Author Topic: What was the last movie you watched?  (Read 1585617 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline ScottotD

  • Not Quite Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11158
  • Liked: 1269
  • E Pluribum Anus forever
    • Facebook
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16935 on: August 07, 2016, 11:05:42 PM »
The fact the FX (dog scene especially) from The Thing still creep me out after the countless times I've seen it really drives home how great that movie is.

They are truly amazing.  The movie's really great all over, but those special effects are truly amazing and is really the go to for people when talking about great practical effects.

The stomach mouth is the only part I roll my eyes at but I know a lot of people who love that so who knows?
Scottotd on Instagram

"A thing I like that there was no chance would ever continue until recently is now continuing but it doesn't meet my exact personal specifications so fuck this"

- how I read any complaint about MST3k (or Star Wars or Ghostbusters)


Offline stethacantus

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 841
  • Liked: 95
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16936 on: August 08, 2016, 12:05:41 AM »
Hero ( 2002 )
When it was produced, Hero was the most expensive film production to ever come out of China. Unfortunately the North American distribution rights were snatched up by Miramax which predictably shelved the film with no plans for a release date. For the next two years Miramax lawyers valiantly sued everyone from Amazon on down who dared sell imports of the film on DVD, even keeping it from Chinese immigrants who would typically see the latest films from their homeland in their Chinatown theaters and video shops. Even when it was nominated by the Motion Picture Academy for Best Foreign Language Film, Miramax did not give it a general release, which doomed it's chances at winning an Oscar. Finally Quentin Tarantino stepped in and got the film released, and here is something amazing for Miramax, released uncut.

Hero was directed by Zhang Yimou, the award winning director of such critically acclaimed films as Ju Dou ( 1990 ) and Raise The Red Lantern ( 1991 ). He decided to begin directing action movies, which would later include the critically acclaimed films House of Flying Daggers ( 2004 ) and Curse of the Golden Flower ( 2006 ). Hero was his first, which explains why the action sequences are so weak. In his first action movie Zhang relies too heavily on wirework. Characters swing, fly and defy gravity so much that you can tell the wires are always there, even though they have been digitally painted out. Most obvious is during a swordfight above the surface of a lake. Certainly stars Jet Li, Maggie Cheung, Tony Leung and Donnie Yen were capable of performing excellent fight scenes without the aid of wires, as they had done in countless other movies.  More frustrating is that Zhang had staged a lot of memorable action scenes for Curse of the Golden Flower with very minimal wirework. On the positive side, the story is excellent. And the scenes look stunning. So while the action may not be impressive, everything else is.



Birdman -or- ( The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance ) ( 2014 )
Deciding to keep the Academy Award nomination thing going, I decided to move Birdman up in my cue instead of beginning the first of four TMNT films ( More on those movies next week. ). I usually reserve my Saturday evenings for whatever fantasy and comic book movies are in my cue. And for the past few years I have been gradually building up what I hope to some day be a complete library of every superhero movie, including those movies only slightly connected to the Superhero genre. Superhero films were always ignored by the Academy Awards. Sure they could get nominations for animation and the technical stuff. But the technical stuff from popcorn movies had always cleaned up at the Oscars. Rarely were they recognized in the major categories. Heath Ledger winning for playing The Joker was a rare exception, but may have been more due to his death a year earlier and this being the last chance to give the actor an Academy Award. Meanwhile, The Dark Knight ( 2008 ) which was at the top of most critics best picture lists for the year, received no best picture nomination. Nor did The Avengers ( 2012 ) four years later, even though the rules had been changed to expand the number of best film nominations from five to nine. 

It looked as if superhero films would always be blacklisted by the Academy snobs, when in 2015 a superhero film not only got a best picture nomination, but won the Oscar. Well, technically it was not a superhero film, but a film about an actor who once played a superhero. But it did show that Hollywood was warming up to the idea of superhero movies as an art form. ( It should be noted that at the same awards ceremony, Big Hero 6 won for best animated feature, another milestone, and both actors who played the Hulk in the MCU, Edward Nortan and Mark Ruffalo, were nominated in the best supporting actor category for films where they did not play CGI monsters. ) Last winter the fourth Mad Max movie surprisingly made it into the Best Picture category, so yeah, it looks like we are finally on track to getting a real superhero film nominated, provided Hollywood is still capable of making good superhero films and has not fallen into the formula rut once again. 

