Author Topic: LoC 50 - Top Video Games of the '80s (And before!) - Today's High Scores  (Read 36221 times)

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Offline goflyblind

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Offline Pak-Man

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Yeah. Sorry they were a little late today, but my mom's in town and kept me all morning. Back to the list!

#25 – Centipede

(64 Points) 6 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - Tyrant


Commercial:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/C6CtL-Ulkqk?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/C6CtL-Ulkqk?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

Release Date:  1980

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Centipede is a vertically-oriented shoot 'em up arcade game produced by Atari, Inc. in 1980. The game was designed by Ed Logg along with Dona Bailey, one of the few female game programmers in the industry at this time. It was also the first arcade coin-operated game to have a significant female player base. The player defends against swarms of insects, completing a round after eliminating the centipede that winds down the playing field.

The player is represented by a small, "somewhat humanoid head" at the bottom of the screen (Later described as being a garden gnome in the trivia section of the cell phone interpretation). The player moves the character about the bottom area of the screen with a trackball and fires laser shots at a centipede advancing from the top of the screen down through a field of mushrooms. Shooting any section of the centipede creates a mushroom; shooting one of the middle segments splits the centipede into two pieces at that point. Each piece then continues independently on its way down the board, with the first section of the rear piece becoming a new head. If the head is destroyed, the section behind it becomes the next head.
 
The centipede starts at the top of the screen, traveling either left or right. When it hits a mushroom or the edge of the screen, it drops one level and switches direction. Thus, more mushrooms on the screen cause the centipede to descend more rapidly. The player can destroy mushrooms by shooting them, but each takes four hits to destroy.
 
If the centipede reaches the bottom of the screen, it moves back and forth within the player area and one-segment "head" centipedes are periodically added. This continues until the player has eliminated both the original centipede and all heads. When all the centipede's segments are destroyed, a new centipede forms at the top of the screen. Every time a centipede is eliminated, however, the next one is one segment shorter and is accompanied by one additional, fast-moving "head" centipede. A player loses a life when hit by a centipede or another enemy, such as a spider or a flea. The flea leaves mushrooms behind when fewer than five are in the player area, though the number required increases with level of difficulty. Spiders move across the player area in a zig-zag fashion and occasionally eat some of the mushrooms.

Scorpions poison every mushroom they touch, but these never appear in the player's movement region. A centipede touching a poisoned mushroom hurtles straight toward the player's area. Upon reaching the player's area, the centipede returns to normal behavior.

Pak's Thoughts: OK. So I have a phobia of centipedes. Tyrant doesn't, and this phobia has resulted in some most unmasculine behavior when one happens to crawl into our house. (We have BIG suckers here in NM too. Like- 5 inches long or more.)

Tell you that to tell you this: When going through the image search engines looking for TRON screenshots and ads, I was treated to incidental photos of Olivia Wilde in a skin-tight suit. Woo! Bonus. While going through the images for Centipede, I was treated to visions pulled from my darkest nightmares. You win some, you lose some, is the moral of this story, I suppose.

Now I have no phobia of the arcade classic and have spent many hours on my VIC-20 gleefully blowing away chunks of Centipede. Tyrant puts me to shame, though. I'm here to tell you that as a gamer, you can never be more in love with your wife than you are after you've watched her go through like- 30 stages of Centipede. I am a lucky man. I bet Olivia Wilde can only beat like- one level. :^)


Offline Pak-Man

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#24 – Asteroids

(68 Points) 5 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 - RVR II


Commercial:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/3aHaWloD0Js?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/3aHaWloD0Js?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

Release Date:  1979

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Asteroids is a video arcade game released in 1979 by Atari Inc. It was one of the most popular and influential games of the Golden Age of Arcade Games. Asteroids uses a vector display and a two-dimensional view that wraps around in both screen axes. The player controls a spaceship in an asteroid field which is periodically traversed by flying saucers. The object of the game is to shoot and destroy asteroids and saucers while not colliding with either, or being hit by the saucers' counter-fire.

The game was conceived by Lyle Rains and programmed and designed by Ed Logg. It was implemented on hardware developed by Howard Delman. Asteroids was a hit in the United States and became Atari's best selling game of all time. Atari had been in the process of manufacturing another vector game, Lunar Lander, but demand for Asteroids was so high "that several hundred Asteroids games were shipped in Lunar Lander cabinets." Asteroids was so popular that video arcade operators sometimes had to install larger boxes to hold the number of coins that were spent by players.
 
