Author Topic: What was the last movie you watched?  (Read 1267327 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Johnny Unusual

  • Tells No Tales
  • *
  • Posts: 23607
  • Liked: 3808
  • Now you're playing with power!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17310 on: July 13, 2017, 04:32:51 PM »
Yeah, Krull is kind of stupid fun but not something I'm excited to revisit.

I think House 2 is bad, but its watchably bad.  It's a small scene but John Ratzenberger is a highlight as an electrician and implies all electricians are familiar with the supernatural and go on adventures.  I'm down with that premise.  The worst thing is the cute monster sidekick.  Now, I'm actually pretty forgiving of cute (I actually like Ewoks), but this one is so pandering that it is a pretty big turn-off.


Offline RoninFox

  • Mr Bungle
  • *
  • Posts: 13849
  • Liked: 2298
    • Ronin Fox Trax
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17311 on: July 14, 2017, 05:25:02 AM »
Yeah, Krull is kind of stupid fun but not something I'm excited to revisit.

I think House 2 is bad, but its watchably bad.  It's a small scene but John Ratzenberger is a highlight as an electrician and implies all electricians are familiar with the supernatural and go on adventures.  I'm down with that premise.  The worst thing is the cute monster sidekick.  Now, I'm actually pretty forgiving of cute (I actually like Ewoks), but this one is so pandering that it is a pretty big turn-off.

John Ratzenberger is -the- reason to watch House II. Erica and I reference one of his lines in our daily lives with surprising frequency.
RoninFoxTrax Presents The Thing

gum.co/RFTthing


Offline Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26237
  • Liked: 4953
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17312 on: July 14, 2017, 06:30:57 AM »
Yeah, Krull is kind of stupid fun but not something I'm excited to revisit.

I think House 2 is bad, but its watchably bad.  It's a small scene but John Ratzenberger is a highlight as an electrician and implies all electricians are familiar with the supernatural and go on adventures.  I'm down with that premise.  The worst thing is the cute monster sidekick.  Now, I'm actually pretty forgiving of cute (I actually like Ewoks), but this one is so pandering that it is a pretty big turn-off.

John Ratzenberger is -the- reason to watch House II. Erica and I reference one of his lines in our daily lives with surprising frequency.
Royal Dano as the zombie grandfather is great too.



Offline Jesse412

  • Magneto-cent Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 348
  • Liked: 0
  • Old Curmudgeon
    • My deviantART Gallery
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17313 on: July 14, 2017, 09:53:06 AM »
Phenomena (1985) [Extended Cut]



A sleeping walking girl who communicates with insects teams up with a scientist in a wheelchair and his pet chimp to stop a serial killer.  Jennifer Connelly plays an interesting twist on the "Final Girl" trope and I always enjoy seeing Donald Pleasence show up in a horror movie.  While this starts as a typical slasher there is a lot happening and some interesting ideas being used.  It has mystery, suspense, a creepy use of live insects and some gory kills.  I thought the the reveal of the killer's motivation was interesting.  The climax of the film delivers a lot and just when you thought the film was at its peak there's more.
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Offline Jesse412

  • Magneto-cent Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 348
  • Liked: 0
  • Old Curmudgeon
    • My deviantART Gallery
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17314 on: July 14, 2017, 09:54:36 AM »
Martin (1978 film)



I thought this was super creepy, an interesting take on modern vampires and one of George Romero's better films.
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Online The Lurker

  • Dragon Ryder
  • ***
  • Posts: 6705
  • Liked: 3653
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17315 on: July 14, 2017, 11:38:41 AM »
Phenomena (1985) [Extended Cut]



A sleeping walking girl who communicates with insects teams up with a scientist in a wheelchair and his pet chimp to stop a serial killer.  Jennifer Connelly plays an interesting twist on the "Final Girl" trope and I always enjoy seeing Donald Pleasence show up in a horror movie.  While this starts as a typical slasher there is a lot happening and some interesting ideas being used.  It has mystery, suspense, a creepy use of live insects and some gory kills.  I thought the the reveal of the killer's motivation was interesting.  The climax of the film delivers a lot and just when you thought the film was at its peak there's more.
" Do do do do do..."


