Author Topic: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons  (Read 46549 times)

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Invader_quirk

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Re: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons
« Reply #105 on: May 05, 2011, 02:10:55 PM »
Replicators, which can make literally anything out of anything...and they're #12? Wow.

Okay, the function is useful, but the device itself is... a hole in the wall. It's boring.


Offline Kete

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Re: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons
« Reply #106 on: May 05, 2011, 03:15:41 PM »
So Hal Jordan's weapon/tool is really not much more than a Fing-Longer.

If I had made a list, I would have included the boxing glove arrow.  I don't know why, but it always makes me laugh.


Offline Compound

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Re: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons
« Reply #107 on: May 05, 2011, 03:30:33 PM »
So Hal Jordan's weapon/tool is really not much more than a Fing-Longer.


Well, no.

Yes, he uses it to make green boxing gloves with it, but he also uses it to fly, survive in space, shrug off immense amounts of damage, communicate with other ring wearers across vast interstellar distances and more. Something that allows a person to move at faster than light speeds and live through an h-bomb explosion is a tad more useful than a really long finger.


Offline goflyblind

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Re: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons
« Reply #108 on: May 05, 2011, 05:06:54 PM »
can it make more replicators?
dF = 0
d*F = J


Offline Compound

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Re: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons
« Reply #109 on: May 05, 2011, 05:31:03 PM »
Replicators, which can make literally anything out of anything...and they're #12? Wow.

Okay, the function is useful, but the device itself is... a hole in the wall. It's boring.

But it can make anything else on the list. ANYTHING.

(Trekkie mode on) Well, not quite. Federation replicators couldn't make living things, although alien ones could. So, a box of kittens? No. A box of BBQ-ed kittens with chipolte sauce? Sure! They also can't manufacture certain unreproducible items like latinum or presumably certain rare elements like dilitihum. And there are limits to its usage as well. Voyager had as a reoccurring plot element the idea that replicator usage needed to be rationed, which is why Neelix was working as a cook on the ship. Of course, it being Voyager, it was done in the usual half-assed manner, so you can't really tell why it needed to be rationed.

Plus, there are certain items that the replicator just can't handle. It can't do an AI. You could have a replicator make a physical replica of Data (or Dis) but it wouldn't have the spark of life in it. That just wasn't available in the Federation. Same thing with the cyberspace only stuff ala Reboot. And magical items? There's no magic in the Trek universe, so while you could make a wand or a replica of Thor's hammer, it wouldn't do anything beyond what a normal hammer or piece of wood would do. And items that are even higher tech than what the Federation uses (power rings, stuff that The Culture or Xeelee use, etc.) presumably couldn't be made without figuring out how they worked in the first place. (It'd be like making a flashlight without knowing how to make batteries.) So, while incredibly useful, it isn't all-powerful (Trekkie mode off)


Offline Compound

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Re: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons
« Reply #110 on: May 05, 2011, 06:37:15 PM »
Well, sure. "Hmm. Bill time. Better replicate another krugerrand" would be more generally useful than making a 40 ft. tall green energy doomsday robot, especially since the ring comes with the whole "Risk your life. Don't accept payment for it" obligations as well.


Offline Tyrant

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Re: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons
« Reply #111 on: May 05, 2011, 08:18:31 PM »
#10
Gravity Gun (Zero Point energy Field Manipulator)- Half Life 2
(62 points) 3 of 12 lists - Highest Ranking - #2 Asbestos Bill



The Zero Point Energy Field Manipulator, most commonly known as the Gravity Gun, is a tractor beam-type weapon that was originally designed for handling hazardous materials, but, as Alyx stated, was primarily used for heavy lifting. At its core is a substance that appears to be a Xen crystal. Introduced to the player by Alyx Vance shortly after arrival at Black Mesa East, the Gravity Gun soon becomes an invaluable tool in Gordon's arsenal and is considered one of his trademark weapons.

The gravity gun has two basic modes. The primary fire releases an energy blast which punts the targeted object with tremendous force. This is useful for clearing out barriers and moving heavy objects. The secondary fire picks objects up and holds them just ahead of the gun. These objects can then either be dropped by pressing the secondary fire button a second time or punted with the primary fire. The secondary fire can only pick up lighter objects, mainly those which Gordon himself could carry, but the primary fire is capable of punting much larger objects even if the secondary fire cannot effect them. The gun cannot affect most organic material, though there are a few exceptions.

The combination of the gravity gun's secondary and primary fire modes allow it to be used as a powerful weapon. Since it uses physics objects rather than conventional ammunition, there is virtually no limit to how many times it can be fired; however, this advantage is balanced by the need to "reload" after every shot by grabbing a new object. Depending on the object fired, the gravity gun is potentially one of the most damaging weapons in the game. Heavier objects like metal barrels and propane tanks can kill even Overwatch soldiers in a single hit, but conversely things like plastic crates and wooden palates will do very little damage due to their lesser mass. Explosive barrels in particular are a highly devastating weapon when combined with the gravity gun, but this has the potential to backfire if the enemy shoots them while they are being held. The gravity gun is most effectively used as a short to mid-range weapon, since the physics objects it uses for ammunition are affected by gravity.