Birdman stars Michael Keaton as Riggan Thomson, a Hollywood actor who was one in the successful Birdman franchise in the 90s, but refused to make any more superhero films after Birdman 3. Since that time his career has taken a nose dive, and with very few film offers, has decided to take the last of his money and invest it on a Broadway play. All the time he imagines his alter ego Birdman is talking to him, trying to convince him to give up the play and return to Hollywood to do more superhero films. As the play begins to fall apart during the previews, Riggan descends more into madness. Keaton was perfect for the part. He himself had dropped out of a successful superhero franchise, Batman, only to see his career go into a slump. Then again, had he stayed on with the Batman films, he would have been in the two of the worst superhero films ever made. similarly his costar, Edward Norton also gave up a superhero franchise, bailing out as the star of The Hulk just before the character appeared in The Avengers. Another superhero alumni is Emma Stone who plays Riggan's daughter in the movie. Stone had just previously played Gwen Stacy in the Amazing Spider Man movies. And she also costarred in another arthouse movie called Paper Man ( 2009 ) were a washed up author ( Jeff Daniels ) also talks to an imaginary superhero, Captain Excellent ( played by Ryan Reynolds ).

Mexican director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, who was responsible for such other films as Babel ( 2007 ) and The Revenant ( 2015 ) attempts something experimental here, having most of the movie take place in what appears to be a single shot with the camera following characters around the theater. It's a gimmick which does not really add to the story. Fortunately the actual story is pretty good. Although I feel this movie is a bit overrated. But unlike Howard Stern and others who insists Birdman is one of the worst movies ever made, I found the movie entertaining. Just short of three stars out of a possible four. And if anything, it became a boost to Keaton's career. His portrayal of the Birdman in his delusions caught the attention of producers at Marvel Studios, who have cast him as the Vulture in next years Spider-Man: Homecoming ( 2017 ) 
 
Dancing Lady ( 1933 )
A year or two ago I bought the box set of the complete Three Stooges film shorts, followed by the Three Stooges full length feature films made in the late 50s and 60s, and eventually working my way down to a lot of movies where the Stooges made guest appearances, which would include the Rifftrax release Swing Parade ( 1946 ). Here was a film featuring the Stooges starring Joan Crawford  and Clark Gable, along with the official screen debuts of Fred Astair and Nelson Eddy, as well as the first sound film for the uncredited Eve Arden. Crawford plays Janie Barlow, a striptease dancer who wants to move up from burlesque shows to Broadway shows. She relentlessly stalks Patch Gallagher ( Gable ), the director of an upcoming musical, trying to get an audition. But Patch has already cast his show and is uninterested in seeing her. Meanwhile millionair playboy Tod Newton ( Franchot  Tone ) has been persuing Janie, trying to get her to agree to date him. When he finds out she cant get an audition, he decides to become the shows major investor, and in the process forces Patch to give Janie that audition. At first Patch has no intention of hiring Jeanie, audition or not. But apparently she is such a talented dancer ( and I say apparently because it didn't look like good dancing to me ) that Patch hires her on the spot, and within a week has her moved up to the lead. Now that she is in a musical, she no longer has time for the playboy. He gets her to agree that if the Broadway thing does not work out, that she will retire from dancing and become his wife, not knowing that he is the shows major investor. He has the production shut down, and Janie who is clueless as to why the show closed agrees to be his wife. But a drunken Patch, who by now is in love with Janie, confronts them both at a club, and spills the beans that Newton was the one who had the show shut down. Janie leaves Newton, goes back to Patch who has reopened the show with his own money, and as the lead becomes a broadway sensation. And if that is not enough of a happy ending, tells Patch after the show that she had fallen in love with him.

