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Author Topic: Cloverfield  (Read 30959 times)

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GLaDOS

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Cloverfield
« on: April 16, 2008, 09:29:16 PM »
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Offline RobtheBarbarian

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Re: Cloverfield
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2008, 09:31:44 PM »
My main worry is that the gimmick inherent with the entire identity of the movie might make it hard to riff.


Janitor

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Re: Cloverfield
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2008, 09:37:42 PM »
Spoiler (click to show/hide)


Well I was reading the 20 questions thread and I know one gentleman that isn't going to purchase it. He's a good sport, it's not that he thinks that the riff shouldn't be made, but he's not interested. I was compelled by the premise, but I have yet to see the film. I guess I will at it's DVD release.


GLaDOS

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Re: Cloverfield
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2008, 09:38:01 PM »
My main worry is that the gimmick inherent with the entire identity of the movie might make it hard to riff.
In Mike, Bill and Kevin I trust.


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Re: Cloverfield
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2008, 09:53:02 PM »
My main worry is that the gimmick inherent with the entire identity of the movie might make it hard to riff.
In Mike, Bill and Kevin I trust.

Well what do you know? You keep flooding the center with a deadly neurotoxin. Just stop it OK?


GLaDOS

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Re: Cloverfield
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2008, 09:58:23 PM »
Well what do you know? You keep flooding the center with a deadly neurotoxin. Just stop it OK?
Despite your best efforts, the only thing you've managed to break so far is my heart.  :'(


Janitor

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Re: Cloverfield
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2008, 10:00:54 PM »
Well what do you know? You keep flooding the center with a deadly neurotoxin. Just stop it OK?
Despite your best efforts, the only thing you've managed to break so far is my heart.  :'(

And I suppose that as of now, there will be a lot less converation...


Offline GalvaTRION

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Re: Cloverfield
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2008, 10:02:56 PM »
If Cloverfield were a woman, I would marry it, grovel at it's feet, satisfy it's every need, and have our sex organs switched out so she wouldn't have to feel the pain of child birth for the fifty babies we'd make together. If anyone touched her, or looked at her, I'd beat their faces into the floor with a burlap sack filled with ten penny nails, and throw his body into a well.
 
We'd be so happy together.


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Re: Cloverfield
« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2008, 10:03:57 PM »
If Cloverfield were a woman, I would marry it, grovel at it's feet, satisfy it's every need, and have our sex organs switched out so she wouldn't have to feel the pain of child birth for the fifty babies we'd make together. If anyone touched her, or looked at her, I'd beat their faces into the floor with a burlap sack filled with ten penny nails, and throw his body into a well.
 
We'd be so happy together.

So it was pretty good then?


GLaDOS

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Re: Cloverfield
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2008, 10:11:03 PM »
If Cloverfield were a woman, I would marry it, grovel at it's feet, satisfy it's every need, and have our sex organs switched out so she wouldn't have to feel the pain of child birth for the fifty babies we'd make together. If anyone touched her, or looked at her, I'd beat their faces into the floor with a burlap sack filled with ten penny nails, and throw his body into a well.
We'd be so happy together.
Always the young generation buying into the hype. I don't blame you. It's only natural that you would want to marry a movie and swap genitalia. Such love for a movie, any movie is completely natural.


Offline Gaseous Snake

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Re: Cloverfield
« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2008, 10:40:59 PM »
I was one of those wusses who couldn't stomach the movie because of its jerking around and blurring. Though I hear that its stomach turning properties aren't as bad on the small screen.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2008, 10:42:48 PM by Homunculus »


GLaDOS

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Re: Cloverfield
« Reply #11 on: April 16, 2008, 10:43:49 PM »
I was one of those wusses who couldn't stomach the movie. Though I hear that its stomach turning properties aren't as bad on the small screen.
I understand how someone could get motion sickness from watching the movie. I just think that it really says something about a movie when it induces nausea in the masses.


Offline GalvaTRION

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Re: Cloverfield
« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2008, 10:48:44 PM »
If Cloverfield were a woman, I would marry it, grovel at it's feet, satisfy it's every need, and have our sex organs switched out so she wouldn't have to feel the pain of child birth for the fifty babies we'd make together. If anyone touched her, or looked at her, I'd beat their faces into the floor with a burlap sack filled with ten penny nails, and throw his body into a well.
We'd be so happy together.
Always the young generation buying into the hype. I don't blame you. It's only natural that you would want to marry a movie and swap genitalia. Such love for a movie, any movie is completely natural.

Wrong, sir. Wrong. The only exposure I had to the film pre-seeing the thing was the trailer before Transformers. I don't bother with the bullshit games movies play these days to keep people interested. I've seen the movie 5 times in the theater- twice on opening day- so I could see it on the big screen as many times as possible since the chance to see a Japanese style dai kaiju film on the big screen has only happened to me once (Godzilla 2000- not a good movie, but marginally more magnificent on the big screen).