Asteroids is also the first game to use Atari's "QuadraScan" vector-refresh system; a full-color version known as "Color-QuadraScan" was later developed for games such as Space Duel and Tempest.

The objective of Asteroids is to score as many points as possible by destroying asteroids and flying saucers. The player controls a triangular-shaped ship that can rotate left and right, fire shots straight forward, and thrust forward. As the ship moves, momentum is not conserved — the ship eventually comes to a stop again when not thrusting. The player can also send their ship into hyperspace, causing it to disappear and reappear in a random location on the screen (with the risk of self-destructing or appearing on top of an asteroid).
 
Each stage starts with a few asteroids drifting in random directions on the screen. Objects wrap around screen edges — for instance, an asteroid that drifts off the top edge of the screen reappears at the bottom and continues moving in the same direction. As the player shoots asteroids, they break into smaller asteroids that frequently move faster and are more difficult to hit. Smaller asteroids also score higher points. Periodically, a flying saucer appears on one side of the screen and moves across to the other before disappearing again. The saucers are of two kinds: Large saucers fire in random directions, while small saucers aim at the player's ship.
 
The minimalist soundtrack features a memorable deep-toned electronic "heartbeat", which quickens as the asteroid density is reduced by the player's fire.
 
Once the screen has been cleared of all asteroids and flying saucers, a new set of large asteroids appears. The number of asteroids increases each round up to a maximum of 12. The game is over when the player has lost all of his/her lives.
 
Like many games of its time, Asteroids contains several bugs that were mostly the result of the original programmers underestimating the game's popularity or the skill of its players. The maximum possible score in this game is 99,990 points, after which it "rolls over" back to zero. Other common terms for this bug were "turn over" and "flip over". Also, an oversight in the small saucer's programming gave rise to a popular strategy known as "lurking" — because the saucer could only shoot directly at the player's position on the screen, the player could "hide" at the opposite end of the screen and shoot across the screen boundary, while remaining relatively safe. Another popular method of exploiting this bug was to simply use thrust to keep the ship in motion with 1 or 2 asteroids in the play field, allowing the player to pick off as many 1,000 point UFOs as possible. This led to experienced players being able to play indefinitely on a single credit. This oversight was addressed in the game's sequel, Asteroids Deluxe, and led to significant changes in the way game developers designed and tested their games in the future.

Pak's Thoughts: Asteroids was a good investment, quarter-wise. Most arcade games do their best to burn through 25 cents every 5 minutes or so, but if you know what you're doing in a game of asteroids, 25 cents can kill a good 15 minutes or more.

It's funny how some games just transport you back to a certain point in your life. When my family was in the process of first moving to New Mexico, we had to stay in a hotel and search for houses all day long, which is absolute boredom for a boy in his early teens. My one saving grace was the Asteroids machine they had down in the lobby. Throughout the trip I burned through about $10 in quarters playing Asteroids in-between house-hunts. Ever since then, Asteroids has reminded me of my first time in New Mexico.


Offline Pak-Man

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#23 – Oregon Trail

(69 Points) 4 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 (Of 12) - James of LinHood


Box Art:



Release Date:  1971

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

The Oregon Trail is a computer game originally developed by Don Rawitsch, Bill Heinemann, and Paul Dillenberger in 1971 and produced by the Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium (MECC) in 1974. The original game was designed to teach school children about the realities of 19th century pioneer life on the Oregon Trail. The player assumes the role of a wagon leader guiding his party of settlers from Independence, Missouri, to Oregon's Willamette Valley over the Oregon Trail via a Conestoga wagon in 1848. The game has been released in many editions since the original release by various developers and publishers who have acquired rights to it.

The Oregon Trail was created in 1971 by three student teachers at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, in the HP Time-Shared BASIC environment running on an HP 2100 minicomputer. One of these students, senior Don Rawitsch, had the idea to create a computer program for a history class he was teaching, and recruited two of his friends, Paul Dillenberger and Bill Heinemann, both of whom were students teaching math, to help.
 
The Oregon Trail debuted to Rawitsch's class on 3 December 1971. Despite bugs, the game was immediately popular, and he made it available to others on Minneapolis Public Schools' time-sharing service. When the next semester ended, however, Rawitsch deleted the program, although he printed out a copy of the source code.