Basically, Dancing Lady is a formula rags-to-ritches movie from the 30s. For my money, the 1930s was the weakest decade in Hollywood history, despite the fact that 1939 is considered Hollywoods greatest year. The problem is that most of the movies from the early sound era were pot boilers. The combination of the extra production costs of sound, and the Great Depression, had the studios backing off of the ambitious productions of the 1920s. To make matters worse was the enforcement of the Hays Code, a confusing list of rules of conduct on film made in the 1920s to appease those wanting motion pictures regulated for content. Despite the Hays Code existing, studios regularly ignored them. But by the mid 30s, pressure from organized religious groups forced studios and distributors to adhere to the code, which meant everything produced in America would be heavily censored until the 1960s. So Hollywood turned to the one thing the Hays Code did not enforce, the musical. ( The Hays Code had been written in the silent era ). And besides, audiences could not get enough of musicals. Which brings us to another problem with the 1930s. Sound recording was still very poor, and would not improve until about 1939. This was the era when actors spoke funny, because they needed to speak in a specific tone in order for their voices to register on the sound equipment. But that also meant that most musicals and cartoons with singing, were unintelligible. I don't know how many times I have heard singing in a 1930s film and it sounded like a high pitched "Muur Muur Muuuur Muur Mur MMMuuuur" instead of actual lyrics. No wonder they eventually needed to add that bouncing ball and lyrics.

Dancing Lady is just passably entertaining, and most of that comes from seeing the early work of many Hollywood legends. But the reason I even watched this movie was to see The Three Stooges. This was back when it was Ted Healy and His Stooges, which originally included Shemp and another member who got so fed up with the way Healy treated them that they quit. Curly came in to replace his brother Shemp just in time for Healy to be signed by M.G.M. However, due to studio policy, each separate stooge was signed to separate contacts, and sometimes the studio would make one of the stooges take a minor role in a different film without Ted. It should also be pointed out that Ted made sure he got all the good gags, while the Stooges just ran around in his background as an unorganized mess. In this movie, while Ted Healy has a plumb part as Patch Gallagher's assistant, the other Stooges are barely on screen. In fact, Larry does not even play one of Healy's stooges, but instead is the piano player for the show. It would not be until the M.G.M. contract expired and Columbia made an offer to Moe, Larry and Curly to star as The Three Stooges without Ted Healy, and there that they were finally able to develop their act.


Sharknado: The 4th Awakens ( 2016 )
With the Olympics now putting NBC on hiatus for the next two weeks, I have more time in my schedule. Enough time to spend Sunday Night watching the latest installment from the Sharknado film series. When the first Sharknado movie was an unexpected hit, the executives at SyFy must have rounded up their script writers and said. "Fellas. I don't know how we did it. But we took a really stupid idea about sharks in a tornado and turned it into a hit film. So yes, there is going to be a sequel. I want you guys to come up with an idea that is even dumber than the last film."  And that is how it has been ever since, with SyFy out-stupiding themselves with each new film.  Basically the story in every Sharknado film is this: Ian Ziering goes to a new city, only for a tornado to form, suck up live sharks from the ocean, and then send the killer fish upon the city where Ziering is. No matter where Ziering goes, a cloud of sharks show up, even in space. This time around the sharknado starts in Las Vegas. So where do the sharks come from if a tornado starts hundreds of miles from the ocean? Conveniently, someone had built a giant 70 story shark tank called The Shark Hotel which was full of thousands of sharks before it took a direct hit from the tornado. Oh, and Ziering just happened to be visiting Las Vegas when this happened. Once the sharknado has passes, it is a race against time for Ziering to get to his home in Kansas before the Sharknado gets there first and kills his five year old going on twelve year old son. With the airports destroyed, Ziering tries to get home by train. But the Sharknado has just destroyed the Hoover Dam, and in the process has picked up thousands of boulders. It then goes on a collision course with the very train that Ziering is on. Later Ziering gets to his farm in Kansas, and guess what, the Sharknado shows up. During the movie the Sharknado destroys an oil rig turning it into an oilnado with sharks, then burst into flames turning it into a firenado with sharks, then hits an electrical plant turning it into a lightningnado with sharks, and finally takes out a nuclear power plant turning it into a nukano with sharks. Nothing seems to be able to kill these sharks. Not being tossed around in a tornado. Not being kept out of water for hours. Not the boulders, oil, fire, electricity or radiation. About the only thing that can kill them is chainsaws. Fortunately Ziering finds his fill of chainsaws, including a chainsaw store in Texas. There is nothing you really need to know more about the film, other than Tara Reid's character being turned into a bionic woman who can shoot laser beams and shoot jets out of her feet that allows her to fly.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2016, 06:25:20 AM by stethacantus »


Offline Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 28130
  • Liked: 5900
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16937 on: August 08, 2016, 07:51:55 AM »

