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Author Topic: What was the last movie you watched?  (Read 1526236 times)

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Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16890 on: July 16, 2016, 07:36:59 PM »
Watched Double Indemnity last night.  I knew it was going to be good, but I was surprised how fun it was.  Aside from it just being really good, I'm a sucker for stories about a process, especially when it comes to crime.  Edward G. Robinson is a delight, too.


Offline PsychoGoatee

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16891 on: July 16, 2016, 10:34:53 PM »
I love Double Indemnity, gotta love noir! Murder My Sweet is another one of my film noir favs too.

Just saw Snowpiercer, good stuff.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16892 on: July 16, 2016, 11:05:48 PM »
I saw Murder My Sweet for the first time recently and it is indeed great.


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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16893 on: July 17, 2016, 10:33:59 AM »
Well, I wouldn't be able to see it without him, since I'm lacking in apparent transportation.

Are you so far from a theater a cab, Uber or public transportation is not an option?

Would he go for the idea of going to separate movies once at the multiplex?
I don't have the cash to see it, plus Uber.


Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16894 on: July 17, 2016, 03:24:29 PM »
Well, I wouldn't be able to see it without him, since I'm lacking in apparent transportation.

Are you so far from a theater a cab, Uber or public transportation is not an option?

Would he go for the idea of going to separate movies once at the multiplex?
I don't have the cash to see it, plus Uber.

What about the idea of seeing two different movies? If you're not against seeing a movie on your own.
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Offline Darth Geek

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16895 on: July 17, 2016, 05:37:54 PM »
GHOSTBUSTERS  (2016) - It was all right. Pale imitation of the original. But a decent amount of the jokes worked, and I liked the characters.



Offline stethacantus

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16896 on: July 17, 2016, 10:15:22 PM »
The Karate Kid ( 2010 )
A spoiled Hollywood power couple puts their own kid in a remake of a classic 80s film. Oh wait, that's not the plot. A boy and his widowed mother move to China. The boy gets beaten up a lot by a bully that knows martial arts. The building maintenance man takes pity on the boy and teaches him martial arts. The boy enters a Kung Fu tournament where he fights and defeats the bully. Pretty much the same plot as the original Karate Kid with one major difference. There is no Karate in this film. It should have been called the Wushu Kid, or even the Kung Fu Kid. Calling it The Karate Kid this time around makes no sense at all. ( but to be fair, there was very little actual Karate in the original films. )

It had been 16 years since the last film in the Karate Kid franchise. Columbia considered the franchise dead after the failure of The Next Karate Kid ( 1994 ). The death of Pat Morita in 2005 seemed to be the final nail in the franchises coffin. That was until two years later when the Smith's approached producer Jerry Weintraub with the idea of remaking the movie as a starring vehicle for their son Jaden. The couple was powerful enough to get Columbia to agree to revive the franchise. I am guessing the studio had hoped that Jaden would be a clone of his father, because the script for Karate Kid seemes to have been written for Will with they typical one liners and gags his character had in films like Men in Black. But Jaden is no Will Smith. He is also no Ralph Macchio. He simply has no business being on the screen. There were thousands of actors his own age who were much more talented. Both Jada Pinkett Smith and Will Smith honed their skills via years of performing live on stage and making the tough climb up through the ranks of showbusiness.  Neither Jaden nor his sister Willow had any of this experience. They were both simply put in front of a camera or stuck in a recording studio and both told they were talented. And for a while there the media bough into this, playing Willow's music as if it was the latest Beyonce single,l and nominating both for multiple MTV, BET, Kids Choice and other awards. Eventually reality caught up with the Smith clan. The only award Jaden was nominated for in the past five years was two Golden Raspberry Awards which he won. This is not to say that neither Jaden nor Willow have the ability to become great artists. But it is going to be a craft they learn, not inherit.

