Author Topic: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters  (Read 33776 times)

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Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #60 on: December 21, 2011, 07:42:47 PM »
Isn't there anyone who knows all about


#34 - Jack Frost
?


Prof.Linus Van Pelt
Sure,  I can tell you all about

Lights, please: Jack Frost is a sprite-like character with roots in Viking lore. There, he is known as Jokul Frosti ("icicle frost"). In Britain and United States, Jack is a variant of Old Man Winter and is held responsible for frosty weather, for nipping the nose and toes in such weather, coloring the foliage in autumn, and leaving fernlike patterns on cold windows in winter. Although he has no connection with Christianity, he is sometimes hijacked to appear in modern secular Christmas entertainments, usually as a member of Santa Claus's entourage. He sometimes appears in literature, film, television, song, and video games as a sinister mischief maker.

In L. Frank Baum's The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus (1902), Jack Frost is the son of the otherwise unnamed Frost King. He takes pleasure in nipping "scores of noses and ears and toes," but Santa Claus, who likes Jack (who he sees as a "jolly rogue") though he mistrusts him, asks him to spare the children. Jack says he will, if he can resist the temptation. The same Jack appears in The Runaway Shadows, a short story by Baum. In this story, he has the power to freeze shadows, separating them from their owners, making them their own living entities.

In Laurell K. Hamilton's Meredith Gentry series, a character emerges as the original Jack Frost. Jack Frost has appeared as a minor character in the Rupert Bear stories, and in Jack of Fables the titular character became Jack Frost for a period of time. A second Jack Frost appears as the son of Jack Horner and The Snow Queen. In the Rainbow Magic books by Daisy Meadows, Jack Frost is an antagonist who wants to freeze Fairyland. He is accompanied by pesky goblins who steal fairies.

Jack Frost also appears in First Death in Nova Scotia, a poem by Elizabeth Bishop.
Jack appears in the novels Reaper Man and Hogfather by Terry Pratchett, The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman, and The Veil trilogy of novels by Christopher Golden.
In comic books, Jack Frost appears as a superhero in works published by Timely Comics (now Marvel Comics) in the 1940s. A man covered in ice, he could project ice and cold.

Jack Frost, a Russian film from 1964, has the Russian title Morozko — the Russian equivalent of Jack Frost. The film deals with Ivan (Eduard Izotov) and Nastenka (Natalya Sedykh), who go through the strangest situations to be with one another. Ivan is transformed by a Mushroom Pixie into a bear and is almost baked by an evil witch who controls trees. Nastenka is given the Cinderella treatment by her mother and her sister, who is jealous of her long braided hair. Jack Frost (Aleksandr Khvylya) himself doesn't appear until late in the movie.

Mike and the bots riff "But I'm nine!" for the part when Ivan proposes to Nastenka - and indeed the actress does look young. In case you are wondering, the actress Natalya Sedykh was born in 1948 and so she was 16 or 17 when she filmed this movie. Either way she's going to be turning 63 in 2011, so stop worrying.

The character of Jack Frost appears in three American films, two of them named simply Jack Frost. In one Jack Frost, a serial killer turns into a snowman and continues his rampage. This movie spawned a sequel: Jack Frost 2: Revenge of the Mutant Killer Snowman, also starring this version of Jack Frost. In the other Jack Frost film, Michael Keaton plays a human by the name of Jack Frost, who gets killed in a car-crash on Christmas Eve. A year later he returns as a snowman to spend time with his son. Jack Frost appears as the title character in a 1934 release of Ub Iwerks's ComiColor Cartoons, and Martin Short plays "Jack Frost" in The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause. In this film, Jack is jealous of the attention that Santa Claus receives and schemes to replace him.

Prior to the popularity of television, Jack Frost appeared in the children's radio serial The Cinnamon Bear. In television, Jack Frost (voiced by Paul Frees) makes an appearance in Frosty's Winter Wonderland where he grows jealous of Frosty the Snowman because of the attention the children lavish upon him. He tries to render Frosty lifeless by stealing his magic hat, but eventually has a change of heart when chosen as the best man at Frosty and Crystal's wedding. He reappears in Rudolph and Frosty's Christmas in July. In a Rankin-Bass Christmas TV special of 1979, Jack Frost, the title character (voiced by Robert Morse) falls in love with a human girl and seeks to become human. Father Winter grants his wish, but tells him that if he does not have a house, a horse, a bag of gold, and a wife by "the first sign of spring" he will become a sprite again.