Sharknado: The 4th Awakens ( 2016 )
With the Olympics now putting NBC on hiatus for the next two weeks, I have more time in my schedule. Enough time to spend Sunday Night watching the latest installment from the Sharknado film series. When the first Sharknado movie was an unexpected hit, the executives at SyFy must have rounded up their script writers and said. "Fellas. I don't know how we did it. But we took a really stupid idea about sharks in a tornado and turned it into a hit film. So yes, there is going to be a sequel. I want you guys to come up with an idea that is even dumber than the last film."  And that is how it has been ever since, with SyFy out-stupiding themselves with each new film.  Basically the story in every Sharknado film is this: Ian Ziering goes to a new city, only for a tornado to form, suck up live sharks from the ocean, and then send the killer fish upon the city where Ziering is. No matter where Ziering goes, a cloud of sharks show up, even in space. This time around the sharknado starts in Las Vegas. So where do the sharks come from if a tornado starts hundreds of miles from the ocean? Conveniently, someone had built a giant 70 story shark tank called The Shark Hotel which was full of thousands of sharks before it took a direct hit from the tornado. Oh, and Ziering just happened to be visiting Las Vegas when this happened. Once the sharknado has passes, it is a race against time for Ziering to get to his home in Kansas before the Sharknado gets there first and kills his five year old going on twelve year old son. With the airports destroyed, Ziering tries to get home by train. But the Sharknado has just destroyed the Hoover Dam, and in the process has picked up thousands of boulders. It then goes on a collision course with the very train that Ziering is on. Later Ziering gets to his farm in Kansas, and guess what, the Sharknado shows up. During the movie the Sharknado destroys an oil rig turning it into an oilnado with sharks, then burst into flames turning it into a firenado with sharks, then hits an electrical plant turning it into a lightningnado with sharks, and finally takes out a nuclear power plant turning it into a nukano with sharks. Nothing seems to be able to kill these sharks. Not being tossed around in a tornado. Not being kept out of water for hours. Not the boulders, oil, fire, electricity or radiation. About the only thing that can kill them is chainsaws. Fortunately Ziering finds his fill of chainsaws, including a chainsaw store in Texas. There is nothing you really need to know more about the film, other than Tara Reid's character being turned into a bionic woman who can shoot laser beams and shoot jets out of her feet that allows her to fly.
So...was it any fun? By this point we know it's silly, and all the different types of nados you describe could be kind of cool. But how well was it handled in this one?
Personally, the novelty of the premise made the first one fun. But after that, it's Ziering that really tanks these movies for me. He just cannot shoulder the lead role in a movie. He has the charisma of a dishrag.



Offline Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26231
  • Liked: 5185
  • Mr. Robot
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16938 on: August 08, 2016, 07:56:07 AM »

Sharknado: The 4th Awakens ( 2016 )
With the Olympics now putting NBC on hiatus for the next two weeks, I have more time in my schedule. Enough time to spend Sunday Night watching the latest installment from the Sharknado film series. When the first Sharknado movie was an unexpected hit, the executives at SyFy must have rounded up their script writers and said. "Fellas. I don't know how we did it. But we took a really stupid idea about sharks in a tornado and turned it into a hit film. So yes, there is going to be a sequel. I want you guys to come up with an idea that is even dumber than the last film."  And that is how it has been ever since, with SyFy out-stupiding themselves with each new film.  Basically the story in every Sharknado film is this: Ian Ziering goes to a new city, only for a tornado to form, suck up live sharks from the ocean, and then send the killer fish upon the city where Ziering is. No matter where Ziering goes, a cloud of sharks show up, even in space. This time around the sharknado starts in Las Vegas. So where do the sharks come from if a tornado starts hundreds of miles from the ocean? Conveniently, someone had built a giant 70 story shark tank called The Shark Hotel which was full of thousands of sharks before it took a direct hit from the tornado. Oh, and Ziering just happened to be visiting Las Vegas when this happened. Once the sharknado has passes, it is a race against time for Ziering to get to his home in Kansas before the Sharknado gets there first and kills his five year old going on twelve year old son. With the airports destroyed, Ziering tries to get home by train. But the Sharknado has just destroyed the Hoover Dam, and in the process has picked up thousands of boulders. It then goes on a collision course with the very train that Ziering is on. Later Ziering gets to his farm in Kansas, and guess what, the Sharknado shows up. During the movie the Sharknado destroys an oil rig turning it into an oilnado with sharks, then burst into flames turning it into a firenado with sharks, then hits an electrical plant turning it into a lightningnado with sharks, and finally takes out a nuclear power plant turning it into a nukano with sharks. Nothing seems to be able to kill these sharks. Not being tossed around in a tornado. Not being kept out of water for hours. Not the boulders, oil, fire, electricity or radiation. About the only thing that can kill them is chainsaws. Fortunately Ziering finds his fill of chainsaws, including a chainsaw store in Texas. There is nothing you really need to know more about the film, other than Tara Reid's character being turned into a bionic woman who can shoot laser beams and shoot jets out of her feet that allows her to fly.
So...was it any fun? By this point we know it's silly, and all the different types of nados you describe could be kind of cool. But how well was it handled in this one?
Personally, the novelty of the premise made the first one fun. But after that, it's Ziering that really tanks these movies for me. He just cannot shoulder the lead role in a movie. He has the charisma of a dishrag.

