2

Author Topic: What was the last movie you watched?  (Read 1407909 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Retro Muppet Pastor

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 813
  • Liked: 144
  • Now available in minty fresh flavor.
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18150 on: July 28, 2018, 02:15:37 AM »
Mission Impossible: Fallout This movie was really really good! It had a lot of tense moments, great action, some very fun twists, and I came away from the movie feeling very satisfied with this, the sixth entry in the MI franchise. I'm not sure I would say the series is getting better and better with each installment, but I would say that they are keeping the series of the highest quality. However I will go so far as to say that unless something dreadfully bad happens, this series is as it stands now is the gold standard for smart and compelling action drama film-making.

I saw a review of that movie, and it kind of concerns me.  Seems dangerous.


<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/S54pGjRnbHk?rel=0" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/S54pGjRnbHk?rel=0</a>
I'm not particularly religious, and I don't really like Muppets, but I do love word play.


Offline stethacantus

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 578
  • Liked: 39
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18151 on: July 29, 2018, 05:20:39 PM »
House of Traps ( 1981 )
Of all the film's directed by Chang Cheh, I prefer his output in the early 70s, most of which involved street gangs. In the mid 70s he turned to films about the Shaolin Temple, followed by his late 70s - early 80s period with the Venom Mob. This name given to the group of stock actors who appeared in most of his later Shaw Brothers films, notably his most famous work Five Deadly Venoms ( 1978 ). The Venom Mob era is his most popular among martial arts enthusiests, especially in the African American community, and have been the hottest selling of the Shaw Brothers bootlegs. But this era has never been my favorite. Here his films are too bogged down with confusing plots, where dozens of main characters are introduced, each having their own individual story to keep track of, and usually having the audience guessing which ones are secretly good guys or on the side of the villains. Five Deadly Venoms became an instant cult classic due to it's opening premise. A dying martial arts master reveals to his final student that he had five previous students, each who hid his identity from him with a mask, and some who are most likely using their abilities to commit crimes. The master's dying request to his student, that he find the five deadly Venoms, determine which ones are good and which ones turned evil, and exterminate the evil ones by teaming up with any existing good ones. After that you need a chart to follow the rest of the film.

House of Traps has been the Holy Grail of the Venom Mob films. The only one never to have been released on home video. And with perhaps the greatest premise of all the Shaw Brothers films. The villain has hidden stolen treasures in a booby trapped house where Spike's shoot out of the floors, the stairs turn into razors that chop feet off, and all sorts of sharp things pop out of the walls. Around the late 90s a poor quality bootleg surfaced, but it was not until 2008 that Image released the film on DVD. This was one of the first Shaw Brothers films I purchased when Celestial began restoring them for DVD, but felt disappointed after viewing. This weekend I decided to give it another chance.

The main problem with this film is how underwhelming the house is, which is a two story pagoda with not many traps. Chang Cheh could have designed a much larger nightmare house with multiple rooms similar to The Cube ( 1997 ). But instead most of the screen time is devoted to guessing which characters are secretly villains and which are secretly government agents sent to infiltrate the villain's organization. In all actuality it is the least interesting of the Venom Mob films.
.
Flag of Iron ( a.k.a. Spearman a.k.a. Spearman of Death ) ( 1980 ) 
Thanks to an early morning appointment which turned out to only last a few minutes instead of the anticipated couple of hours, I ended up with enough time in my schedule for two martial arts films. In this Venom Mob film Chang Cheh recycled the plot from The Duel, this time changing the era from 1930s mobsters, to Waring clans of the 1800s. I do prefer The Duel, but this is one of the better Venom Mob films, with an easy to follow plot, and the only guess work happening in the beginning of the second act where you have to guess which characters are really hired assassins sent to kill the hero. And as he dispatches them all within 20 minutes, there is very little to keep track of. The film's title comes from the name of the weapon of choice among the clansmen. A spear that is also a flag pole for a black flag. When waved around, the flag is supposed to distract and confuse the enemy long enough for him to be pierced by the business end.

Abar, The First Black Superman ( a.k.a. In Your Face ) ( 1977 )
Here we go. If I am going to collect every single superhero film released on DVD or Blu-ray then a lot of them are going to be crap. And by crap I mean films that make Batman & Robin look like Citizen Kane. This week is a superhero film you most likely never knew existed. A blaxploitation superhero movie. And I bet you thought Meteor Man ( 1993 ) was the first black superhero film.  Here's where it gets better. This was one of those films a couple of people who had never been in the movie business before decided to make. In this case a pimp who wanted to make a film called Super Black. Done with zero budget, the pimp was not able to pay the lab developing the film, so they foreclosed on it. Two years later the film lab completed the film and released it under it's current title.