Offline Jesse412

  • Magneto-cent Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 348
  • Liked: 0
  • Old Curmudgeon
    • My deviantART Gallery
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17316 on: July 14, 2017, 12:16:12 PM »
Inferno (1980)



I didn't like this as much as I liked Suspiria the first time I watched that but this is still pretty high quality.
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Offline Johnny Unusual

  • Tells No Tales
  • *
  • Posts: 23607
  • Liked: 3808
  • Now you're playing with power!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17317 on: July 14, 2017, 02:02:41 PM »
Yeah, Suspiria's is Argento's best film, in my opinion (though Profondo Rosso AKA Deep Red has some truly great moments and one of the most over the top death scenes in any more).  It's a shame his more recent output has been just plain sucky.


Offline Jesse412

  • Magneto-cent Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 348
  • Liked: 0
  • Old Curmudgeon
    • My deviantART Gallery
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17318 on: July 14, 2017, 04:42:47 PM »
Graveyard Disturbance (1987)



Arguably one of Lamberto Bava's worst films, granted it was made for TV at the time.  It also features a couple of actors that appeared in Dario Argento's Demons.  There are some pretty decent special effects makeups but this movie is terrible.  Nothing happens for the first 40 minutes.  Things do eventually pick up slightly.  There really should be an episode of RiffTrax or MST3K that features this movie.
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Offline Jesse412

  • Magneto-cent Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 348
  • Liked: 0
  • Old Curmudgeon
    • My deviantART Gallery
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17319 on: July 14, 2017, 04:45:31 PM »
City of the Living Dead (1980)



I watched this the other night and thought it had some really cool special effects makeups.  One of the best out of the Italian stuff I've seen so far.  Super scary, a little gory and definitely something I plan on rewatching.  I enjoyed The House by the Cemetery when TCM showed in a while back and I also plan on checking out The Beyond when I get the chance.
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Offline Jesse412

  • Magneto-cent Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 348
  • Liked: 0
  • Old Curmudgeon
    • My deviantART Gallery
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17320 on: July 16, 2017, 10:25:31 AM »
Slipstream (1989)



I thought some of the casting was pretty good and felt there were some interesting concepts being used.  The pacing towards the middle was a bit slow at points but there are still some exciting action scenes throughout.  In a post apocalypse world people travel by powerful air currents.  Mark Hamill plays a bounty hunter who has captured a wanted murderer played by Bob Peck.  Bill Paxton kidnaps the fugitive hoping to collect the reward for himself but ends up befriending him instead.  The buildup of their friendship felt genuine and the reveal that Byron is an android was unexpected.  The ending has a bit of tragedy and a climactic confrontation.
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Offline Johnny Unusual

  • Tells No Tales
  • *
  • Posts: 23607
  • Liked: 3808
  • Now you're playing with power!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17321 on: July 16, 2017, 10:32:23 AM »
Baby Driver

This was a pure delight.  Edgar Wright has yet make a movie I didn't love and this one continues this trend.  It's nice to see Kevin Spacey in something I enjoyed, as it feels like it has been a long while.  Looking forward to rewatching the purely joyful "Baby gets coffee" scene, which is filled with a lot of fun visuals and actual lyrics to the song hidden in the background.


Offline Jesse412

  • Magneto-cent Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 348
  • Liked: 0
  • Old Curmudgeon
    • My deviantART Gallery
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17322 on: July 16, 2017, 10:54:11 AM »
Tetsuo: The Iron Man (1989)



This is like a David Lynch film and a Cronenberg movie gave birth to a fucked up LSD and meth fueled nightmare.  It's industrial noir, surreal, creepy and disturbing, violent and sexually charged.  It's body horror with elements of cyberpunk.  It blurs the line between insanity and artistic expression.  The score perfectly fits the intensity of the visuals.  It left me wondering what the hell I just watched but also made me want to immediately watch it again.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2017, 03:21:12 PM by Jesse412 »
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Offline stethacantus

  • Magneto-cent Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 437
  • Liked: 17
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17323 on: July 16, 2017, 10:52:06 PM »
Schindlers List ( 1993 )
Hook was a huge disaster for Spielberg. Not a financial disaster. It made $300 million on a $70 million budget. But it would go on to be Spielberg's worst reviewed film leading some to question if the director was finally past his prime. Spielberg would answer those critics back just a year later with two films he directed within a year. One was Jurassic Park, which became the first in his most successful film franchise to date. ( I have had the first batch of Jurassic Park films for over ten years, so they are not part of this current Spielberg marathon. ) The other was Schindlers List. While Jurassic Park was something made for the summer audiences craving a good popcorn movie, Schindler's List was made for the winter audiences craving Academy Award worthy films. Universal had bought the rights to the film back in 1983 for Spielberg in a mistaken belief that Spielberg wanted to direct the movie. But at the time Spielberg was into escapist fantasy, and was not interested in directing a drama about The Holocaust. Out of guilt he agreed to be the film's producer. For the next five years Spielberg attempted to find an A list director willing to direct it, finally talking Martin Scorsese into taking on the film in 1988. But soon after finally finding a director, Spielberg decided he wanted to direct Schindler's List himself, and traded Scorsese the Cape Fear remake for it.