Man, DG really selling dishrags short.


Offline Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 28130
  • Liked: 5900
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16939 on: August 08, 2016, 08:01:42 AM »

Sharknado: The 4th Awakens ( 2016 )
With the Olympics now putting NBC on hiatus for the next two weeks, I have more time in my schedule. Enough time to spend Sunday Night watching the latest installment from the Sharknado film series. When the first Sharknado movie was an unexpected hit, the executives at SyFy must have rounded up their script writers and said. "Fellas. I don't know how we did it. But we took a really stupid idea about sharks in a tornado and turned it into a hit film. So yes, there is going to be a sequel. I want you guys to come up with an idea that is even dumber than the last film."  And that is how it has been ever since, with SyFy out-stupiding themselves with each new film.  Basically the story in every Sharknado film is this: Ian Ziering goes to a new city, only for a tornado to form, suck up live sharks from the ocean, and then send the killer fish upon the city where Ziering is. No matter where Ziering goes, a cloud of sharks show up, even in space. This time around the sharknado starts in Las Vegas. So where do the sharks come from if a tornado starts hundreds of miles from the ocean? Conveniently, someone had built a giant 70 story shark tank called The Shark Hotel which was full of thousands of sharks before it took a direct hit from the tornado. Oh, and Ziering just happened to be visiting Las Vegas when this happened. Once the sharknado has passes, it is a race against time for Ziering to get to his home in Kansas before the Sharknado gets there first and kills his five year old going on twelve year old son. With the airports destroyed, Ziering tries to get home by train. But the Sharknado has just destroyed the Hoover Dam, and in the process has picked up thousands of boulders. It then goes on a collision course with the very train that Ziering is on. Later Ziering gets to his farm in Kansas, and guess what, the Sharknado shows up. During the movie the Sharknado destroys an oil rig turning it into an oilnado with sharks, then burst into flames turning it into a firenado with sharks, then hits an electrical plant turning it into a lightningnado with sharks, and finally takes out a nuclear power plant turning it into a nukano with sharks. Nothing seems to be able to kill these sharks. Not being tossed around in a tornado. Not being kept out of water for hours. Not the boulders, oil, fire, electricity or radiation. About the only thing that can kill them is chainsaws. Fortunately Ziering finds his fill of chainsaws, including a chainsaw store in Texas. There is nothing you really need to know more about the film, other than Tara Reid's character being turned into a bionic woman who can shoot laser beams and shoot jets out of her feet that allows her to fly.
So...was it any fun? By this point we know it's silly, and all the different types of nados you describe could be kind of cool. But how well was it handled in this one?
Personally, the novelty of the premise made the first one fun. But after that, it's Ziering that really tanks these movies for me. He just cannot shoulder the lead role in a movie. He has the charisma of a dishrag.

Man, DG really selling dishrags short.
Well, not one of those fancy dishrags. Ian Ziering can't compete with those.



Offline stethacantus

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 841
  • Liked: 95
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16940 on: August 08, 2016, 11:02:12 PM »
So...was it any fun?
That all depends on one's definition of "fun".  But something did happen near the end of the movie, just after the Sharknado was destroyed and the stray sharks were still attacking Ziering. ( You know, just before the predictable ending where cast members chainsaw their way out of shark stomachs. ) Lets just say the final thing eaten is so unexpected it actually made me laugh. On the other hand, every one of the jokes that referenced The Wizard of Oz ( and there were a lot of them ) failed.