Except I am not exactly sure what it's current title is supposed to be. I know it was released in 1990 on video as In Your Face, and the full screen print used for the only DVD release seems to have been sourced from that VHS release. The DVD box calls the film ABAR: Black Superman, but the title on the movie itself is just ABAR.

This is supposed to be a superhero film, but I wouldn't call it that. The story begins with Dr. Kincade and his family moving into their new home. The only problem is Kincade and his family are black, and the rest of the neighborhood are white racists who immediately form an angry mob. The sort of mob you would expect outside of Frankenstein's castle holding pitchforks and torches, only this mob holds racists picket signs and throws trash on the doctor's front lawn. ( Or at least the dirt hill in front of his house where a lawn should be, but the film makers couldn't afford. ) Kincade is played by  J Walter Smith, who looks a lot like Morgan Freeman, has a voice that sounds just like Morgan Freeman, pronounces his words exactly like Morgan Freeman, but just can't act like Morgan Freeman. Around the time this movie was being made, Morgan Freeman was still a cast member on the PBS children's show The Electric Company

Enter Abar ( Tobar Mayo ), a black activist from the ghetto, and a leader of a group called the BFU. He and his group show up at Kincade's house and Chase off the white mob. Kincade talks Abar into being a bodyguard, even though Abar lectures him about abandoning the ghetto after he became successful. This story goes on for an hour with the plot getting anywhere near being a superhero film. Occasionally you see the doctor experimenting on rabbits in his basement laboratory, but that goes nowhere. One of the racists deliberately runs over and kills one of the doctor's children. Having had enough, his wife takes their daughter and moves out of their house. The doctor begins to show signs of a mental breakdown as he now spends his entire day working non stop in his lab. Finally, about an hour and ten minutes into this 99 minute film, the doctor calls Abar into his lab and tells him he has made a formula that turns humans into superhumans, and asks Abar to be the human guinea pig. For another ten minutes Abar refuses to take the formula. And then finally, after being shot at by racists, Abar goes into the lab and drinks the formula. Only Kincade has suddenly decided that Abar is unstable and will turn into a monster. Since the formula will take three hours to work ( what? ) The Doctor hunts for Abar all over town so he can shoot and kill him before he becomes bulletproof.

The doctor never finds him, and by morning he has not only become bulletproof, but he has gained God like powers. So in the final 10 minutes of the film, Abar walks around the ghetto, changing reality with his God like powers. For example, the winos drinking alcohol in an alley are suddenly sober and drinking milk. A group of teenagers shooting craps are suddenly wearing caps and gowns and graduating from college. A purse snatcher uncontrollably runs around the block and gives the purse back from the woman he stole it from. A prostitute who was just slapped by her pimp suddenly beats him up using martial arts. And so on. Abar then goes to the racists white neighborhood and begins filling their homes with rats, snakes and bees, driving them into the streets where he creates a wind that blows them away(?).

Not exactly a superhero film. Okay, so he had something you could call a super power, and used it to stop a couple of criminals. But no costume. Next week's film does have a superhero, although if you blink then you will miss him.


Animal Crackers ( 1930 )
Much funnier than Coconuts. The brothers had a much better screen presence. Once again Zeppo is barely on screen. Instead of being cast as the love interest, he is in a smaller role as Groucho's assistant. He does get to be in a routine where Groucho dictates a letter, but does little more than pretend to write down Groucho's nonsense. Is it ant wonder why no one complained when Zeppo left the act?
« Last Edit: July 29, 2018, 05:33:04 PM by stethacantus »


Offline Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 27029
  • Liked: 5226
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18152 on: July 30, 2018, 08:41:24 AM »


976-EVIL - I thought I would watch this again. Haven't seen it in many many years. Honestly, it's not bad. For the first two thirds of it I quite liked it. The main character Spike is a blend of generic tough guy, with a tolerating affection for his weird cousin, and he treats his girlfriend like a dick sometimes. But because of all that he feels more like a real person than just the one note type of character we usually get in horror movies. It's also unusual that the love interest girl dies so early in the movie. Unfortunately though it means there's another woman that we barely get to meet that is the damsel in distress at the end. It would have been just as well to omit the second woman entirely. She is the love interest (I think) of another character we barely get to know, the private investigator. He really serves no purpose except to investigate the 976-EVIL phone line a little, which is pointless since it ends up being mostly vague and mysterious anyway (and with a premise like this it's best left that way).
  The other flaws in this movie are the cardboard cutout bullies, and the excruciatingly awful religious Aunt. The Aunt in particular feels like she came out of a Stephen King novel, she is such a strawman type caricature of a religious nut.
  But the real reason to watch this movie is Stephen Geoffreys. Best known as the weird friend Ed in Fright Night, here he plays a deeply disturbed nerdy kid pushed to the brink and becomes a psychotic demon. Geoffreys plays it to the hilt, and he is always fascinating to watch. I just wish that the makeup on him throughout his demon possession wasn't so half assed. Plus, his killing spree feels too limited by the budget. The effects on the house at the end were impressive, but largely unnecessary to the plot and that money would have been better put towards the demon makeup and fight scenes.
  The other thing of note about this movie is that it was directed by Robert Englund. I thought it was directed just fine. You can tell that he had experience with effects heavy movies prior to this, even if it was in front of the camera at the time. The only other movie he's directed is Killer Pad, which I don't hear good things about.