The basic true life story, in the 1940s Austrian businessman Oskar Schindler takes advantage of Nazi Germany's anti Jewish laws and is able to get free forced Jewish labor for his factory in Poland, of which he earns a fortune. However, as the Jews are gradually exterminated, Schindler gradually begins to feel empathy for the Jews, and horror for how they are being killed off. Realizing that the Jews working for his factories are exempt from being sent to the death camps, he arranges for over 1,200 Jewish workers to work at his factory to keep them safe, which inevitably involves so many bribes that he spends his entire fortune saving them. When the war finally ends Schindler is destitute, but has managed to save thousands of Jews from extermination.

It is interesting to see how Spielberg's attitude to the Second World War changed over the years as depicted through his films. 1941 showed us a cartoon version of the homefront. This attitude continued in the Indiana Jones films, which take place in the years just prior to the outbreak of war. Nazis are seen as evil, but more the way the villians in a James Bond movie are evil. In other words, comic book evil.  In Empire of the Sun  we get our first hint that the war had horrors. Still, while the Japanese treated their prisoners of war so harshly that many died, they were not intentionally exterminating people the way the Nazis were. Schindler's List pulls no punches in revealing how evil the Nazis really were, or how horrific their crimes against humanity were.

The movie runs 3 hours and 17 minutes, but feels nowhere near as long. This was Spielberg at his best, and despite Jaws being his only movie in my all time favorite top 10, I have to admit that this seemes to be his best movie. Okay, so it is hard to love a movie based on true events where thousands of innocent people, including children,  are being murdered right before your eyes. Where so many Jewish bodies are being incinerated that their ashes fall from the sky like a constant snow. Where the local concentration camp commandant gets his thrills by shooting random Jews in the camp from the balcony of his hillside villa. Or seeing all the children of the camp rounded up and put on trucks and driven away never to be seen again. The few to survive this culling having done so by hiding in the shit covered water of the bottom of a latrine. And no one, not their parents, not even Schindler, able to do anything about it. Sure this was Spielberg's greatest film achievement, but one that is impossible to love like his other films. ( To be fair, there are still a lot of other Spielberg directed films I have not seen yet, so calling this his best is just an educated guess. I may prove myself wrong. )

Another great achievement is that after years of trying to end his movies as tear jerkers, he finally does so with this movie. No so much with the scene of Oskar Schindler breaking down in tears as he leaves behind the Jews he saved, realizing he could have saved a few more had he sold his car so he had more money for bribes. No, that part is sad, but it is not what put tears in my eyes. It is the scene that followed. The movie ends in present time ( or at least 1993 when the movie was made ) at the grave of Oskar Schindler where thousands of the real life survivors who worked at his factory drop by to honor him, each placing a stone on his gravestone. For anyone who had watched the entire film, it is impossible to get through this scene without weeping. Not just proof that the events in this movie were real, but proof that so many survived to live a full life.


Iceman ( 2014 )
Talking about what movies are among my all time favorites, one of them was a 1989 Hong Kong movie called The Iceman Cometh. No, it was not some sort of adaption of the classic Eugene O'Neill play, but actually a remake of the cult sci-fi film Time After Time ( 1979 ). In that movie, Jack the Ripper steals a time machine invented by H.G. Wells and travels to the present ( or at least 1979 when the film was made ). Mortified that Jack the Ripper has been unleashed into the future, which he also assumes must be a peaceful utopia, H.G. Wells uses his time machine to go after the Ripper and return him to his own time to face justice. A nice little fantasy film with a small cult following that recently was adapted into a short lived television series on ABC. But for The Iceman Cometh, while the basic plot was kept, the studio did away with Jack the Ripper and H.G. Wells. Instead Yuen Biao plays a court officer in the Ming Dynasty who is in persuit of a cereal killer played by Yuen Wah, both men highly skilled in martial arts. Yuen Wah attempts to use a mystic stone to escape into another time zone, but is attacked by Yuen Biao while trying to activate it, and both men are sent to the ice age where they are both flash frozen. In modern times ( or at least 1989 when the film was made ) scientists discover Biao and Wah's bodies and bring them back to Hong Kong for further study. Both men thaw out, and the chase resumes with Biao now pursuing Wah in modern Hong Kong. Biao finds refuge with a prostitute, played by Maggie Cheung, while Wah ends up taking over a local crime gang. Wah decides to murder a few women, then find and finish Biao off for good, after which he will locate the mystic stone again so he can terrorize another time period. Which of course was a set up for a lot of great action scenes.