By this point we know it's silly, and all the different types of nados you describe could be kind of cool. But how well was it handled in this one?

I don't think they have ever handled any of these movies well. Special effects are still bargain basement CGI. Action scenes which had a lot of potential are poorly staged. The acting is all over the place. A character from a Steven King book is for no good reason introduced, and for no good reason abandoned. The script is terrible. But that was the same with all the other Sharknado movies. BTW, two other tornadoes form, one over  San Francisco that spits out huge chunks of ice, andother over a volcano that becomes a lavanado. Neither has sharks and are just there as time killers.

Like most of the SyFy movies, they have premises and casts that are so dumb you have to watch. But you never get any quality.


Offline RoninFox

  • Gryffindork
  • ******
  • Posts: 14021
  • Liked: 2386
    • Ronin Fox Trax
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16941 on: August 09, 2016, 07:11:00 AM »
Caught Suicide Squad yesterday. Overall I enjoyed it. I see some of the flaws, and there are signs that significant cuts and edits were made to try and change its tone, but I thought it was carried well by the cast. Leto's Joker grew on me more than I thought it would, Margot Robbie was a great choice for Harley Quinn, Will Smith made me actually give a shit about Deadshot, Viola Davis was a pitch-perfect Amada Waller. I feel like the other characters could have stepped up a little more, would have been nice to see more out of Katana and Croc especially, but no one seemed out of place or miscast to me. Unlike with Batman V Superman, I'm actually looking forward to a potential extended cut.
RoninFoxTrax Presents Rocky

gum.co/RFTrocky


Offline RoninFox

  • Gryffindork
  • ******
  • Posts: 14021
  • Liked: 2386
    • Ronin Fox Trax
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16942 on: August 10, 2016, 07:19:26 AM »
A day after what I considered a decent movie with Batman and Joker in it that could have been better, I ended up watching a really good movie with Batman and Joker. Got The Killing Joke on Blu Ray and finally got a chance to see it. Really sorry that I missed it's theatrical showings. Mark Hamil gets his big wish to give some of the best Joker speaches in comics thanks to this adaptation and he kills it, always great to hear Kevin Conroy as Batman again, and Tara Strong as Barbara Gordon.

I was surprised just how much of the movie was new material, though it makes perfect sense. The original graphic novel is fairly short, so we wind up with an extended Batgirl sequence that with some tweaking would have stood out well on its own, but also really helps compliment the darkness of Barbara's part in the classic story.

If I had any wish to improve this movie, it would be to have an art style closer to the original, but that level of detail would probably delay this movie by several years, so I'm happy with what I got.
RoninFoxTrax Presents Rocky

gum.co/RFTrocky


Offline Russoguru

  • Mayor of Nilbog
  • *****
  • Posts: 3810
  • Liked: 581
  • "The name's Apple, Tim Apple"
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16943 on: August 11, 2016, 10:25:12 PM »
The Great Escape - The casting is one of the most impressive aspects of this movie: Steve Mcqueen, James Garner, James Coburn, Richard Attenborough, David McCallum, Charles Bronson, Donald Pleasance. Damn, that's a lot of great acting talent! It's great to see all these wonderful actors working together as these POW's trying to escape from the clutches of the Nazis. All the little interactions, the drama, it all builds up very well. My only complaint is that the actual great escape doesn't happen until nearly two hours into the film. This is not a weakness though, because when we finally get to this point, it's even more thrilling because these heroes are doing all they can to stifle the progress of the Nazi war machine. The ending is tinged with much sadness, but there is hope also. I highly recommend this wonderful classic.


Offline stethacantus

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 841
  • Liked: 95
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16944 on: August 14, 2016, 04:16:12 PM »
1911 ( 2011 )
Somehow Jackie Chan was able to determine that he was about to make his 100th movie. I am not sure exactly what he was counting. Was he counting uncredited bit parts like Enter the Dragon? How about the films he did as a kid that he was edited out of. Or incomplete movies where the footage was sold to other studios and completed with a body double? How about that one unsanctioned Drunken Master sequel that edited in four minutes of Chan footage from other movies? Or the ones he was stunt coordinator on? Or only acted as a producer? The exact Jackie Chan filmography has been in debate on martial arts forums for decades. Even Chan had once said he was unsure of all the movies he had bit parts in at the beginning of his career.