Aside from all that, Karate Kid is actually a very good movie. A two and a half hour film that does not feel like you have been stuck there for two and a half hours. I should know, because in the past few months there have been 90 minute films I watched that had me checking the clock around the 70 minute mark. The entire younger cast may not be charismatic, but the movie pulls them through. Jackie Chan as the remakes version of Miyagi, this time called Mr. Han, is not entirely wasted. While the movie only gives him the opportunity to fight once ( and with children, so he has to pull his punches ), it does allow him to give one of the most powerful performances of his career.( BTW, a second fight scene exists for the alternate Asian release of the film, where Han fights Master Li, the evil martail arts teacher after his student looses the tournament. ).

The entire cast had been signed to do a sequel. However, a sequel has yet to be announced. Last year franchise producer Jerry Weintraub died, his last movie being this years new Tarzan film. Jaden himself is now too old to play a kid again. Chan himself announced in 2012 that he would be retiring from films, although has made many movies since that announcement. But for Chan, the clock is ticking. So basically, this is most likely the end of the Karate Kid franchise. Which means that next week I can go on to something different. ( I have a couple of Samo Hung movies in cue. )


Man of Steel ( 2013 )
This reboot of the Superman film franchise was to mark the beginning of a new DC Cinematic Universe that is currently being fast tracked to a JLA movie. I always wondered why Warner Bros. felt they needed to follow Marvel Studio's game plan. The DC superheroes are so iconic that they do not need origin films to set them up. I would have begun with a JLA movie, and if it was a success, moved on to the individual solo films. Instead DC went with Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice which did untold damage to the pending cinematic universe.

There is nothing in this movie important enough to reintroduce the most famous character in the world. The relationship between Lois and Clark has evolved in several films and television series to the point where Lois knows Clark is Superman long before he joins her at the Daily Planet. But that change in the canon already took place in Smallville. About the only thing new that Goyer adds to the Superman canon is the Codex, but it is doubtful it will play a role in any future Superman films. So basically the story here is that Superman is introduced to the world, and everyone accepts him as Earth's hero, even though he pretty much destroyed both Smallville and Metropolis battling Zod. Basically what Zack Snyder has delivered is another CGI heavy film. While Krypton looks fantastic, it is full of way too many creatures and aircraft that you can barely keep track of what is going on in the first 20 minutes of the film. I can't help but think they could have told the same story a lot better with a lot less effects to distract us.

The CGI show does not end there. Superman can't do a battle with Zod and his forces without having every building in the area smashed or blown up. In the old Christopher Reeves days, when Superman saw that a few humans were in danger of getting hurt during his battle with Zod, he lured him away from the city and to the arctic where the battle could be carried on without any more bystanders being injured. This Superman could not care less, and would throw a freight train right through an office building just to hit an enemy. Which does not explain why in the final battle, he worries when Zod attempts to melt a couple of people with his heat vision. He didn't seem to worry about the people in the same train station when he punched Zod through the roof at super speed, causing much of the roof to collapse on the crowds below.  In one instance Superman goes to all the trouble to save a single soldier who has fallen from a helicopter, but does not even bother to save the rest of the crew as the same helicopter plummets to the ground. Basically this is a very intelligent Superman film that turns very dumb on a dime in order to set up more CGI destruction. ( BTW, our own armed forces are not that much better in this movie when it comes to civilian casualties. )

Despite all of that, I think this is the best Superman film ever made. And it has none of the comedy that every past movie felt they needed to have. And it is the only Superman movie without Lex Luthor.

My Little Chickadee ( 1940 )
Believe it or not, Mae West and W.C. Fields only costarred together in one movie. I had always assumed they teamed up in a number of movies. Their screen characters seemed born to be together. The perfect match. And yet, while both Fields and West were under contract at Paramount, the studio never though to pair them together. It was not until Fields began working  at Universal that they made their first film together. One of the reasons they never worked together, they did not like each other. Apparently costar Dick Foran picked up on their rivalry and began turning the actors against each other. He told West that Fields had rewritten a scene so that he had the best lines, and then when West retaliated by rewriting another scene, Foran promptly reported it to Fields. Production would shut down for days as both actors rewrote the scenes they were about to film. This benefited Foran who was being paid by the day, and earned more money the longer production was delayed. Both Fields and West vowed not to work together again. But that vow did not matter much. Fields would be dead six years later. He would only star in two more movies, an then only cameos in the films that followed. May West would make only one more movie before retiring from the film business.