Jack Frost is a character in video games including AdventureQuest, Killing Floor, City of Villains, Guild Wars, Granado Espada, and RuneScape. Frost also functions as a trademark character for the game-developer Atlus and as a mascot of the Megami Tensei series, like Persona 3, and Persona 4, where he appears as a persona of the magician arcana and, learns mainly bufu skills.

Jethro Tull and Saint Vitus both have songs alluding to Jack Frost. The radio station WRHS-FM 89.7 in Norridge, Illinois brands its holiday music format "Jack Frost". The name has been employed as a pseudonym by musicians Bob Dylan and Jack Dempsey. Jack Rosenberg (later known as "Werner Erhard") used it as a nickname while selling cars in Philadelphia in the 1950s.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/61cZW6HjesY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/61cZW6HjesY</a>

Festival: Solstice really, Winter in general, Yule I suppose
Total Points: 28
4/12 Lists
Highest Placement: 13 (wurwolf)
« Last Edit: December 21, 2011, 07:56:18 PM by Tripe H. Redux »


Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #61 on: December 21, 2011, 08:01:11 PM »
*And "FUCK" I just thought of the Wintersmith

Dammit, me too, having read you mention him. I love that book and the whole symbolic morris dance thing. It's awesome; it's essentially a folk tradition created from mostly scratch. Probably the best of the Tiffany books though I do like I Shall Wear Midnight a great deal.


Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #62 on: December 21, 2011, 08:01:49 PM »
Yay! Jack Frost!

And I actually quite like the MST3K of Jack Frost as well. 

Fuck yeah! Frost! Had him at #20.



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Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #63 on: December 21, 2011, 08:46:01 PM »
Isn't there anyone who knows all about


# 33- The Magi
?


Prof.Linus Van Pelt
Sure,  I can tell you all about

Lights, please: In the time of King Herod, after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea, wise men from the East came to Jerusalem, asking, "Where is the child who has been born king of the Jews? For we observed his star at its rising, and have come to pay him homage." When King Herod heard this, he was frightened, and all Jerusalem with him; and calling together all the chief priests and scribes of the people, he inquired of them where the Messiah was to be born. They told him, "In Bethlehem of Judea; for so it has been written by the prophet: 'And you, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah, are by no means least among the rulers of Judah; for from you shall come a ruler who is to shepherd my people Israel.'" Then Herod secretly called for the wise men and learned from them the exact time when the star had appeared. Then he sent them to Bethlehem, saying, "Go and search diligently for the child; and when you have found him, bring me word so that I may also go and pay him homage." When they had heard the king, they set out; and there, ahead of them, went the star that they had seen at its rising, until it stopped over the place where the child was. When they saw that the star had stopped, they were overwhelmed with joy. On entering the house, they saw the child with Mary his mother; and they knelt down and paid him homage. Then, opening their treasure chests, they offered him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. And having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod, they left for their own country by another path.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/BCVnuEWXQcg" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/BCVnuEWXQcg</a>

Festival: Christmas
Total Points: 32
2/12 Lists
Highest Placement: 4 (Tripe)


Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #64 on: December 21, 2011, 09:05:02 PM »
Isn't there anyone who knows all about


#32 - Zwarte Piet
?


Prof.Linus Van Pelt
Sure,  I can tell you all about Zwarte Piet

Lights, please: In the folklore and legends of the Netherlands and Belgium, Zwarte Piet (meaning Black Pete) is a companion of Saint Nicholas (Dutch: Sinterklaas) whose yearly feast in the Netherlands is usually celebrated on the evening of 5 December (Sinterklaas-avond, that is St. Nicolas Eve) and 6 December in Belgium, when they distribute sweets and presents to all good children.

The characters of Zwarte Pieten appear only in the weeks before Saint Nicholas's feast, first when the saint is welcomed with a parade as he arrives in the country (generally by boat, having traveled from Madrid, Spain). The tasks of the Zwarte Pieten are mostly to amuse children, and to scatter pepernoten, Kruidnoten and "strooigoed" (special sinterklaas-candies) for those who come to meet the saint as he visits stores, schools, and other places.

The first origin of Zwarte Piet can probably found by the god Wodan (often written as Odin). Riding the white horse Sleipnir he flew through the air and was the leader of the Wild Hunt. He was always accompanied by two black ravens, Huginn and Muninn. Those helpers would listen, just like Zwarte Piet, at the chimney - which was just a hole in the roof at that time - to tell Wodan about the good and bad behaviours of the mortals. During the Christianization, Pope Gregory I argued that conversions were easier if people were allowed to retain the outward forms of their traditions, while claiming that the traditions were in honour of the Christian God. Saint Nicolas tradition is one of them, converting Wodan to a Christian counterpart.