Offline Russoguru

  • The FBI Pays Me to Surf
  • *
  • Posts: 2284
  • Liked: 191
  • "He's never fought me twice!"
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18153 on: July 31, 2018, 07:09:48 AM »
Avengers: Infinity War - While I am not a fan at all of digital releases(which I'll get into in the next paragraph), I just had to pre-order the digital version from Google Play. I just watched it again this morning and... still loved it just as much as the four previous times I watched it. Not sure there's much that can be said about the movie that hasn't already been said. It blends action and emotion so well, the story is just so tightly nit, everything is so masterly crafted. The Avengers and the Guardians teaming up is just amazing and Thanos is just one of the best villains in the history of cinema.

Now... here's why I do NOT like buying my movies digitally. At some point during a movie you're watching at home, you may need to pause once or twice to get a snack or go to the bathroom. I paused the movie a couple times and now... one last time during the closing credits. I unpaused to a screen where the credits were stuck, not moving at all while the music continued, and this whole time I have been writing this post I still see a symbol in the middle of my TV screen, indicating that it's buffering. Did I mention I'm watching this on my PS3? So I'm pretty sure this extended period of buffering is NOT the fault of my hardware. But it does raise the question, what if I paused halfway during the movie and this happened? I'd have to restart and fast-forward my way all the way to the right part of the movie. My friends, I don't care how awesome it is in theory to have a digital release ahead of the physical release of a movie... I firmly say this now and forever-- the physical release wins... EVERY TIME over the digital release.

With a physical release of the movie I can lend it to a friend, I can watch it any DVD or Blu-ray device, I don't have to worry about internet outages. Above all that though, there's just nothing like it to actually hold a legit copy of the movie in your hand. If you're anything like me at all(and God help you if you are), you just want to hold your newly purchased copy of Avengers: Infinity War, hold it up towards the heavens to God(assuming he's actually up there) so he can look down on you while you say "Yes! I have this now!!!!"


Offline Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 27029
  • Liked: 5226
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18154 on: August 05, 2018, 09:10:44 AM »
Christopher Robin - This was wonderfully charming. Good performances all around, and absolutely fantastic CGI. I do think it went into the business dealings a little too much, as the kids weren't going to follow or care about any of that. The end "action scene" in the suitcase being dragged behind the truck was unnecessary and excessive. But those are minor gripes.
I definitely recommend it, especially if you liked the charming Paddington movies.



Offline stethacantus

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 578
  • Liked: 39
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18155 on: August 05, 2018, 10:21:18 PM »
Avenging Eagle ( 1978)
One of my favorite Shaw Brothers films. But unfortunately not the complete film. When Celestial began restoring the Shaw Brothers film library, they reportedly found a number of masters negatives had been damaged. Wikipedia reports that a minute and a half of the final fight was removed for being damaged. This is evident because you can clearly see where Ti Lung is fighting a room filled with guards while Fu Sheng attacks the villain Ku Feng by literally kicking the staircase out from under him. Suddenly Ku Feng is standing upright in a corner of the room and Ti Lung and Fu Sheng are standing over the bodies of the guards who are all suddenly dead. Not reported by Wikipedia is missing footage midway through the film where Ti Lung is being tortured. I still have all of the missing footage on my old VHS bootleg of the same movie. With copies of this film in the hands of collectors, one can only ask why Celestial never bothered to seek out the missing footage for a full restoration. Perhaps because they need to restore and release hundreds of Shaw Brothers films in a short period of time, so did not have the time to track down the missing footage on the odd film. But Dragon Dynasty could have. Except of course that Dragon Dynasty seems satisfied with releasing incomplete prints. Hopefully some other company will agree to release the Shaw Brothers films on physical media, and will take the time to restoring the missing footage.

Mega Snake ( 2007)
Should I even be relieved that the studio that made this week's film is not Asylum as I first thought? After all, it still is a made for SyFy film. On the positive side, the studio, Nu Image, has recently produced a lot of legitimate theatrical action movies that made money, if not pleased critics. So perhaps this could be a better than normal SyFy movie? I have seen it before, but I wouldn't remember. You see, at the time I fast forwarded most of the film looking for the cameo appearance of the film's star.