In 1974 Rawitsch took a job at Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium (MECC), a state-funded organization that developed educational software for the classroom. He added many historically accurate features and uploaded The Oregon Trail into the organization's time-sharing network, where it could be accessed by schools across Minnesota. The game became one of the network's most popular programs, with thousands of players monthly.
 
In 1978 MECC began encouraging its schools to adopt the Apple II microcomputer. The first published version of The Oregon Trail was in Creative Computing's May-June 1978 issue. It was written in BASIC 3.1 for the CDC Cyber 70/73-26. The program was then adapted by John Cook for the Apple II, and provided on A.P.P.L.E.'s PDS Disk series #108. A further version called Oregon Trail 2 was adapted in June, 1978 by J.P. O'Malley. The game was further released as part of MECC's Elementary series, on Elementary Volume 6 in 1980. The game was titled simply Oregon, and featured minimal graphics. It proved so popular that it was re-released as a standalone game, with substantially improved graphics, in 1985. By 1995 The Oregon Trail comprised about one third of MECC's $30 million in annual revenue.
 
An updated version, Oregon Trail Deluxe, was released for DOS in 1992, followed by Oregon Trail II in 1995, The Oregon Trail 3rd Edition in 1997, and 4th and 5th editions. As of 2011, more than 65 million copies of The Oregon Trail have been sold.


Pak's Thoughts: It's good to see a little edutainment on the list. I became hooked on this game the way I think everyone who was hooked on this game got hooked on this game - 5th period computer lab. Back in the '80s, schools (At least MY school) were really perplexed about what to do with their computer labs. They sure didn't have anyone who knew how to program one on staff, so they didn't know what to do except park us in front of an Apple II for an hour every day and give us a library of educational games to play. At my school it was pretty much this or Carmen Sandiego. Of course since you could name the whole crew, groups of 4 kids would gather around one screen to see what would happen to them. My virtual self must have had a penchant for drinking out of every puddle he could find because I always seemed to be the one to come down with dysentery or cholera.


Offline Pak-Man

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#22 – Duck Hunt

(69 Points) 7 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - 2 #8s - Doctor Who? Rattrap007


Box Art:



Release Date:  April 21, 1984

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Duck Hunt is a video game for the Nintendo Famicom/Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) game console system in which players use the NES Zapper to shoot ducks (or Mallard drakes to be exact) on screen for points. The game was developed and published by Nintendo, and was released in 1984 in Japan. The ducks appear one or two at a time, and the player is given three shots to shoot them down.
 
Duck Hunt was one of the two original pack-in titles for the first release of the game system. The game was not initially reviewed often, but given mediocre critical praise and positive gamer reaction. Prior to the NES version, Nintendo also made a Duck Hunt game based on Laser Clay Shooting System released in 1976.

In Duck Hunt, players use the Nintendo Zapper Light Gun and attempt to shoot down either ducks or clay pigeons in mid-flight. Duck Hunt was also released as an arcade game in 1984, as Vs. Duck Hunt, and is included in the PlayChoice-10 arcade console.
 
The game has three modes:
 One Duck – In each round, there are 10 ducks for the player to shoot down. Only one duck appears on screen at a time, and the player has three shots to hit it.
 Two Ducks – Identical to "One Duck" except that the ducks appear on screen in pairs. A new pair of ducks will not appear until both of the previous pair have either escaped or been shot down.
 Clay Shooting – In each round, there are 10 clay pigeons for the player to shoot down. Clay pigeons are fired off two at a time from a first person perspective and are aimed into the distance. In Vs. Duck Hunt, Clay Shooting mode appears as the second round with the first round being the two duck variation (the arcade version never had one duck).
 
In the first two modes, a dog retrieves the ducks a player shoots, and laughs at the player if both of the birds on screen escape (and if the player fails to advance to the next level).
 
During bonus stages in Vs. Duck Hunt the dog jumps out from the grass as a distraction to the player as they try to shoot ducks, thus putting himself in the line of fire and enabling a player to inadvertently shoot him. If the dog is shot, the bonus round ends.
 
Several unofficial remakes of Duck Hunt have been released which enable the player to shoot the dog. The nameless dog makes a cameo appearance in the NES game Barker Bill's Trick Shooting (another Zapper game) and he can be shot. A remake is included in the Homebrew Channel for Wii.
 