Never the less, Jackie Chan decided that he was about to make his 100th movie. And to celebrate decided he wanted to direct a historic epic. Keeping the 100 theme, the film takes place 100 years ago during the revolution that forced the dowager empress to abdicate the thrown ending thousands of years of empirical rule. Chan does not even play the lead character, but instead just one of the hundreds of characters in the movie. There was an effort here to put every single historical person involved in the revolution in the movie, each which is identified with his own screen credit on first appearance, even the ones that show up for just one line. Most historical films omit or combine historic characters in order to make the movie more dramatic. And the full dramatic impact is what is missing from this movie. But it still works. For what little screen time he has, Chan delivers a great dramatic performance. But be warned. There is none of his signature humor here. Nor any of his signature action.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles  ( 1990 )
I am currently collecting movies based on comic books and superheroes. Those movies I watch on Saturday nights. I am also currently collecting martial arts movies which I watch Saturday afternoon. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles counts as both genres. So when to watch? Afternoon or evening? Because we are talking about actors in Muppet costumes, I  chose night time. Which is how I  ended up watching a Jackie Chan movie in the afternoon that turned out not to be a martial arts film. The ironic thing was that the actors in the costumes were able to perform a lot of flawless martial arts moves. Something the other American made martial arts films of this period were incapable of doing.

I would not call this a good review for the film. The turtles are suppose to be funny, and they aren't. The film makers didn't learn the lesson of Howard the Duck and made a movie where humans in costumes are suppose to look like animals, but obviously don't. The actors playing the human characters in this movie make the actors from the SyFy movies look like master thespians. This is a huge step down from the cartoon series. Yet, it is just barely entertaining enough to kill 90 minutes.

Riding High ( 1950 )
This may sound like the latest Seth Rogen comedy, but it is really a Frank Capra directed Bing Crosby musical about a race horse I only bought because it had an uncredited cameo from Oliver Hardy. It is a pleasant enough film, but very predictable.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2016, 04:22:15 PM by stethacantus »


Offline PsychoGoatee

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1038
  • Liked: 140
  • We are the road crew!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16945 on: August 18, 2016, 01:01:08 PM »
Just for the record, I consider that Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles movie a masterpiece, and I was lucky I got to see in a theater last summer too... with pizza!


Offline Pak-Man

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 17308
  • Liked: 3212
  • Insert $0.25 to Play!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16946 on: August 18, 2016, 11:35:36 PM »
Well I wouldn't go so far as to call it a masterpiece, but it's a nostalgic favorite of mine.

I've never considered ordering Pizza for a Ninja Turtles movie, but there are many theaters where it's possible. I might have to take in the new one a second time and order a slice just to go for the 4D experience. :^)


Offline Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 28130
  • Liked: 5900
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16947 on: August 21, 2016, 02:48:15 PM »
Sausage Party - It was funny. A bit too pointlessly raunchy for it's own good, but there were enough jokes that I liked for me to give a recommendation.

Kubo and the Two Strings - A good movie. A bit too odd for me, since it was so steeped in Japanese mythology, but I don't fault the movie for that. Absolutely STUNNING visuals, though!
The only thing I didn't care for was
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Also, oddly enough,
Spoiler (click to show/hide)