Perhaps an explanation. Back in 2006 SyFy, then still called Sci-Fi Channel, decided to get in on the reality show trend with a series called Who Wants To Be A Superhero. The premise, a group of cosplayers competed to be picked by Stan Lee himself as an official superhero. Millions of nerds sent in audition tapes with them wearing the costume of an original superhero they invented, out of which about ten were chosen to live together in a loft where they were to continue pretending to be their superhero alter ego.

Every now and then they would be contacted via television screen by Stan Lee who would send the group on a mission. How well each member performed determined which three would be picked for the elimination round, and out of that three Stan Lee ( via screen again ) would decided which one was going home for not having enough superhero qualities. A lot of the time the true goal of a mission was kept secret. For example, during a mission where each individual contestant was asked to race from one end of a park to another as fast as they could, a child actor on the path pretended to be lost and cried for his mother. The contestants who didn't stop to help the child lost the mission, and was eligible for the elimination round.

The series was not very good, making The Joe Schmo Show look like Citizen Kane in comparison. And for what was supposed to be a reality competition, it had the appearance of either being fixed or scripted. Many mission seemed to be designed for a specific hero to fail. One contestant, Lemuria, was chosen via an internet poll. And of course the comic book nerds all picked the hottest looking girl with the sexiest costume instead of the hero in the poll with the best powers. Lemuria managed to ace every mission and secret mission, never giving the producers any reason for putting her in the elimination round. That is until she was in the final four. The mission was for each contestant to approach a prisoner on a chain gang and touch them, either by a hug or patting them on the back. The prisoner Lemuria was to touch refused to allow her to come near her, and since she didn't complete her task she was eliminated. However, the chain gang wasn't real, but was once again actors, and it was either by script or that actors decision not to allow Lemuria to come near her. It should also be pointed out that the second place prize was for the top three contestants was to get their own Dark Horse comic book. Which was incentive enough to fix the game so that Dark Horse got the three heroes they wanted instead of being stuck with one of the lame  heroes.

The grand prize for the winner was for his own Sci-Fi superhero movie. The winner of the season was Matthew Atherton who's superhero was called Feedback. Months went by without any word when the feedback movie would air.  Once he had his own IMDb page, Matthew began talking to his fans on the message board, telling them Sci-Fi never got back to him about the movie, and as far as he could tell the movie was not happening. However, if they wanted a Feedback movie they should write to the channel and demand  one be made.

The second season of Who Wants To Be A Superhero debuted and still no Feedback film. Then suddenly Sci-Fi announced that Feedback would star in the movie Mega Snake. Promos made it seem as if Feedback was the main character and would battle the giant snake. Good thing I decided to put the movie on DVR rather than watch it live. The first thing I noticed was Atherton was not even listed as an actor in the opening credits. Just the guy from Stargate SG-1 and a bunch of unknowns. He wasn't even listed as "special appearance", "guest starring" or "and Mathew Atherton as Feedback". I knew instantly that if he was in the film at all, it would be a cameo. So I fast forwarded the movie, waiting for Feedback to show up. It doesn't happen until almost the end of the film. Feedback is making an appearance at an amusement park that the Mega Snake attacks. But just as he is about to get into an epic battle, he notices children and instead helps them evacuated the park. And that's it for the rest of the film. He doesn't even return to fight the snake.

A little later we all found out the obvious. Due to mounting hate mail from comic book geeks, Sci-Fi took a television movie already in the can and had some extra footage with Feedback shot and edited into the film. This is obvious as the scene with Feedback seems to have been shot in the dead of winter while the rest of the movie was shot during the fall.  Still, Feedback faired better than the Season 2 winner,  Defusor. Instead of editing his character  into an existing Sci-fi film, they gave the actor who played him a bit part as a deputy in some other film. To this day there is no Sci-Fi or SyFy film with Defusor in it.

Which brings up the following question; Is SyFy run by morons? They commission hundreds of crap television movies a year, and they couldn't make a Feedback or Defusor movie instead of billions of movies with hybrid predators? The Feedback and Defusor films already had promotion from two seasons of a hit reality show, as well as promotion from Dark Horse. It was not as if both wouldn't get huge ratings. And let's not forget, THEY ALREADY PROMISED THE MOVIES AS THE GRAND PRIZES OF A REALITY SHOW. That means the network is sort of legally bound to make those movies. They are just lucky both actors settled  for the films
they were given. And because SyFy reneged on the prize, Stan Lee refused to do a third season of the reality show. I mean, come on! For the price of Sharktapus vs Mooseagator they could have made  a superhero film that their viewers would actually watch.