While Duck Hunt does not have a traditional multiplayer mode, the manual states that a second player may plug in a standard NES controller in the other controller port and control the duck that appears. This option is only possible in the one duck mode.

Since appearing in Duck Hunt, the dog has become an icon to gaming, as well as a symbol of annoyance. IGN described him as the bane of their existence, including him in their "Annoying Character Hall of Fame", calling him the "most annoying pooch they couldn't kill." IGN editor Lucas M. Thomas listed the dog as a character he would like to see in Super Smash Bros. Brawl, calling him the most despised animal character in Nintendo history. GamesRadar listed him as the most annoying sidekick ever, discussing how as opposed to introducing interesting characters, they used the dog as a character who would mock their failures. However, they added that without him, Duck Hunt would be less of an icon. However, they also listed him as the seventh best canine companion, stating that they think that he is laughing with the player, as opposed to at the player. Cracked listed the dog as the most annoying video game character from an otherwise great game, calling him the single most hated character in video game history. They also listed him as one of Nintendo's best villains.
 
Andy Slaven, author of Video Game Bible: 1985-2002, described Duck Hunt as being a quality game except for the fact that you could not shoot the dog. 1UP.com listed him as the seventh best dog in video games, stating that even though he is annoying, he is ballsy enough to laugh at someone with a loaded rifle. GameDaily listed the dog as the third greatest in-game moment. listed the dog as one of the most unappreciated Nintendo characters. They stated that while dogs are man's best friend, that if the dog from Duck Hunt is man's best friend, they'd hate to meet their enemy. They also included him in their list of characters they wish they could kill, stating that almost everyone they talked to, even dog lovers, wanted to shoot him. In another GameDaily article, they state that the goal of the game was not just to shoot all of the ducks, but to avoid being laughed at by the dog. Nintendo Power listed the dog as one of the things they love to hate, stating that there isn't a Duck Hunt player in the world who hasn't wanted to shoot him. GameSpy listed the dog as the 10th favourite dog in video games, stating that while a dog in real life doesn't judge its master, the Duck Hunt dog unfortunately is not like that.
 
UGO.com listed the ability to kill the dog as one of the best video game urban legends, stating that it is one of the few video game urban legends based in actual truth, since players could shoot the dog in the arcade Vs. Duck Hunt. MTV Multiplayer conducted two awards that included the Duck Hunt dog; the "Greatest Video Game Canine" and "Greatest Video Game Animal" awards. The Duck Hunt dog tied for first in the reader poll with four other characters - K.K. Slider from Animal Crossing, Amaterasu from Ōkami, and Sam from Sam & Max. Brian Crecente of Kotaku listed him as his third favourite, stating that the dog's art style and attitude reminded him of Fred Avery cartoons from the 1940s. Humorist Tofuburger listed him as his third favourite as well, stating that anyone who has played Duck Hunt will tell stories of broken TVs, controllers, and NESes due to the dog. Official Nintendo Magazine listed him as the eighth greatest Nintendo moment, describing him as being smug and stating that they loath him. Video game developer Mastiff referenced the Duck Hunt dog in promoting their video game Remington Great American Bird Hunt, stating that Rockford, a dog in the game, will never laugh at players for missing the ducks.

Pak's Thoughts: The last 3 paragraphs of the "Stuff I wiki'd" section were from one section in the Wikipedia entitled "Cultural Impact." That's the entire section, too. I find it very amusing that the entire cultural impact of Duck Hunt, according to Wikipedia, is that people really want to shoot that dog. :^)

Of course the star of the show back in the day was really the light gun. In this world of Wii-motes and Kinnects, it's hard to impress just how groundbreaking it was to be able to fire a gun at the screen and have the game detect whether you hit it or not. Of course once I got it on my NES, it didn't take long to figure out that I could just hold up the gun against the screen and shoot the ducks point blank.


Offline Pak-Man

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#21 – Ms. Pac-Man

(69 Points) 6 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - 4  - Tyrant


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Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Release Date:  April 21, 1981

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Ms. Pac-Man is an arcade video game produced by Midway as an unauthorized sequel to Pac-Man. It was released in North America in 1981 and became one of the most popular video games of all time, leading to its adoption by Pac-Man licensor Namco as an official title. This game introduces a female protagonist, new maze designs and several minor gameplay changes over the original game.