I got this film a long time ago on Laserdisc, and foolishly decided not to bother upgrading it to DVD because I had a perfectly good Laserdisc which was suppose to last over 200 years. I failed to count on them discontinuing to make laserdisc players. When I finally did get around to thinking of upgrading all my laserdiscs, I discovered that all the Tai Seng DVDs were out of print and now going for $100 or more. So I have not watched this movie in years. But what I could do was buy the 2014 remake.

What a letdown. How the hell can they call something a remake when it has none of the same characters and none of the original plot. This time around Donnie Yen plays a Ming Dynasty general who is accused by his fellow generals of treason by aiding the Japanese pirates in raiding villages. But just as he is about to be arrested, the entire army is caught in an avalanche and flash frozen. In modern times ( or at least 2014, which is pretty close to now ) three frozen bodies which include Donnie and the two other generals trying to arrest him, are being transported in cryochambers in a truck. The truck crashes, and Donnie is the first to thaw out. Still woozy from the effects of being thawed out after hundreds of years, he wanders onto an overpass and falls off onto the roof of a bus where he passes out. He wakes up in a modern city, and as in the original, finds refuge with a prostitute. Only this time around the hero is the Ming Dynasty criminal being hunted when the other two generals also thaw out. They immediately join a street gang after helping them out by beating up the cops trying to arrest them. This is as close as the film gets to being anything like the original. There is also a sub plot about a government organization trying to track them down, the ones that found and put them in the cryochambers in the first place. Nothing is really explained, and the entire film was nothing more than a set up for a sequel that was never made, which included a cliffhanger where Donnie falls off a bridge. Worst of all, there is very little action. The only standout action scene, where the three men finally confront each other, takes place in the final 20 minutes. I guess this would have all made sense had there been sequels. But instead you only get the first chapter of a story with no resolution, no explanation about the secret government agency, and not even any resolution to the flashback scenes so we can find out who framed Donnie and why.

Dick Tracy's Delimma ( 1947 )
The first screen Dick Tracy was Ralph Byrd in the 1937 Republic Pictures serial Dick Tracy. This was soon followed by other serials, Dick Tracy Returns in 1938, Dick Tracy's G-Men in 1939, and Dick Tracy vs Crime Inc.[/i] in 1941, all starring Byrd. When RKO began making Dick Tracy feature films, they cast Morgan Conway as the detective. But everyone began complaining that RKO had not cast Byrd, and that he and only he could be Dick Tracy on screen. So RKO broke down and recast the role. Dick Tracy's Dilemma would be the first RKO film to feature Byrd in the lead role. There would be one other RKO move, after which the rights went to another producer who wanted to use Dick Tracy for a weekly television show. Not wanting to make the same mistake as RKO, the television producer hired Ralph Byrd to play Tracy. However, halfway through the second season Byrd died of a heart attack, and the show was cancelled. Some say that the grueling shooting schedule contributed to Byrd's ill health. Byrd nearly took Dick Tracy to the grave with him, as there would be no live action adaption of the character until the 1990 movie.

Just like the other two RKO Dick Tracy movies, this was no more than a one hour B picture. This time fur has been robbed from a warehouse and the night watchman has been killed. It is up to Tracy to figure out who masterminded the robbery, and to track down the suspected killer, an ex-con with a hook for an arm named The Claw. This is passable entertainment, but like the others is basically on the level of an hour long television crime drama. No better than an average Dragnet episode, but no worse.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2017, 10:55:16 PM by stethacantus »


Offline CJones

  • The FBI Pays Me to Surf
  • *
  • Posts: 2988
  • Liked: 326
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #17324 on: July 17, 2017, 02:23:30 PM »
Schindlers List is one of the very few movies that made me cry. The only other one I can think of off the top of my head is Grave of the Fireflies.

I have no desire to ever see either of those movies again.