I probably would have never added this film to my superhero collection if not for a friend who remembered it and reminded me there is a Feedback film. So, how much screen time should a superhero have before the film is considered a superhero film? As Mega Snake has recently gone OOP, I didn't have the luxury of thinking about it for a few months. There was only a couple of reasonably priced copies left on Amazon.

And BTW, Feedback is only in 1 minute 15 seconds of combined screen time.

The good news is that this is not a bad film. The bad news is that it is pure formula. Jaws meets Gremlins meets Them. In a stereotypical Southern town, somewhere in East Tennessee ( but actually Bulgaria where the film was shot ), a snake wrangler goes to a shop run by a Native American to buy some rare poisonous snakes. There he sees a snake in a jar, and asks the shop owner what it is. He is told that it is Unteka, basically one of the last living babies of a creature that once terrorized North America before the Native Americans successfully wiped them out. Apparently keeping a baby in a jar will bring good luck, but only as long as three rules are followed:

1. Never let Unteka out of the jar.

2. Never feed it anything living

3. Never fear the heart of the snake

The wrangler wants to buy Unteka, but is told it is not for sale. So, of course, he steals it. And of course with a few minutes of getting the jar home he drops and breaks it. And before you know it, Unteka has eaten a kitten, all the chickens in the coop, the dog, and finally the wrangler and everyone else in his house, growing bigger each time it eats, and leaving nothing behind but the blood of it's victims.

The next day the wranger's brother ( Michael Shanks from Stargate SG-1 )   returns home after a night of drunkenness to find the house wrecked and nothing but blood. He calls the sheriff and is immediately suspected of being the killer. There is a love rectangle between Stargate guy, his girlfriend who is a deputy, the sheriff named Big Bo who is also trying to woo the deputy, and Stargate guy's female co-worker who is always trying to seduce him, and also flirts with Big Bo. The love rectangle exists purely for padding out the film, and ultimately has nothing to do with the main plot, with the possible exception that Big Bo makes Stargate guy a suspected only because he is a rival for the deputy. Of course there is another motive. The deputy, who happened to have studied zoology in school, suspects that what has killed the family, as well as a nearby field of goats, is actually a giant snake. Except the mayor doesn't want to hear this because, you guessed it, the town is about to have an annual festival, and the mayor does not want rumors of a giant snake driving away the tourist. And Big Bo is all too eager to appease the mayor by saying that Stargate guy not only slaughtered his family and pets, but must have also killed the goats as well.

Meanwhile Unteka has begun eating everyone in the cast one by one until only Stargate guy, the deputy and the Native American are left. And only Native American guy knows how to kill Unteka. They realize that Unteka's next target is the festival. The film then shifts to an amusement park which is supposed to be the festival and Unteka has begun killing and eating tourists left and right. Cue the edited in footage of Feedback where the crowd is suddenly bundled up in winter coats, their frozen breath can be seen whenever someone talks, and it even appears to be filmed at a different amusement park. Once the Feedback cameo is over, it is back to the main cast who track Unteka into a haunted house ride, and go in after it for the final confrontation.

Something that surprised me was that the box claims the film is R rated, for creature violence and gore. But there is nothing in this film that should have earned it an R rating. Jaws had gore, and nudity ( which this film does not have ) and mild swearing ( which this film does not have ) and still got a PG. This is a made for broadcast movie. It would never have gotten an MPAA rating. But assuming this was given a brief theatrical release, I doubt a made for tv movie would get an R rating. So did the company releasing this film on DVD lie about the rating to get more people to buy/rent it? If so, they are lucky the MPAA didn't sue them. All but the X ratings are copyrighted. A precaution the MPAA took to prevent any distributor from putting their own ratings on their films.

Monkey Business ( 1931 )
This was the first of the Marx Brothers films to be given the screen credit "The Four Marx Brothers".  This time Zeppo's role is bigger than the last couple of films. Primarily because Paramount finally realized he should be cast as the love interest instead of someone else. This was one of the three Marx Brothers films that would occasionally air around 1am on a local station, and I had already seen the second half, so this is the first time I got to see the entire film. It was the first original script Paramount wrote for the March Brothers, the first two films being adaptions of musicals they started in on Broadway. Unlike the later MGM films,  the first two musical adaptions, Monkey Business has the brothers running around aimlessly. If not for Zeppo falling in love with the girl who is kidnapped in the last act, there would have been no excuse for the brothers to try to save her. The wonderful Margaret Dumont is not in this film, and has been replaced with Thelma Todd. While I am a big Thelma Todd fan ( she is the only actresses from old Hollywood films that occasionally gives me a boner, and I have found her funny in a lot of her Hal Roach films ), I think she was completely miscast in this film.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2018, 10:31:41 PM by stethacantus »


Offline Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 27029
  • Liked: 5226
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18156 on: August 06, 2018, 07:33:47 AM »
OK, now I want a Sharktapus vs Mooseagator movie.