In addition to its use as a weapon, the secondary fire of the gun can be used to pull objects over from a distance, allowing Gordon to access supplies or other objects that would otherwise be out of reach. It can also be used to grab larger objects and hold them up as makeshift shields. Though normally unable to drag heavier objects, it proves capable of doing so in a select few areas, mainly as a way to create bridges. It should be noted that the secondary fire of the gravity gun does not automatically tractor in targeted objects. The object must be brought within a certain distance for the field to capture it, during which time it is still subject to gravity. The gun must also be constantly trained on the object to maintain the effect until it is captured.


Offline Tyrant

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Re: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons
« Reply #112 on: May 05, 2011, 08:25:27 PM »
#9
Samus Aran's Arm Cannon- Metroid
(64 points) 3 of 12 lists - Highest Ranking - #2 Tyrant



Samus Aran's Arm Cannon is her primary weapon, allowing for both energy-based and ballistic attacks. The arm cannon, as its name implies, is affixed to Samus's right forearm. What separates the arm cannon from other firearms is its ability to access various weapons systems by quickly changing its configuration, thus eliminating the need for multiple (and sometimes bulky) guns. For example, during her time on Tallon IV, Samus could switch between four beam systems (not including the final beam), missiles, and four Charge Combos. By default, Samus's Arm Cannon always features the Power Beam.

It is also shown to have many other functions, such as up linking with computers or other systems, welding, physical combat, and directing the Gunship.


Offline Tyrant

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Re: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons
« Reply #113 on: May 05, 2011, 08:29:22 PM »
#8
Tricorders- Star Trek
(76 points) 5 of 12 lists - Highest Ranking - #5 Imrahil



In the fictional Star Trek universe, a tricorder is a multifunction hand held device used for sensor scanning, data analysis, and recording data.

Three primary variants of the tricorder are issued in Star Trek's Starfleet. The standard tricorder is a general-purpose device used primarily to scout unfamiliar areas, make detailed examination of living things, and record and review technical data. The medical tricorder is used by doctors to help diagnose diseases and collect bodily information about a patient; the key difference between this and a standard tricorder is a detachable hand-held high-resolution scanner stored in a compartment of the tricorder when not in use. The engineering tricorder is fine-tuned for starship engineering purposes. There are also many other lesser-used varieties of special use tricorders. The word "tricorder" is a portmanteau of "tri-" and "recorder", referring to the device's three default scanning functions: GEO (geological), MET (meteorological), and BIO (biological).

The tricorder of the 23rd century, as seen in Star Trek: The Original Series, is a black, rectangular device with a top-mounted rotating hood, two opening compartments and a shoulder strap. The top pivots open exposing a small screen and control buttons. The ship's doctor uses a variant of this model with a detachable "medical scanner" stored in the bottom compartment when not in use. The 24th century unit is a small, gray, hand-held model with a flip-out panel to allow for a larger screen. This design was further refined later with a slightly more angular appearance that was seen on most of the Star Trek: The Next Generation-era movies as well as later seasons of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Voyager.

In the post-Next Generation era (Star Trek Nemesis and Star Trek: Elite Force II), a newer tricorder was introduced. It is flatter, with a small flap that opens on top and a large touchscreen interface.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2011, 08:30:58 PM by Tyrant »


Offline Tyrant

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Re: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons
« Reply #114 on: May 05, 2011, 08:36:23 PM »
#7
The Hitchhiker's Guide- Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
(80 points) 5 of 12 lists - Highest Ranking - #4 lassieface


The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is a fictional electronic guide book in the multimedia scifi/comedy series of the same name by Douglas Adams. The Guide serves as "the standard repository for all knowledge and wisdom" for many members of the series' galaxy-spanning civilization. Entries from the guidebook are used as comic narration to bridge events and provide background information in every version of the story. The guide is published by "Megadodo Publications", a publishing company on Ursa Minor Beta.

The Guide's numerous entries are quoted throughout the various incarnations of the Hitchhiker's Guide series. As well as offering background information, the Guide's entries often employ irony, sarcasm and subtle commentary on the action and on life in general. For instance, the entry on the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation describes their marketing division as "a bunch of mindless jerks who will be the first against the wall when the revolution comes", with a footnote to the effect that the editors would welcome applications from anyone interested in taking over the post of robotics correspondent. The entry on the villainous Vogons begins, "Here's what to do if you want to get a lift from a Vogon: forget it." The entry on "What to do if you find yourself stuck in a crack in the ground underneath a giant boulder you can't move, with no hope of rescue" suggests that first, you "consider how lucky you are that life has been good to you so far. Alternatively, if life hasn't been good to you so far, which given your current circumstances seems more likely, consider how lucky you are that it won't be troubling you much longer." Its advice on drunkenness is simply, "Go to it, and good luck", and according to the 2005 film, its entry on love is "Avoid it at all costs".