May West got her start on the stage, eventually writing and performing in her own plays. It was her 1926 play Sex that got her national attention when she and her entire cast were arrested and prosecuted on profanity charges where she was sentenced to eight days in prison. West followed Sex up with the pro-homosexual play The Drag which New York City officials succeeded in blocking from being performed within city limits. West continued writing controversial plays as city officials eventually laid off on the censorship. Diamond Lil was the first play not to be shut down, and it became a huge Broadway hit. West was in her 40s when Paramount signed her. After casting her in a supporting role in the drama Night After Night ( 1932 ), the studio produced a screen adaption of Diamond Lil called She Done Him Wrong ( 1933 ) with Cary Grant, which was the first time West used her catch phrase "Why don't you come up and see me some time?" ( although the original version of this line was "Why don't you come up some time and see me?" and changed in the subsequent films because it was o often misquoted in cartoons and comedy shorts. West continued making films for Paramount, but insisted that she write the scripts to her own films. However, the enforcement of the Hays Code lead to more and more censorship on her films. When her contract with Paramount was up in 1937, West had enough and gave up motion pictures for good. She was lured back to Hollywood by Universal for the Fields film My Little Chickadee with a huge paycheck, the promise that she would be the sole screen writer ( although Fields eventually got to write his own material and got co-screen credit ), and would be billed above Fields as the film's star. She was lured back to Hollywood one more time for the movie, the Columbia Pictures musical The Heat Is On ( 1943 ). But after that film was heavily censored, the 49 year old actress had enough and returned to Broadway for good. She continued to turn down film offers until the 1970s when mainstream movies were no longer censored. At the age of 77 she accepted a costarring role in Myra Breckinridge ( 1970 ) with Raquel Welch and Farrah Fawcett. In 1976 Crown International Pictures, the low budget studio and distributor responsible for The Beast of Yucca Flats ( 1961 ), Catalina Caper ( 1967 ), The Hellcats ( 1967 ), Wild Rebels ( 1967 ), and Sidehackers ( 1969 ), as well as a movie MST3K inexplicably missed, They Saved Hitler's Brain ( 1963 ) convinced an 84 year old Mae West to do a film version of her play Sex, eventually released as Sextette ( 1978 ) along with an all star cast that included Ringo Starr and Tony Curtis. This would be her final film.  It has never been riffed by anyone, which I am guessing is due to everyone feeling sorry the actress was lured into making the film at such an advanced age.

Which brings us back to the business of reviewing My Little Chickadee, a movie with a title based on Field's most famous catch phrase, but was in fact a starring movie for West. She plays a vamp  in the old west named Flower Belle Lee who is having an affair with a notorious bandit who wears a mask. The film has you guessing who the masked man is, the crooked saloon owner, or the mild mannered reporter who runs the towns only newspaper. The town gossip, Mrs Gideon ( Margaret Hamilton ) has spotted the bandit leaving Flower's room. Soon she is chased out of town, with Gideon following her to make sure the next town she goes to knows exactly what kind of woman she is. Looking to redeem her reputation, she marries a traveling huckster named Cuthbert J. Twillie ( Fields ) after she notices he has a bag full of ten dollar bills. ( although, that too turns out not to be what it seems. ) upon arriving in the new town, Twillie finds himself appointed the new sheriff, not realizing that the past dozen sheriffs have all met untimely deaths.