The gameplay of Ms. Pac-Man is largely identical to that of the original Pac-Man. The player gathers points by eating dots and avoiding ghosts (contact with one loses a life). Power-pellets or energizers change the ghosts, which reverse their course and can be eaten for bonus points. Fruit bonuses can be consumed for increasing point values, twice per level. As the levels increase, the speed and difficulty increase as well.
 
There are, however, some notable differences:
- The game has four different mazes that appear in different sets of colors.
- Most of the new mazes have two sets of warp tunnels.
- Unlike the original Pac-Man, the spaces in between the walls are filled in, making it easier to see where the path is.
- The ghosts' behavior patterns are different and include semi-random movement, precluding the use of patterns to beat each level.
- Instead of appearing in the center of the maze, fruits bounce around the maze, entering and leaving through the warp tunnels. Once all fruits have been encountered, they appear in random sequence for the rest of the game.
- The orange ghost's name is Sue instead of Clyde.
- The three intermissions have changed to follow the developing relationship between Pac-Man and Ms. Pac-Man (from when they first meet to having a stork drop off their baby).
- The sound effects and music of the game are very different from the Pac-Man sounds.
 
As in Pac-Man, the game has a bug in the subroutine that draws the fruit, which renders the 256th level unplayable. However, the game also has other bugs that cause it to crash or become unplayable much sooner, making it impossible to reach the 256th level without an emulator.

Pak's Thoughts: The placement of this game on my list required a lot of soul searching. On the one hand, Pac-Man is PAC-MAN. It was the heart of the phenominon we called Pac-Man fever, and Ms. Pac-Man was just riding on his coattails. On the other hand,  Ms. Pac-Man is the superior game in pretty much every way. The levels change every couple stages and the ghosts are a bit less predictable. I won't tell you which one I scored higher, but I pass the question on to you: What's more important? The game that started it all, or the game that refined it?

And that does it for today! The top 20 starts tomorrow!


Offline RVR II

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#24 – Asteroids

(68 Points) 5 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 - RVR II


Commercial:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/3aHaWloD0Js?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/3aHaWloD0Js?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

Release Date:  1979

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Asteroids is a video arcade game released in 1979 by Atari Inc. It was one of the most popular and influential games of the Golden Age of Arcade Games. Asteroids uses a vector display and a two-dimensional view that wraps around in both screen axes. The player controls a spaceship in an asteroid field which is periodically traversed by flying saucers. The object of the game is to shoot and destroy asteroids and saucers while not colliding with either, or being hit by the saucers' counter-fire.

The game was conceived by Lyle Rains and programmed and designed by Ed Logg. It was implemented on hardware developed by Howard Delman. Asteroids was a hit in the United States and became Atari's best selling game of all time. Atari had been in the process of manufacturing another vector game, Lunar Lander, but demand for Asteroids was so high "that several hundred Asteroids games were shipped in Lunar Lander cabinets." Asteroids was so popular that video arcade operators sometimes had to install larger boxes to hold the number of coins that were spent by players.
 
Asteroids is also the first game to use Atari's "QuadraScan" vector-refresh system; a full-color version known as "Color-QuadraScan" was later developed for games such as Space Duel and Tempest.

The objective of Asteroids is to score as many points as possible by destroying asteroids and flying saucers. The player controls a triangular-shaped ship that can rotate left and right, fire shots straight forward, and thrust forward. As the ship moves, momentum is not conserved — the ship eventually comes to a stop again when not thrusting. The player can also send their ship into hyperspace, causing it to disappear and reappear in a random location on the screen (with the risk of self-destructing or appearing on top of an asteroid).
 
Each stage starts with a few asteroids drifting in random directions on the screen. Objects wrap around screen edges — for instance, an asteroid that drifts off the top edge of the screen reappears at the bottom and continues moving in the same direction. As the player shoots asteroids, they break into smaller asteroids that frequently move faster and are more difficult to hit. Smaller asteroids also score higher points. Periodically, a flying saucer appears on one side of the screen and moves across to the other before disappearing again. The saucers are of two kinds: Large saucers fire in random directions, while small saucers aim at the player's ship.
 
The minimalist soundtrack features a memorable deep-toned electronic "heartbeat", which quickens as the asteroid density is reduced by the player's fire.
 