Offline wihogfan

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 681
  • Liked: 90
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18157 on: August 08, 2018, 07:01:25 PM »
Piranha (1978)
Shout! was hyping it due to it being 40 years old and the last time I had seen it was probably on a VHS tape. Wife enjoyed it. I found it to be nothing more than a blatant and very by the numbers Jaws rip off and to be just as boring as I find Jaws to be (and as boring as I find most Spielberg movies for that matter).

Killer Fish (1979)
Expected killer fish. Got a few cut scenes of piranhas from Piranha of fish and no other special effects other than red colored water. Boring movie about a jewel heist from a refinery (no idea why a refinery had jewels) starring Lee Majors and the dude from the 2nd Plant of the Apes movie. Made Piranha look like Citizen Kane.

Humanoids from the Deep (1980)
Enjoyed it the most of the 4 movies I saw recently. Doug McClure looking very old and Vic Morrow playing very racist in regards to the one American Indian in the movie. Shocking amount of unnecessary nudity (at least in this day and age of PG13 horror movies) and I really could have done without all the monsters raping, but the last 30 minutes of the fish infected with the silly explanation of "DNA 5" running wild and the Alien ripoff ending were entertaining.

Piranha 2-The Spawning
No idea what the plot was really supposed to be. Worst of the 4. Flying piranhas should make for entertainment, but didn't. Made the other 3 movies  (even the tedious Killer Fish) seem great by comparison. 
« Last Edit: August 08, 2018, 07:10:11 PM by wihogfan »


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Compsognathus
  • *****
  • Posts: 10950
  • Liked: 2293
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18158 on: August 08, 2018, 08:12:43 PM »
Humanoids from the Deep (1980)
Enjoyed it the most of the 4 movies I saw recently. Doug McClure looking very old and Vic Morrow playing very racist in regards to the one American Indian in the movie. Shocking amount of unnecessary nudity (at least in this day and age of PG13 horror movies) and I really could have done without all the monsters raping, but the last 30 minutes of the fish infected with the silly explanation of "DNA 5" running wild and the Alien ripoff ending were entertaining.

Barbara Peeters was not happy that Corman brought in an uncredited director to add the rape scenes and more nudity.  Corman had his formula for exploitation and Petters version didn't check all the boxes.


Offline Lesbunny

  • Magneto-cent Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 464
  • Liked: 192
  • Dunno why I came back
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18159 on: August 08, 2018, 11:35:38 PM »
The missus and I watched Crank recently. The last time I'd seen it was high school, and it was just as entertaining as I remembered. Definitely not a GOOD film, but fun with a good gimmick to make sure the action doesn't stop. It's essentially Speed, but for heart rates! Weirdly, I don't find Jason Statham boring or dull in the role, and I hate most of his other action roles. Guess it must be because it's fun to say Chev Chelios.


Offline Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 27029
  • Liked: 5226
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18160 on: August 12, 2018, 07:28:34 PM »
The Meg - I had a blast with this! In a world of decades of Jaws knockoffs, this film is smart enough to not do that at all. Yes there are Jaws references, but they are mostly just similar bits, not wholesale copies. And the one shot that was a direct copy was fantastic. But most importantly it's not a plot ripoff, so there is no mayor who won't close the beaches, and everything else that has become a bad cliché by this point.
If I have any complaint is that the attack on the beach was not nearly the bloodbath I was hoping for. But that is what we have Pirahna 3D for.



Offline Charles Castle

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 797
  • Liked: 459
  • I crap bigger than this movie.
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18161 on: August 12, 2018, 07:59:43 PM »
The Survivor (1981, David Hemmings) is a film I remember seeing on HBO way back in the early 1980s. While I say that I remember seeing it, I only remember seeing it because the plane crash that opens the film is spectacular and legitimately terrifying. It sticks in the memory. The rest? I vaguely remembered some of the film's ghostly shenanigans (the dude lured onto the train tracks for instance), and I remembered Jenny Agutter, but only in fragments. It turns out that there's a reason for that. It's a slow, meandering film that has none of the pulp vitality you would expect from a film based on a James Herbert novel. And yet, here it is.

