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Author Topic: OZ series: Why did the Wizard hide Ozma?  (Read 3701 times)

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Offline deadheadpunk

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Re: OZ series: Why did the Wizard hide Ozma?
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2007, 08:49:37 AM »
14 by Baum, 19 by Ruth Plumly Thompson and then a bunch of others of varing cannonical status.

But the 33 combined are the core books really.

 :o that's a lot of books!


Offline Tripe

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Re: OZ series: Why did the Wizard hide Ozma?
« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2007, 10:29:08 AM »
I mean if you like you can just go with the first 14.

In any order really except start with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz after that you could pick them out of a hat.


Offline deadheadpunk

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Re: OZ series: Why did the Wizard hide Ozma?
« Reply #17 on: December 20, 2007, 11:35:09 AM »
oh i'm not 'scared' by the amount just didn't know there were that many  :)

thanks for the info!  :D


Offline bratpop

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Re: OZ series: Why did the Wizard hide Ozma?
« Reply #18 on: January 17, 2008, 12:50:51 AM »
I call BS on the whole Ozma thing anyway since it is stated that when Queen Lurline flew over Oz and enchanted it to make it a fairyland, everyone stopped aging. So all babies would have stayed the same. And since I assume that was ages before the Wizard ever arrived, how could Ozma even be born, let alone get old enough to run away from Mombi? And then even grow older than Dorothy and dye her hair? SHENANIGANS!


Offline Jazzman99

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Re: OZ series: Why did the Wizard hide Ozma?
« Reply #19 on: January 25, 2008, 10:19:39 AM »
Yeah, Baum had a pretty freewheeling approach to continuity.  He regularly came up with entirely new plot dimensions or explanations, changed characters around, etc.  The history of Oz prior to the Wizard's arrival is particularly tangled, with several different versions being given at different times.

That said, I think all 14 of the Baum books are worth reading, and all have at least a couple of laugh out loud moments or memorable characters.  The first seven, however, are undoubtedly the best, and I'd recommend them to anyone.  Other than the essential first book, the best are #6, The Emerald City of Oz, in which Dorothy moves to Oz permanently (having her end up there "accidentally" in every book was getting a bit old) just as the evil Nome King launches a fearsome attack, and #7, The Patchwork Girl of Oz, which introduces some of the best characters and has a genuinely involving adventure.

Post-Baum, the Thompson books are fun, but the best Oz work for my money was done by Eric Shanower, who put out five Oz graphic novels in the 80s.  They've recently been republished as a single volume (http://www.amazon.com/Adventures-Oz-Eric-Shanower/dp/1933239611/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1201284966&sr=8-2), and it's really worth picking up.  Shanower's art is beautiful, detailed and expressive, and his writing is true to Baum while still adding new levels of emotional realism and maturity.
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