According to myths dating to the beginning of the 19th century, Saint Nicholas (Sinterklaas) operated by himself or in the companionship of a devil. Having triumphed over evil, it was said that on Saint Nicholas Eve, the devil was shackled and made his slave. A devil as a helper of the Saint can also still be found in Austrian Saint Nicholas tradition in the character of Krampus.

Some sources indicate that in Germanic Europe, Zwarte Piet originally was such a mastered devil forced to assist his captor, but the character emerged in the 19th century within the Netherlands as a companion of Saint Nicholas resembling a Moor. Saint Nicholas is said to come from Turkey. The relation of Zwarte Piet with Haji Firuz is incredibly close, Haji Firuz is a traditional herald of Nowruz, the Persian New Year celebration, exactly black in the face and comes with Amoo Nowruz a white bearded old man who brings gifts for the children counter part of Western Santa.

The introduction of this new Zwarte Piet was paired with a change in the attitude of the Sinterklaas character that was often shown as being quite rough against bad children himself and thought unbefitting of a Bishop by teachers and priests. Soon after the introduction of Zwarte Piet as Sinterklaas' helper, both characters adapted to a softer character.

Still, the lyrics of older traditional Sinterklaas songs warn that while Sinterklaas and his Zwarte Pieten will leave well-behaved children presents, they will punish those who have been very naughty. For example they will take bad children and carry these children off in a burlap sack to their homeland of Spain, where, according to legend, Sinterklaas and his Zwarte Pieten dwell out of season. These songs and stories also warned that a child who has been only slightly naughty will not get a present, but a "roe", which is a bundle of birch twigs, (as a warning they could have gotten a birching instead) or will simply receive a lump of coal instead of gifts.

Until the second half of the 20th century, Saint Nicholas' helper was not too bright, in line with the old colonial traditions. Once immigration started from the former colonised countries Zwarte Piet became a much more respected assistant of Saint Nicholas, who is often a bit inattentive, but playfull.

According to the more modern Saint Nicholas legend, a Zwarte Piet is a servant who accompanies Saint Nicholas on his holiday travels. In some versions, Saint Nicholas is said to have liberated a young slave named Peter, who decided to serve Nicholas. Zwarte Piet is today commonly depicted as a black person in the colorful pantaloons, feathered cap and ruffles of a Renaissance European page, a tradition that started based on a single illustration in a book published in 1850.
Zwarte Pieten are often portrayed as mischievous but rarely mean-spirited characters. The character is believed to have been derived from pagan traditions of evil spirits. Also told for decades is a story that the Zwarte Pieten are black because of chimney soot and/or in mockery of the darker Spanish occupiers of the Low Countries in centuries past.

During recent years the role of Zwarte Pieten has become part of a recurring debate in the Netherlands. Controversial practices include holiday revellers blackening their faces, wearing afro wigs, gold jewellery and bright red lipstick, and walking the streets throwing candy to passers-by.

Foreign tourists, particularly Americans and Brits, often experience culture shock upon encountering the character (to dress in blackface is considered offensive in the United States, the United Kingdom and other countries). Since the last decade of the 20th century there have been several attempts to introduce a new kind of Zwarte Piet to the Dutch population, where the Zwarte Pieten replaced their traditional black make-up with all sorts of colours. In 2006 the NPS (en: Dutch Programme Foundation) as an experiment replaced the black Pieten by rainbow-coloured Pieten, but in 2007 reverted to the traditional all-black Pieten.

The tradition continues to be popular in the Netherlands, though some activists have been moved to protest against it. Four people wearing t-shirts saying "Zwarte Piet is racist" were arrested in the second weekend of November 2011.

The largest Sinterklaas celebration in Western Canada, slated for 3 December 2011 in New Westminster, British Columbia, was cancelled for the first time since its inception in 1985 after clashes of opinion surrounding the traditional character Zwarte Piet or "Black Peter". Rather than leaving out Zwarte Piet, the organizers decided to cancel the festivities as a whole, because, as spokesperson Tako Slump of the organization said:

"We got a lot of replies back from our customers in the Dutch community," he said. "It became pretty clear to us that we love Sinterklaas and we can't have it without Black Peter. Those two go together,"

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/7x6OoY70_rA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/7x6OoY70_rA</a>

Festival: Sinterklaas-avond
Total Points: 33
3/12 Lists
Highest Placement: 8 (Tripe)


Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #65 on: December 21, 2011, 09:09:44 PM »
Oh and I think that's it for now, but I'll be back in a few hours with a double does of characters for those who like man's best friend.