The story follows pilot Keller (sad-eyed Robert Powell), a pilot who walks away from a plane crash unscathed while 350 passengers and crew burn to death behind him. He doesn't remember the crash or the events that cause it, but he very much wants to know because he's carrying some guilt around with him. He had been sleeping with the wife of one of the crash victims, something the investigators find very suspicious. Suspicious, too, are the mysterious deaths attending on people looking to profit from the crash, accompanied by spectral visitations from the children killed in the crash. Also in the mix is Hobbs, a local psychic who hears the screams of the victims in her head. This all builds to a twist ending that casts the film as an elaborate variant of The Twilight Zone, though at considerably longer length.

This has an unusual mix of talent and circumstances. It was the most expensive Australian film up to its time, intended perhaps as a prestige production to ride the crest of the Australian New Wave. It was not intended as an exploitation film, which is surprising given the source of the material. James Herbert was known for a two-fisted pulp sensibility rather than delicate mood pieces. This film tries for delicate and moody, a decision its producers regret. In this it's aided by cinematographer John Searle, who would go on to a career as a world class director of photography, and by composer Brian May, who is perhaps best known for his work on the Mad Max films. Director David Hemmings was in the process of re-inventing his career in Australia, transitioning from acting to directing (he appeared in Rod Hardy's perverse vampire film, Thirst, a year before making this film). He had more success with the second film he directed in Australia, The Race for the Yankee Zephyr. Hemmings's filmmaking in The Survivor is tastefully restrained, resulting in an overall feeling of melancholy rather than dread. This is a surprisingly sunlit movie for a film about ghosts.

The film's actors contribute to the film's sense of melancholy, too. Its leads are ringers from Hollywood and England after all. This is Joseph Cotten's last film, and he doesn't have much to do besides look pained as a local priest. Robert Powell made two films in the Ozploitation boom. He is cool and remote here, and his appearance in a pilot's uniform tends to recall his role as Captain Walker in Ken Russell's Tommy. Powell's screen presence and performance are both calculated to alienate the audience, which is a flaw in the way the film is conceived. Jenny Agutter started her career in Austraila in Nicolas Roeg's Walkabout ten years before this film, and doesn't seem out of place in the film's universe. The filmmakers have accentuated Agutter's alien-ness by dressing her in eccentric, proto-Goth outfits, perhaps as a means of providing visual clues to her character's psychic powers. Of the principle actors, Agutter is the one who connects with the viewer.

The plane crash that begins the film was staged at full scale and is absolutely stunning. It compares favorably to any similar scene in a Hollywood production and puts the film's budget on the screen where it can be seen by everyone. It's the most viscerally terrifying part of the movie and it's what sticks in the mind after you've seen it. The rest of the film can't hope to measure up to it, and it rarely even tries. Instead, the plot meanders until its twist ending. In between, it indulges in an elegant variation of the punishment narratives that used to be the bread and butter of EC comics, in which horrid people get their comeuppance, though this is less ghastly than any of those stories ever were. The ghastliness is conspicuous by its absence. The film's use of ghost children almost seems lazy, given the cliche they represent. This is very much in the mold of Mario Bava's Kill Baby Kill and it's sinister ghost child, though without Bava's theatrics. The twist at the end is transparent almost from the get-go, but in the context of the film, it seems more foreordained than predictable. Ghost stories are highly ritualized, after all, and this film is no different.

Writer James Herbert himself reportedly didn't like this film at all (nor did he like Deadly Eyes, based on another of his novels). It's easy to see why. Herbert's books are plot driven, and a good plot to Herbert is one that provided ghastly set pieces at regular intervals. The Survivor doesn't manage that. It's a film full of ciphers rather than characters and we know no more about them at the end of the film than we did at the beginning. This is a film that lacks for dramatic weight and fails to make up for that by throwing some red meat to the groundlings. Red meat--an instinct for the jugular--is precisely the element hovering in the negative spaces. The audience knows it's there for the taking, and when the film comes to its end and that instinct for the jugular remains unsated, it makes for a dry, dull film experience. Alas.
You know, if the space man puma thing turns out to be the correct religion, I for one will be very surprised.


Offline stethacantus

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 578
  • Liked: 39
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18162 on: August 12, 2018, 10:32:20 PM »
Iron Bodyguard ( 1973 )
I was surprised when Tokyo Shock released this Shaw Brothers movie on DVD. Much like Dragon Dynasty, Tokyo Shock went after the most popular Shaw Brothers titles. This, however, was one of the more obscure films, jointly directed by Chang Cheh and Pao Hair Li. The first time I watched it I ended up enjoying it, despite it's slow pace in the first half. The star was Chen Kuan Tai, one of Shaw Brothers more underrated actors. A shame his best films are still unreleased in North America thanks to Dragon Dynasty. But this one comes so very close to being like them.