For a Fields film, this movie had an unusual amount of story. Take both comedians out of the film along with the lines they wrote for themselves, and you would still have a decent western. But what we were here for was the comedy, and with both Mae West and WC Fields in the same movie, expecting the best. But while Fields does have some very funny material, including him cheating at a "Gentleman's Card Game" and a funny line about burying his wife, it is apparent the studio would not allow him to overshadow West. In fact, some claim that Fields walked off the set before filming was completed when the studio refused to allow him to write any more of his scenes, and the rest of the movie was completed with a double ( which I did not notice. ) With the Hays Code in full effect, West was limited in the material she could write for herself. So basically not the best effort for both comedians. But still worth watching for the historic team up, and worth a few well deserved laughs.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2016, 10:18:53 PM by stethacantus »


Offline Kete

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16897 on: July 22, 2016, 05:16:30 AM »
Watched Double Indemnity last night.  I knew it was going to be good, but I was surprised how fun it was.  Aside from it just being really good, I'm a sucker for stories about a process, especially when it comes to crime.  Edward G. Robinson is a delight, too.

Great movie, but I can't watch it without thinking about Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid... which is also a great movie.


Offline Darth Geek

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16898 on: July 23, 2016, 03:44:15 PM »
I got about 45 minutes into Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (1990) and turned it off. I only got a few laughs out of it, mostly at the anacronistic modern stuff out of nowhere, like his hamburger. I liked the first part better, before they got transported into Hamlet, mostly because they were actually talking English and I could understand everything. But then when in the play, half the time characters were talking in Shakespear speak, that I hate. I don't understand the point of the two different English styles, when they are originally from the (I think) same time period.
It's a shame, I love the two leads, Time Roth and Gary Oldman. And they were a lot of fun to watch interact.



Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16899 on: July 24, 2016, 12:55:10 AM »
I was feeling sick and tired and was in a bad mood.  Luckily, I watched Psycho and felt a lot better.  Is that weird?


Offline stethacantus

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16900 on: July 24, 2016, 10:04:35 PM »
SPL: Sha Po Lang ( a.k.a. Kill Zone )( 2005 )

After weeks of watching American made martail arts movies, I am finally back to watching a proper Asian martial arts film. Okay, so maybe Kill Zone saves most of the martial arts for the third act, and the first two acts is mostly a police drama. But once the characters get to fighting, the choreography is spectacular. Unlike the American productions where they did as little choreography as they could get away with, and even a classic like the original Karate Kid had very few actual kicks and punches. In contrast, Kill Zone has that now classic allyway fight scene between a knife wielding Wu Jing and a stick wielding Donnie Yen, just a prelude to another great climatic fight scene between Yen and Sammo Hung who plays the movie's villain. My only real complaint is the ending of the movie. Lets put it in a way where I won't spoil it. But after the climatic fight, something happens that anyone can see coming, which leads to something you didn't see coming, which while that second thing is happening you can see the next thing coming, which does happen, and you think "Oh how convenient that those characters would be positioned right in that spot". This is follwed by a coda on the beach which is also a bit too harsh and unnecessary. I guess director Wilson Yip wanted to elevate the movie above just a standard formula police drama by having the movie end miserably for every character, both the ones killed and the ones that survived.




Son of the Mask ( 2005 )

In my quest to build a complete superhero/comic book movie library, mostly thanks to a lot of these films now being sold for a dollar on Ebay and Amazon, it is inevitable that many if not most of these films will be stinkers. In fairness, there have been some comic book movies I have seen with bad reputations that turned out to be not  that bad, mildly entertaining, or even a fantastic bit of entertainment that did not deserve it's reputation. I had hoped that Son of the Mask would fall somewhere in that category. In the annals of historically bad comic book movies, So of the Mask has been ranked down there with Howard the Duck and Batman & Robin as the worst of the worst. On top of that, the movie that had spawned it, The Mask ( 1994 ), is considered one of the best comic book movies from the 90s with a lot of positive reviews, and I did not like it that much. And here was it's sequel, which those who loved the first movie said was terrible.