Offline D.B. Barnes

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Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #67 on: December 21, 2011, 09:12:43 PM »
Yes indeedy, he's fascinatingly horrendous is he not?



Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #68 on: December 21, 2011, 09:20:06 PM »
What's interesting is that while that does inform the origin of Piet, the way he's portrayed in speech is often with a comedy Surinamese accent, so it's say like somebody British doing an exaggerated Jamaican accent or a French person doing a ludicrous Haitian accent. It's one of the most dodgy traditions but it's also fascinating due to that.
« Last Edit: December 21, 2011, 09:22:43 PM by Tripe H. Redux »


Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #69 on: December 22, 2011, 06:47:47 AM »
Isn't there anyone who knows all about


#31 - Olive, the Other Reindeer
?


Prof.Linus Van Pelt
Sure,  I can tell you all about Olive, the Other Reindeer.

Lights, please: Olive, the Other Reindeer is a CGI animated Christmas television special written by Steve Young, and directed by Oscar Moore. The feature was produced by Matt Groening's The Curiosity Company and animated by DNA Productions. It first aired on December 17, 1999 on Fox produced by 20th Century Fox Television, and Flower Films. The special combines paperlike character art in 3-D environments. Sometimes, traditional animation is used.

The story was based on the 1997 children's book by Vivian Walsh and illustrated by J. Otto Seibold. Drew Barrymore voices the titular character, and also featured are the voices of Dan Castellaneta, Peter MacNicol, Joe Pantoliano, Jay Mohr, Ed Asner, Tim Meadows, Billy West, and Michael Stipe.

The title is a pun on "All of the other reindeer", a line from the classic Christmas song Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.

The story follows a dog named Olive (voiced by Drew Barrymore), who does not act at all like a dog. When she returns home from some errands, she finds her owner, Tim (voiced by Jay Mohr), putting away Christmas decorations and announcing morosely that there "won't be any Christmas".

Olive eventually finds out that this is because Blitzen, one of Santa's reindeer, is injured and can not fly. Santa hopes he can make the Christmas run with "all of the other reindeer". Mishearing this on the radio as "Olive the other reindeer", Olive becomes convinced that it is she Santa is referring to, prompting her to travel to the North Pole to fill in on the sleigh team. On the way to the bus station, Olive runs into an evil mailman (voiced by Dan Castellaneta) who is fed up with the stress of having to deliver the heavy loads of mail during the Christmas rush. He is vengeful towards Santa for being repeatedly put on his "Naughty" list and is determined to stop Olive from saving Christmas. She then meets Martini, a con artist penguin (voiced by Joe Pantoliano).

After buying from him a "Rolexxx," Olive goes to the "Mauvehound" bus station to buy a ticket to Arctic Junction. Martini shows up, and Olive buys him a bus ticket out of pity. Before they can leave the station, Olive is captured by the evil mailman, who tells people that Olive is wanted on several counts of mail fraud, such as "licking self-adhesive stamps and not mailing early for the holidays". After pleading to Martini to help her, Martini rolls several pens along the ground, tripping up the mailman. Martini and Olive then catch the bus right before it leaves, with the mailman watching them drive away.

On the bus, Olive and Martini talk to the Eskimos (voiced by Billy West) and Richard Stans (voiced by Tim Meadows). They all believe Olive misheard Santa, but wish her luck anyway. The mailman pulls up next to the bus in his mail truck, but Martini fashions a paper airplane out of stationery and throws it at the mailman, knocking him off the road. When they arrive at Arctic Junction, there is a one-hour wait for the next bus, so they go inside the restaurant for some food. After failing to rally everyone to support Olive, they order some food. The group does not know that their waitress is really the mailman, dressed up with a blue wig and a nametag that reads "Flo." The mailman lures Olive outside, saying that Santa is going to give her a flying test. Then, once outside, he throws Olive inside his truck. While he is driving away, Olive finds a package addressed to her from "Deus Ex Machina." The package is a metal file Olive uses to escape.