Despite the work of dedicated field researchers such as Ford Prefect, much of the contributions to the Guide are made on a strictly ad-hoc basis. With the permanent staff more likely to be on a lunch break than working, "most of the actual work got done by any passing stranger who happened to wander into the empty offices of an afternoon and saw something worth doing." This has led to the Guide being patchy in its coverage, cobbled together (for example: the entry on "The Universe" was copied from the back of a packet of breakfast cereal) and often riddled with errors.

The Guide tends to focus on certain topics. For instance, if looking for information about sex, the Guide suggests reading "chapters seven, nine, ten, eleven, fourteen, sixteen, seventeen, nineteen, twenty-one to eighty-four inclusive, and in fact most of the rest of the Guide." On the Guide's outdated and typo-filled entries (some of which could cause serious injury or death, such as "Ravenous Bugblatter Beasts often make a very good meal for visiting tourists," rather than "Ravenous bugblatter beasts often make a very good meal of visiting tourists."



Offline Tyrant

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Re: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons
« Reply #115 on: May 05, 2011, 08:42:08 PM »
#6
The Babel Fish- Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
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The Babel fish is small, yellow, leech-like, and probably the oddest thing in the universe. It feeds on brain wave energy, absorbing all unconscious frequencies and then excreting telepathically a matrix formed from the conscious frequencies and nerve signals picked up from the speech centres of the brain, the practical upshot of which is that if you stick one in your ear, you can instantly understand anything said to you in any form of language: the speech you hear decodes the brain wave matrix. It is a universal translator which simultaneously translates from one spoken language to another. It takes the brainwaves of the other body and what they are thinking then transmits the thoughts to the speech centres of the host's brain, the speech heard by the ear decodes the brainwave matrix. When inserted into the ear, its nutrition processes convert unconscious sound waves into conscious brain waves, neatly crossing the language divide between any species.

The book points out that the Babel fish could not possibly have developed naturally, and therefore both proves and disproves the existence of God: Now it is such a bizarrely improbable coincidence that anything so mindbogglingly useful could evolve purely by chance that some thinkers have chosen to see it as a final and clinching proof of the non-existence of God. The argument goes something like this: "I refuse to prove that I exist," says God, "for proof denies faith, and without faith I am nothing". "But," says man, "the Babel fish is a dead giveaway, isn't it? It proves you exist and so therefore you don't. QED." "Oh dear," says God, "I hadn't thought of that," and promptly vanishes in a puff of logic. "Oh, that was easy," says man, and for an encore goes on to prove that black is white, and gets killed on the next zebra crossing. Most leading theologians claim that this argument is a load of dingo's kidneys. But this did not stop Oolon Colluphid making a small fortune when he used it as the central theme for his best selling book, Well That About Wraps It Up for God. Meanwhile the poor Babel fish, by effectively removing all barriers to communication between different cultures and races, has caused more and bloodier wars than anything else in the history of creation.

Arthur Dent commented only 'Eurgh!' when first inserting the fish into his ear. It enabled him to understand Vogon Poetry - not necessarily a good thing.


Offline Tyrant

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Re: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons
« Reply #116 on: May 05, 2011, 08:50:20 PM »
Bonus Entry: Silly Looking/Sounding Weapons/Tools
The Joker's Flower Lapels


It may spit acid and/or God knows what else, but at the end of the day, it's still a damn flower.

Tomorrow: Top 5 weapons and tools!


Watchman

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Re: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons
« Reply #117 on: May 05, 2011, 09:14:28 PM »
Replicators, which can make literally anything out of anything...and they're #12? Wow.

Okay, the function is useful, but the device itself is... a hole in the wall. It's boring.

But it can make anything else on the list. ANYTHING.

Can it make another Osama Bin Laden?


Offline Compound

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Re: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons
« Reply #118 on: May 05, 2011, 10:23:15 PM »
#6
The Babel Fish- Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
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Meh. Movie Babel fish. Real one:


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC #47: Fictional Tools & Weapons
« Reply #119 on: May 06, 2011, 05:19:22 AM »
#8
Tricorders- Star Trek
(76 points) 5 of 12 lists - Highest Ranking - #5 Imrahil




This one almost made it on my list but was pushed off by Leela's wrist thing from Futurama.

#7
The Hitchhiker's Guide- Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
(80 points) 5 of 12 lists - Highest Ranking - #4 lassieface

Sure, the letters are big, but are they friendly?  I always thought Don't Panic had a different font.

I always thought the letters would look rounded and very 70's/80's, sort of like the Doctor Who logo they used for the mid 80's seasons.  I feel that the letters should be so friendly, that if you are incurably panicked, then it should feel like you are being mocked just by looking at it.

#6
The Babel Fish- Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
(83 points) 3 of 12 lists - Highest Ranking - #1 Compound



As an ESL teacher, I would really want this.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2011, 06:14:49 AM by Johnny Unusual »