Once the screen has been cleared of all asteroids and flying saucers, a new set of large asteroids appears. The number of asteroids increases each round up to a maximum of 12. The game is over when the player has lost all of his/her lives.
 
Like many games of its time, Asteroids contains several bugs that were mostly the result of the original programmers underestimating the game's popularity or the skill of its players. The maximum possible score in this game is 99,990 points, after which it "rolls over" back to zero. Other common terms for this bug were "turn over" and "flip over". Also, an oversight in the small saucer's programming gave rise to a popular strategy known as "lurking" — because the saucer could only shoot directly at the player's position on the screen, the player could "hide" at the opposite end of the screen and shoot across the screen boundary, while remaining relatively safe. Another popular method of exploiting this bug was to simply use thrust to keep the ship in motion with 1 or 2 asteroids in the play field, allowing the player to pick off as many 1,000 point UFOs as possible. This led to experienced players being able to play indefinitely on a single credit. This oversight was addressed in the game's sequel, Asteroids Deluxe, and led to significant changes in the way game developers designed and tested their games in the future.

Pak's Thoughts: Asteroids was a good investment, quarter-wise. Most arcade games do their best to burn through 25 cents every 5 minutes or so, but if you know what you're doing in a game of asteroids, 25 cents can kill a good 15 minutes or more.

It's funny how some games just transport you back to a certain point in your life. When my family was in the process of first moving to New Mexico, we had to stay in a hotel and search for houses all day long, which is absolute boredom for a boy in his early teens. My one saving grace was the Asteroids machine they had down in the lobby. Throughout the trip I burned through about $10 in quarters playing Asteroids in-between house-hunts. Ever since then, Asteroids has reminded me of my first time in New Mexico.

Nuther one I kicked ass-teroids at back in the day 8)


Offline D.B. Barnes

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#22 – Duck Hunt

(69 Points) 7 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - 2 #8s - Doctor Who? Rattrap007

Good lord, how could I forgotten Duck Hunt?!?

My brain doesn't work right anymore.
VIVA IL ESORDIO DEL DIABETE ADULTO DUCE!!!


Offline sarcasm_made_Easy

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See i added duck hunt but i added it as super mario/duck hunt combo. 


Offline Johnny Unusual

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It didn't make it on mine, but Duck Hunt is certainly a classic.  I just thought that while it was fun and cool, it didn't have quite enough to make my list.  Damn dog.


MontyServo

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See i added duck hunt but i added it as super mario/duck hunt combo. 

I listed them as separate games even though I too had that combo pack.


Offline Rattrap007

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Duck Hunt, Asteroids, Oregon Trail and Centipede (The non-human variety) were all on my list.





Offline Pak-Man

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#20 – Dig Dug

(71 Points) 6 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - 2 - RVR II


Commercial:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/WmFZnpnur4U?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/WmFZnpnur4U?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>
Do the Dig Dug Dance!

Release Date:  1982

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Dig Dug is an arcade game developed and published by Namco in Japan in 1982 for Namco Galaga hardware. It was later published outside of Japan by Atari. A popular game based on a simple concept, it was also released as a video game on many consoles.

The objective of Dig Dug is to eliminate underground-dwelling monsters by inflating them until they pop, or by dropping rocks on them. There are two kinds of enemies in the game: Pookas, round red monsters (said to be modeled after tomatoes) who wear yellow goggles, and Fygars, green dragons who can breathe fire. The player's character is Dig Dug, dressed in white and blue, and able to dig tunnels through destructible environments. Dig Dug is killed if he is caught by either Pooka or Fygar, burned by a Fygar's fire, or crushed by a rock.
 
If left partially inflated, the monster will deflate and recover after a few seconds, and the player can also pass through the enemy while it is deflating.
 
The monsters normally crawl through the tunnels in the dirt but can turn into ghostly eyes and travel slowly through the dirt. The last enemy on a level will try to escape off the top left of the screen.
 
More points are awarded for eliminating an enemy further down in the dirt (the levels are color coded), and the Fygar is worth more points if it is inflated horizontally facing the player rather than inflated horizontally opposing the player or inflated vertically (because it only breathes fire horizontally). More points are also awarded for dropping rocks on enemies in order to eliminate them rather than inflating them. If one enemy is killed by the rock, it is worth 1000 points. The next two add 1500 points each and any after that they add 2000. The act of digging is itself worth points, giving ten points for each block dug, so some players do as much of it as possible in situations where the threat from the remaining monsters is minimal.
 