I'm a kaiju fan. Hard core. I love the movie because it was exactly what the giant monster genre needed. It was exactly what GINO (Godzilla 1998), Godzilla 2000, and Godzilla: Final Wars failed to accomplish, which is pulling out of the same-old-same-old stories while remaining faithful to the genre and it's roots. Spiritually, it's more an American Godzilla movie than what Emmrich and Devlin came up with (to wit: Making a 50s American style monster movie and slapping the name "Godzilla" on it). I respect the hell out of it for the simple fact that they didn't kill the monster- which is one of the major things that separates American style monster movies from Japanese ("America's awesome military or super science TRIUMPHS," versus merely surviving or hopefully having monsters destroy eachother).

Gojira was born from the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki- not in the literal sense of atomic bombings awakening a monster, but in the sense that the destruction caused left a mark on the Japanese, which worked it's way into their pop art. Just as in that case, 9/11 was used as the "BIG HORRIFYING EVENT" this drew from. The parasites that dropped off of the monster in Cloverfield seem to me an homage to Gojira Returns/Return of Godzilla/Godzilla 1985.

The smartest thing this film did was strip everything down to it's essentials. Explaining the monster is a big expository pain, and it serves to only lessen the suspension of disbelief- leaving it a mystery, and the first person perspective kept the movie feeling like a nightmare. It avoided the trap that keeps most monster flicks relegated to the hard core audience who either likes GIANT MONSTERS enough not to care about the rest of the movie, or find the attempts at sciencey-sounding words kitschy and fun on an ironic level.

I'm the first person to hate the hell out of SHAKEY CAM- as far as I'm concerned 9 times out of 10 it's a dodge for being unable to properly choreograph a fight scene. Cloverfield is the 10th time, the instance where it was utilized correctly. The shakeyness was disorienting, but to compensate they used excellent composition to keep the scenes interesting, and dare I say beautiful at times. The 4th time I saw it in theaters, I focused mostly on that aspect, and was amazed at the effective imagery.

I'm tired and ranting right now. I'll probably rant more about my sloppy love of this movie tomorrow, but I'll leave it at this: If I were some simpleton sucked into a hype machine, I'd own the Pirates of the Carribean series (crappy pander-fests), have a Barack Obama sticker on a hybrid (refuse to own either), and be sitting here, typing this message while listening to... I dunno. What do kids listen to these days? Rap music?
« Last Edit: April 16, 2008, 11:07:18 PM by GalvaTRION »


GLaDOS

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Re: Cloverfield
« Reply #13 on: April 16, 2008, 11:15:54 PM »
If Cloverfield were a woman, I would marry it, grovel at it's feet, satisfy it's every need, and have our sex organs switched out so she wouldn't have to feel the pain of child birth for the fifty babies we'd make together. If anyone touched her, or looked at her, I'd beat their faces into the floor with a burlap sack filled with ten penny nails, and throw his body into a well.
We'd be so happy together.
Always the young generation buying into the hype. I don't blame you. It's only natural that you would want to marry a movie and swap genitalia. Such love for a movie, any movie is completely natural.

Wrong, sir. Wrong. The only exposure I had to the film pre-seeing the thing was the trailer before Transformers. I don't bother with the bullshit games movies play these days to keep people interested. I've seen the movie 5 times in the theater- twice on opening day- so I could see it on the big screen as many times as possible since the chance to see a Japanese style dai kaiju film on the big screen has only happened to me once (Godzilla 2000- not a good movie, but marginally more magnificent on the big screen).

