guys inflitrating the humans and then going native and starting up relationship.

I really couldn't vote for GI Joe or the other show which will place... if I have to guess... 23rd place.  I'll guess that.  Anyway, I still think the toys are good, but while I loved it as a kid, I just don't really care.  One cool thing I do like about those shows is that they employed one of the most revolutionary American comics writer Steve Gerber.  In fact, considering his penchant for satire and ridiculous plots, I was surprised to learn that he DIDN'T write the Cold Slither or Destro's Grandma episodes.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #28 on: September 11, 2013, 09:17:00 PM »
Quantum Vagina’s take - I probably overuse the word awesome, but this(these) show(shows) was(were) AWESOME, and not just because Sgt. Slaughter is a complete badass. I wish I was a kid in the 80’s. You guys got all the best toys. I had to deal with floam and crap like that.

We also had caps.

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Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #29 on: September 13, 2013, 05:53:51 PM »
Sorry about the delay, everyone, I've been  messing with my machine all afternoon trying to get it stable, and managed to get it to a somewhat decent spot. I'm just going to run grab something to eat and then I'm going to post as many as I can get through tonight.