After the player drops two rocks, fruits and vegetables (and other edible bonus items, such as Galaxian flagships) appear in the center of the play field, and can be collected for points if the player is able to reach them before they disappear. These edible bonus items will appear even if the rocks fail to hit any enemies. In some versions of the game, the most points attainable from a single bonus fruit is 8,000 from the pineapple.
 
If the player drops a rock on a foe at the same time he pumps it to death, a glitch will occur whereupon all enemies will promptly disappear, but the game will not progress and the player will be free to dig through all dirt. Attaining the next level of play will then remain impossible, but the glitch can be resolved by forcing a rock to drop.
 
Level numbers are represented by flowers in the top right of the screen and each new level is noted at the beginning of each stage on the bottom right (as seen in this article's screenshot graphic). In successive levels more monsters appear on each screen and they move quicker. A level is completed successfully when the last monster is dispatched or succeeds in fleeing.
 
In the coin-operated version the game ends on round 256 (round 0), since this board is essentially an unplayable kill screen. At the start of the level a Pooka is placed directly on top of where the player starts, with no way to kill it.

Although Namco has officially given the character of the original Dig Dug the name Dig Dug, in other games where he makes an appearance, the protagonist goes by the name Taizo Hori (in Japanese order, HORI Taizo), and is the father of Susumu Hori, the main character in the Mr. Driller series. He is also the ex-husband of Toby "Kissy" Masuyo, the heroine of Baraduke. His name is a pun on the Japanese phrase "Horitai zo" or "I want to dig!"  a similar pun might be rendered in English as "Will Dig" or "Wanda [Wanna] Dig". Many American gamers learned of his real name via the Nintendo DS game Mr. Driller Drill Spirits, where he is also a playable character. He is additionally featured in an unlockable gallery of Mr. Driller items in Mr. Driller 2. In the Mr. Driller series, Hori is known as the "Hero of the Dig Dug Incident". In Japan, he is also the Hero of the South Island incident and is the honorary chairman of the Driller Council to whom most of the characters answer. This contrasts greatly with the PC remake Dig Dug Deeper, where the hero is simply named Dig Dug.

Pak's Thoughts: Of all the '80s arcade games to come out in the '80s, Dig Dug had the most unique form of defense. While other game heroes were hiding behind guns and power-ups, Dig Dug was inflating his enemies 'til they popped. It was satisfying 30 years ago, and it's satisfying today. I also found it completely liberating to play a game where you weren't bound by any kind of maze walls. Dig Dug could just dig his way in any direction he wanted at any time and shape his own maze. Dig Dug has aged very well and it's still a blast any time I decide to play it.


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#19 – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (Arcade)

(73 Points) 4 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - 2 #1s - ColeStratton, TeamRAD

Turtle Power!

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Release Date:  1989

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, released as Teenage Mutant Hero Turtles in Europe, is a side-scrolling beat-'em-up released by Konami as a coin-operated video game in 1989. It is based on the first Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles animated series which began airing in the winter of 1987. The original coin-operated game was distributed to the arcades in two variants: a standard 2-player version that allowed either player to choose their character and a deluxe 4-player version with each player controlling a different character. Home versions of the game were released for various platforms.

The player chooses from one of the four Ninja Turtles: Leonardo, Michelangelo, Donatello, and Raphael. After Shredder kidnaps the turtles' friend April O'Neil and their mentor Splinter, they must give chase, save their comrades, and defeat the evil Shredder. Up to four players (two in some versions) can take control of any of the turtles. Donatello has slower attacks but a longer range, Michelangelo and Raphael have fast attacks but a short range, and Leonardo is a well-rounded Turtle with average range and speed.
 
The eight-way joystick controls the movements of the Turtle, the jump button makes them jump and the attack button makes them hit in front of them using their weapon. In addition to this, some combinations are possible. The Turtles can throw Foot soldiers overhead, and by pressing the jump and attack buttons, a special attack is performed. Raphael rolls along the ground and finishes with a kick, while the other Turtles do a sweeping jump attack with their weapons. Turtles can also spring off the wall in certain areas. Enemies can be defeated more quickly by slamming them into walls or solid objects. Many objects such as traffic cones, parking meters, fire hydrants and exploding oil drums can be hit or damaged with attacks in order to help defeat nearby enemies. In the attract mode, the game showed the first part of the cartoon opening, along with a portion of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles theme song.
 