I'm a kaiju fan. Hard core. I love the movie because it was exactly what the giant monster genre needed. It was exactly what GINO (Godzilla 1998), Godzilla 2000, and Godzilla: Final Wars failed to accomplish, which is pulling out of the same-old-same-old stories while remaining faithful to the genre and it's roots. Spiritually, it's more an American Godzilla movie than what Emmrich and Devlin came up with (to wit: Making a 50s American style monster movie and slapping the name "Godzilla" on it). I respect the hell out of it for the simple fact that they didn't kill the monster- which is one of the major things that separates American style monster movies from Japanese ("America's awesome military or super science TRIUMPHS," versus merely surviving or hopefully having monsters destroy eachother).
Gojira was born from the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki- not in the literal sense of atomic bombings awakening a monster, but in the sense that the destruction caused left a mark on the Japanese, which worked it's way into their pop art. Just as in that case, 9/11 was used as the "BIG HORRIFYING EVENT" this drew from. The parasites that dropped off of the monster in Cloverfield seem to me an homage to Gojira Returns/Return of Godzilla/Godzilla 1985.
The smartest thing this film did was strip everything down to it's essentials. Explaining the monster is a big expository pain, and it serves to only lessen the suspension of disbelief- leaving it a mystery, and the first person perspective kept the movie feeling like a nightmare. It avoided the trap that keeps most monster flicks relegated to the hard core audience who either likes GIANT MONSTERS enough not to care about the rest of the movie, or find the attempts at sciencey-sounding words kitschy and fun on an ironic level.
I'm the first person to hate the hell out of SHAKEY CAM- as far as I'm concerned 9 times out of 10 it's a dodge for being unable to properly choreograph a fight scene. Cloverfield is the 10th time, the instance where it was utilized correctly. The shakeyness was disorienting, but to compensate they used excellent composition to keep the scenes interesting, and dare I say beautiful at times. The 4th time I saw it in theaters, I focused mostly on that aspect, and was amazed at the effective imagery.
I'm tired and ranting right now. I'll probably rant more about my sloppy love of this movie tomorrow, but I'll leave it at this: If I were some simpleton sucked into a hype machine, I'd own the Pirates of the Carribean series (crappy pander-fests), have a Barack Obama sticker on a hybrid (refuse to own either), and be sitting here, typing this message while listening to... I dunno. What do kids listen to these days? Rap music?
With all due respect, I think you're over-complicating it. It's really nothing more than just another monster movie. It only happens to be set apart because the POV is different, but that's all there is to it.


Offline Gaseous Snake

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Re: Cloverfield
« Reply #14 on: April 16, 2008, 11:39:07 PM »
If Cloverfield were a woman, I would marry it, grovel at it's feet, satisfy it's every need, and have our sex organs switched out so she wouldn't have to feel the pain of child birth for the fifty babies we'd make together. If anyone touched her, or looked at her, I'd beat their faces into the floor with a burlap sack filled with ten penny nails, and throw his body into a well.
We'd be so happy together.
Always the young generation buying into the hype. I don't blame you. It's only natural that you would want to marry a movie and swap genitalia. Such love for a movie, any movie is completely natural.

Wrong, sir. Wrong. The only exposure I had to the film pre-seeing the thing was the trailer before Transformers. I don't bother with the bullshit games movies play these days to keep people interested. I've seen the movie 5 times in the theater- twice on opening day- so I could see it on the big screen as many times as possible since the chance to see a Japanese style dai kaiju film on the big screen has only happened to me once (Godzilla 2000- not a good movie, but marginally more magnificent on the big screen).

I'm a kaiju fan. Hard core. I love the movie because it was exactly what the giant monster genre needed. It was exactly what GINO (Godzilla 1998), Godzilla 2000, and Godzilla: Final Wars failed to accomplish, which is pulling out of the same-old-same-old stories while remaining faithful to the genre and it's roots. Spiritually, it's more an American Godzilla movie than what Emmrich and Devlin came up with (to wit: Making a 50s American style monster movie and slapping the name "Godzilla" on it). I respect the hell out of it for the simple fact that they didn't kill the monster- which is one of the major things that separates American style monster movies from Japanese ("America's awesome military or super science TRIUMPHS," versus merely surviving or hopefully having monsters destroy eachother).

Gojira was born from the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki- not in the literal sense of atomic bombings awakening a monster, but in the sense that the destruction caused left a mark on the Japanese, which worked it's way into their pop art. Just as in that case, 9/11 was used as the "BIG HORRIFYING EVENT" this drew from. The parasites that dropped off of the monster in Cloverfield seem to me an homage to Gojira Returns/Return of Godzilla/Godzilla 1985.

The smartest thing this film did was strip everything down to it's essentials. Explaining the monster is a big expository pain, and it serves to only lessen the suspension of disbelief- leaving it a mystery, and the first person perspective kept the movie feeling like a nightmare. It avoided the trap that keeps most monster flicks relegated to the hard core audience who either likes GIANT MONSTERS enough not to care about the rest of the movie, or find the attempts at sciencey-sounding words kitschy and fun on an ironic level.

I'm the first person to hate the hell out of SHAKEY CAM- as far as I'm concerned 9 times out of 10 it's a dodge for being unable to properly choreograph a fight scene. Cloverfield is the 10th time, the instance where it was utilized correctly. The shakeyness was disorienting, but to compensate they used excellent composition to keep the scenes interesting, and dare I say beautiful at times. The 4th time I saw it in theaters, I focused mostly on that aspect, and was amazed at the effective imagery.

I'm tired and ranting right now. I'll probably rant more about my sloppy love of this movie tomorrow, but I'll leave it at this: If I were some simpleton sucked into a hype machine, I'd own the Pirates of the Carribean series (crappy pander-fests), have a Barack Obama sticker on a hybrid (refuse to own either), and be sitting here, typing this message while listening to... I dunno. What do kids listen to these days? Rap music?

That's a whole lotta words that I'm not going to read.