Offline stethacantus

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 841
  • Liked: 95
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16948 on: August 21, 2016, 10:41:39 PM »
Let The Bullets Fly ( 2012 )
A bit disappointing. Chow Yun Fat was renowned for his heroic bloodshed movies, the ones with a lot of shootouts. The last two were made in America, The Replacement Killers ( 1998 ) and The Corruptor ( 1999 ), after which his films were historic dramas, martial arts and comedies. With the title Let The Bullets Fly, it sounded like once again we would see Chow pick up a gun and go into battle with it. But he barely fires a gun at all in this movie, once while shooting a dead corpse, the other firing a gun into the air with a bullet he was meant to use on himself. In fact, there is very little gunplay in this movie, despite two criminal gangs facing off against each other for most of the film. The plot has a bandit in the 1920s accidentally killing a Governor during a train holdup. He finds out the governor was on his way to Goose Town to take over his new post, and decides to use the governor's credentials and go to Goose Town himself. His initial plans were to impersonate the new governor, collect the taxes then leave town with them. But he discovers that Goose Town is controlled by a gangster ( Chow Yun Fat ). The rest of the movie has the bandit and the gangster vying for cotroll of the town, each trying to outsmart each other with schemes while both trying to avoid a gang war. And this movie was suppose to be a comedy. I didn't laugh at anything, but then again, I rarely find Chinese comedies funny. And yet, this movie has the look and feel of a Spaghetti Western. And on that level, the movie works. In fact, I would rank it up there with some of the best Spaghetti Westerns.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: Secret of the Ooze ( 1991 )
Well, here is the second one. And released less than a year after the first one. You can tell that things are not working well when the original actress who played April O'Neil was replaced with a different equally bad actress. But at least this time they had a couple of actors I recognized in the cast. David Warner as the scientist who invented the Ooze that transformed the Turtles and Splinter the Rat into intelligent humanoids, and Vanilla Ice as some douchebag white rapper on a club stage. Both appeared to be there just to pick up a quick paycheck. Like the last movie, there was some impressive martial arts fights for actors stuck in turtle costumes, but everything else was a drawn out costume show. And once again, just barely entertaining enough for it's 90 minute running time.

4 For Texas ( 1963 )
It turns out that this week had a theme. Comedies that were not funny. I did not think Let The Bullets Fly worked as a comedy. Certainly the second Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle movie did not make me laugh. And nothing made me laugh in 4 For Texas. In fact, the comedy highlight was a short guest appearance from The Three Stooges, the older version of the trio with Curly Joe. Here they repeat their Point Right! routine for the umpteenth time. This was one of the Rat Pack movies, only with just Frank and Dean. Frank Sinatra plays a gunslinger in the old west, a sort of enforcer for hire working for corrupt banker Victor Buono. Frank is returning to Galveston with $100,000 on a stagecoach when it is attacked by a gang of bandits lead by Charles Bronson. Buono secretly hired Bronson to kill Sinatra and take his money. Also on the stage is Dean Martin, a wanted con man on his way home. While Bronson and his men are driven off, everyone else on the stage is killed, leaving just Frank and Dean to fight over the money. After each gets the drop on the other, it is eventually Dean who rides away with the loot, leaving Frank in the desert to walk back to town. It turns out that Frank was bringing the money to town to invest in a riverboat casino. Dean finds out about it, and decides to invest in the riverboat himself with the stolen money. Anita Ekberg  and Ursula Andress  are also in the movie, basically as Frank and Dean's arm candy, respectively. Of course we all know Frank and Dean will end up being friends by the last reel, that Bronson will be killed off, and Buono will get his comeuppance. But even though the story is predictable and the comedy falls flat, the movie is still pretty entertaining to watch. And you get the bonus of seeing a naked Ursula Andress. Or at least, a painting of a nude Ursula which I am surprised they allowed in a 1963 movie. And if that is not good enough for you, another scene has Ursula in a sheer nightgown, at one point standing in a doorway where it is backlit.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2016, 10:46:30 PM by stethacantus »


Offline WhyDontTheyLook

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1287
  • Liked: 112
  • Tell me.
    • GaryWOlson.com
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16949 on: August 23, 2016, 02:07:54 PM »
A couple days ago I watched Radioactive Dreams, the second film directed by Albert Pyun (who also directed The Sword and the Sorcerer and Alien from L.A., as well as the 1990 Captain America movie).  So you know already this was by no stretch a "good" film... but as "bad" films go, it was pretty damn cool.  It begins with an absurdist premise (two kids protected from nuclear armageddon in a bomb shelter who leave it 20 years later to search for their fathers in the post-apocalypic wasteland society, their worldviews heavily influenced by noir novels), and throws in giant rats, mutants, cannibals, tunnel snakes, and George Kennedy along the way to the shoot-out finale.  Plus it has a really good new wave soundtrack (I mean really good... Sue Saad's "Guilty Pleasures" turns a fight sequence into a knockout about 2/3rds of the way in).

It was never released on DVD or Blu-Ray (though hopefully it'll show up now that Lionsgate is starting to release Vestron Video titles), though some VHS copies are still floating around.  I watched it on YouTube, though if it does get a blu-ray release, I might just plunk down for it.
"You never know, in a tight jam a nuclear missile just might come in handy."