Chen plays a master Swordsman who befriends a politician who wants to bring reform to China. When the Empress has him and other reformers arrested and sentenced to be executed without a trial, Chen decides to rescue them. All he needs is the inside help of a police official he believes is his friend. But instead he is betrayed, and he and the other men attempting the rescue end up in a trap. Chen is the lone survivor, and vows vengeance against the police official who set him up.

In the tradition of Boxer From Shantung and Man of Iron, Chen becomes a one man killing machine as he cuts his way through hundreds of armed guards in a failed attempt to save his friend from execution. While the ending is slightly anticlimactic ( he goes after the cop who betrayed him instead of the head villain ) it is still a really good martial arts film. A near classic.

Sinister Squad ( 2016 )
A while back when I began adding the mockbusters of superhero films to my superhero movie collection, I mentioned there was still one left I had yet to buy. An Asylum rip off of Suicide Squad called Sinister Squad. After several weeks of Asylum films and those horrible films from TomCat, I wanted a break, and did so by watching a bunch of MCU films. Now that I am coming close to completing my collection with a handful of X-Men, MCU and DC universe films left, along with a few more obscure and most likely awful films from the genre, I have little choice but to get to the last two Asylum films. Yes, that's right, two. They just released a sequel to Avengers Grimm last month to coincide with the Avengers Infinity War

The most entertaining thing about this film is the trailers for other Asylum films. ( Such as a hybrid Western and zombie film with a cast almost entirely from various boy bands. ) Once again all Asylum cared about was getting their mockbuster on the shelf fast enough to trick the gullible into thinking it was Suicide Squad. Otherwise very little effort was put into this film. Alice from Wonderland runs a prison for Storybook villains. Not only didn't wardrobe bother to make Alice her traditional outfit, but the actress playing her didn't even bother to dye her hair blonde. Helping her run her prison, and capture the villains, is Tweedle Dum and Tweedle ( once again no costume ) The Pide Piper of Hamelin ( once again, no costume, only modern clothes. ) and Goldilocks ( once again, no costume ). And talking about no costume, one of the inmates at Alice's prison is The Big Bad Wolf. But instead of Wolfman makeup, all they give the actor is fake fangs. The Grimm Reaper wants to leave the underworld and rule Earth, but the only way to do that is through Rumplestiltskin, who is also a prisoner of Alice. He sends an army of his followers to assault the prison, free Rumplestiltskin, and steal back his scythe that for some reason Alice has possession of, because he needs it to ascend to Earth. BTW, the prison is just some wearhouse, and almost the entire film takes place at this location. Once again, no attempt to build a proper prison set, or any other set. The guys who made this film just didn't give a f@#k. Alice convinces the convicts to join together and defend the prison, but almost immediately each betrays Alice. There is really no squad in this film at all. It is just 90 minutes of a waste of time that had the potential to be much better if only Asylum put more production value in their films.


Horse Feathers ( 1932 )
Zeppo gets a bigger role in this film, which includes a couple of scenes where he gets to sing. This time around he is almost has equal screen time as his brothers. The climax at a football game seems too overly familiar. In fact, most of the gag here turned up in other football comedies. I'd like to think they all originated in this film, but I am sure I had seen some of those gags in silent  movies as well.
.


Offline NRRork

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1310
  • Liked: 77
    • Yep, I have a deviantART gallery. But it's pretty cheerful drawings-- no angsty poems or black-and-white photos of wooden chairs.
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18163 on: August 13, 2018, 05:20:12 PM »
Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales

I'd heard it wasn't very good, but I got curious. At least there was sense to it unlike the last movie, but it was derivative as all hell, way too much like the first movie. But worse than that, it was just BORING! Like, The Force Awakens was rightly accused of being derivative of the first Star Wars, but I still had fun WATCHING it and liked the characters and the tone. This just... bored me.

It was about zombie pirate hunters and I was BORED! HOW DO YOU EVEN MANAGE THAT!?

I used to have an image here, but Photobucket got cheap about remote linking. I guess I'll have to think of something witty instead. Which I will. Later. It caught me by surprise, in all honesty. It's hard to be clever on command, I mean, YOU try it. Be funny: NOW! See, tough. So, gimme a bit, 'kay?


Offline WhyDontTheyLook

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 925
  • Liked: 61
  • Tell me.
    • GaryWOlson.com
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18164 on: August 14, 2018, 07:50:01 AM »
Watched The Meg last Saturday, enjoyed it a lot.  A quintessential big dumb (but not stupid) fun monster movie, right up my alley.

Watched Megalodon on SyFy last night, one of a number of new cheesy shark movies coming on this week ahead of the last Sharknado.  It was another Asylum train wreck, low even by their standards.  Not just bad; dull bad.
"You never know, in a tight jam a nuclear missile just might come in handy."