Back at the Junction, Richard says he can not give Olive and Martini a ride, because he is needed at the depot, and does not want to lose his job. The two go inside the Top of the World Bar, and are initially harassed by Round John Virgin and Schnitzel, Blitzen's flightless cousin. They apologize for their behavior and Round John Virgin offers Martini and Olive a ride to the North Pole in his vehicle, named The Polar Express. At the North Pole, Olive is denied entrance to see Santa, but Martini gives the guard a watch as if it was a gift from Santa. When the guard asks Martini to fix it, he says he needs to kill the alarm, because the electromagnetic waves will interfere with the signal from a satellite. Olive digs under the fence, and proceeds to find Santa. Besides Blitzen's injury, he's not sure he wants to go out on Christmas Eve, because he's received mean-spirited letters from some children. Olive convinces him that the mean letters from children are really from the mailman, since they have no postmark, and is put with the other reindeer to fly Santa's sleigh.

Before they leave, the mailman switches the toy bag with his own bag of junk mail and kidnaps Martini. After the sleigh lands at the first house and Olive realizes what has happened, Olive uses the mailman's scent to track him and scares the mailman out of his wits as he thinks Olive is a Ghost. Martini uses a jack-in-the-box to scare the mailman, who hits the window and is knocked unconscious. They retrieve the presents and rescue Martini, and then deliver the presents to the world

Lost in a fog, Olive guides them back to the North Pole by smelling the gingerbread cookies Ms. Claus baked. As a present, Olive is given a pair of antlers to wear. She goes home and makes amends with Tim, who is glad that she does not care if she is different from other dogs.

Meantime, bound with packing tape and cardboard wings, the mailman is put in the penguin exhibit in the zoo in place of Martini, and Martini becomes the new mailman, while everyone enjoys Christmas Day.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/7QfdLbpITc0" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/7QfdLbpITc0</a>

Festival: Christmas
Total Points: 34
3/12 Lists
Highest Placement: 9 (Anais)


Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #70 on: December 22, 2011, 07:15:04 AM »

#31 - Olive, the Other Reindeer
?

Festival: Christmas
Total Points: 34
3/12 Lists
Highest Placement: 9 (Anais)

Completely forgot about Olive. I think the one drawback to this list was the complete lack of those big example lists that are so good for jogging one's memory about such things.
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Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #71 on: December 22, 2011, 07:43:41 AM »
Yes, you'd think, given the universality of solstice centred festivals, that there would be a good list somewhere but there really wasn't.


Offline D.B. Barnes

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #72 on: December 22, 2011, 07:48:44 AM »
Yes, you'd think, given the universality of solstice centred festivals, that there would be a good list somewhere but there really wasn't.

Seriously, when this list is done, it'll be the most comprehensive holiday character list on the innerwebs.
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Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #73 on: December 22, 2011, 12:26:26 PM »
Isn't there anyone who knows all about


#30 - Max, the Grinch's dog
?


Prof.Linus Van Pelt
Sure, I can tell you all about Max, the Grinch's dog

but I think I'll save it for
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/6S3KM92s-pg" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/6S3KM92s-pg</a>

Festival: Christmas
Total Points: 35
3/12 Lists
Highest Placement: 12 (Johnny Unusual)


Offline a pretty girl is like

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Re: LOC 55: The Top 51 Winter Holiday Characters
« Reply #74 on: December 22, 2011, 12:31:52 PM »
Isn't there anyone who knows all about


# 33- The Magi
?


Prof.Linus Van Pelt
Sure,  I can tell you all about

Lights, please: In the time of King Herod, after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea, wise men from the East came to Jerusalem, asking, "Where is the child who has been born king of the Jews? For we observed his star at its rising, and have come to pay him homage." When King Herod heard this, he was frightened, and all Jerusalem with him; and calling together all the chief priests and scribes of the people, he inquired of them where the Messiah was to be born. They told him, "In Bethlehem of Judea; for so it has been written by the prophet: 'And you, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah, are by no means least among the rulers of Judah; for from you shall come a ruler who is to shepherd my people Israel.'" Then Herod secretly called for the wise men and learned from them the exact time when the star had appeared. Then he sent them to Bethlehem, saying, "Go and search diligently for the child; and when you have found him, bring me word so that I may also go and pay him homage." When they had heard the king, they set out; and there, ahead of them, went the star that they had seen at its rising, until it stopped over the place where the child was. When they saw that the star had stopped, they were overwhelmed with joy. On entering the house, they saw the child with Mary his mother; and they knelt down and paid him homage. Then, opening their treasure chests, they offered him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. And having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod, they left for their own country by another path.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/BCVnuEWXQcg" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/BCVnuEWXQcg</a>

Festival: Christmas
Total Points: 32
2/12 Lists
Highest Placement: 4 (Tripe)


Did you lump my vote in for Balthazar with this, Tripe? 
I'm all out for kicks...and every inch of me spells EXCITEMENT!