The majority of the enemies the Turtles must face are the Foot Soldiers. They wear a different colored uniform depending on what weapon they have. The purple-clad Foot Soldiers also have the ability to hold the Turtles from behind, draining their health and leaving them open to attack by the other Foot soldiers. The bosses in the game includes Bebop and Rocksteady (individually and together), Baxter Stockman, Lieutenant Granitor, General Traag, Krang, and Shredder himself.

Pak's Thoughts: I wasn't initially on-board with Turtlemania. Something about the concept seemed like it was trying too hard. Then one day, me and my friend decided to check out the game at the local arcade. We were hooked on the game, and that got me hooked on the Turtles. What an arcade game it was, too! It had voice acting, partially interactive environments and character selection. My go-to character was Donatello...


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#18 – Missile Command

(75 Points) 5 of 18 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 - sarcasm made Easy


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Release Date:  1980

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Missile Command is a 1980 arcade game by Atari, Inc. that was also licensed to Sega for European release. It is considered one of the most notable games from the Golden Age of Video Arcade Games. The plot of Missile Command is simple: the player's six cities are being attacked by an endless hail of ballistic missiles, some of them even splitting like multiple independently targetable reentry vehicles (MIRVs), and in later levels smart bombs which can evade a less than perfectly targeted missile. As a regional commander of three anti-missile batteries, the player must defend six cities in their zone from being destroyed.

The game is played by moving a crosshair across the sky background via a trackball and pressing one of three buttons to launch a counter-missile from the appropriate battery. Counter-missiles explode upon reaching the crosshair, leaving a fireball that persists for several seconds and destroys any enemy missiles that enter it. There are three batteries, each with ten missiles; a missile battery becomes useless when all its missiles are fired, or if the battery is destroyed by enemy fire. The missiles of the central battery fly to their targets at much greater speed; only these missiles can effectively kill a smart bomb at a distance.
 
The game is staged as a series of levels of increasing difficulty; each level contains a set number of incoming enemy weapons. The weapons attack the six cities, as well as the missile batteries; being struck by an enemy weapon results in destruction of the city or missile battery. Enemy weapons are only able to destroy 3 cities during one level. A level ends if all the cities are destroyed, or when all enemy weaponry is destroyed or reaches its target. A player who runs out of missiles no longer has control over the remainder of the level. At the conclusion of a level, the player receives bonus points for any remaining cities or unused missiles. Between levels missile batteries are rebuilt and replenished; destroyed cities are rebuilt only at set point levels (usually 10 or 12K).
 
The game inevitably ends when all six cities have been wiped out. Like most early arcade games, there is no way to "win" the game; the game just keeps going with ever faster and more prolific incoming missiles. The game, then, is just a contest in seeing how long the player can survive. On conclusion of the game, the screen displays "The End", perhaps a poke at oncoming Nuclear Holocaust rather than the standard "Game Over" text (however, if the player is able to make the high score list, the game then prompts the player to enter his/her initials, with the "The End" sequence skipped).
 
The game features an interesting bug: once a score of 810,000 is reached, a large number of cities are awarded (150 cities plus the continuing accrual of bonus cities) and it is possible to carry on playing for several hours. At some later stage the speed of missiles increases greatly for a few screens. On the 255th and 256th yellow screens, known as the 0x stages, the scoring increases by 256 times the base value. For good players these two 0x stages could earn over a million points, this enabled them to reach a score of approximately 2,800,000 (although only 6 digit scores were shown, so it would display 800,000) and at this point the accelerated rate would suddenly cease and the game would restart at its original (slow) speed and return to the first stage, but with the score and any saved cities retained. In this way it was possible to play this game for hours on end. The world marathon record, set in 1982 by Victor Ali, is 80,364,995 points.

When the game was originally designed, the six cities were meant to represent six cities in California: Eureka, San Francisco, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, and San Diego.
 
While programming Missile Command, the programmer, Dave Theurer, suffered from nightmares of these cities being destroyed by a nuclear blast.

Pak's Thoughts: I never got hooked on Missile Command. It was a bit too abstract for me when I was a kid. I couldn't figure out what was what or why. These days I get it, but I don't have the nostalgia a lot of people have for it. It's a good game, though, and one of the first games that comes to mind when you think of old arcade games.