In the 1990s New Line Cinema wanted to have their own Superhero movie franchise. They had a choice. Howard Stern was in pre-production on a Fartman movie while producer Bob Engleman had just bought the right to The Mask, a comic book published by the then outsider comic book company Dark Horse. The Mask gave those who wore it magical powers, but also turned them insane, and often into a villain rather than a hero. But despite how dark the comic book could get, it was actually perfect for a franchise. In the comic book, The Mask could be worn by anyone, allowing it to move from person to person with no need for any permanent characters. That meant that New Line could do sequel after sequel without needing to bring back the same cast. The Fartman movie deal fell apart when Stern refused to sign away his rights to the merchandising, and New Line went to Plan B, the lower profiled Mask franchise. But they lucked out by casting Jim Carrey just before Ace Ventura: Pet Detective ( 1994 ) made him a superstar, and Cameron Diaz in her first movie role. But since both actors were relatively unknown, neither was offered a multi movie deal, and therefore were not obligated to appear in any sequels. A big mistake on New Line's part, especially when they insisted they would not proceed with the sequel until they got both actors to agree to return. And by that time both were huge movie stars who had no interest in making a sequel. Inevitably New Line dropped idea of a Mask franchise and instead went with the successful Blade franchise.

At some point someone at New Line must have realized they still owned the rights to make at least one more Mask movie, and thought "Hell, why not?" It was not as if New Line was interested in turning The Mask into a franchise any more, because this movie was written to end the story of The Mask. I probably should warn you about spoilers, but really, the movie is bad enough that you will not care if the plot has been spoiled. And the part about Odin sending Loki to Earth to retrieve The Mask so it can be permanently returned to Asgard  is in the very beginning of the movie. Yes, that's right, Loki and Odin are in the movie. Marvel actually does not own the rights to the Norse Gods. They have been around forever and are pretty much public domain. Frankly, I am surprised no other studio has made their own Thor movies in recent years.

Since the last movie, The Mask has somehow floated upriver from where it was tossed, and ended up in a stream in the suburbs of Edge City where it is found by a dog, and brought back to the home of Tim Avery ( Jamie Kennedy ) an aspiring animator who is trying to get his boss at the....well, I am not sure exactly what the company is that Tim works at other than they make him wear a turtle costume to entertain children....anyway, Tim wants to convince his boss to make a network cartoon series that Tim will animate. Meanwhile his wife ( Traylor Howard  ) wants a baby, even though her husband is clearly too immature to be a parent. On the night of the company Halloween party, the dog has chewed up the original  mask for Tim's zombie costume, and instead he takes the mask that his dog has found. Putting it on, Tim turns into The Mask, and becomes the life of the party. Tim's boss ( Steven Wright ) is impressed, and wants Tim to develop his costume into an animated series they can pitch to a network. Meanwhile Tim had worn the mask home and impregnated his wife while wearing it. She gives birth to a son who turns out to have the same powers of The Mask without having to wear it. Meanwhile the dog has buried the mask since the party, and once it becomes jealous of the new baby, digs it up and puts it on to become a Mask Dog. This leads to a bunch of Roadrunner inspired mayhem between the magic baby and the suddenly intelligent dog. Meanwhile Loki, who has the same powers as The Mask, has spent most of the movie trying to find it and using his powers against anyone who gets into his way. He finally tracks The Mask to Tim's house and ends up abducting the baby, leading up to a showdown between Tim wearing The Mask and Loki ( where inexplicably the magic baby does not get involved. )

And that is as much of the movie I care to describe. I think I may have actually made it seem better than it actually is. And the sad thing is that this movie had a lot of potential. It had a far more decent cast than it deserved, including Allan Cumming as Loki and Bob Hoskins as Odin. But despite a talented cast, everyone walks through their roles and makes no attempt at a decent performance. Most depressing is when Jamie Kennedy turns into The Mask, at which point he was suppose to step up his performance as the over the top character, but instead steps his performance down. It is a lackluster monotone performance that conveys his emotions as: " I wish I was not wearing this costume".  Think of George Lazenby's performance in that one James Bond film he did, and then tone it down ten notches, and you'll get the picture. The only person in this movie to give a decent performance ( and I am including the extras as well ) is Traylor Howard as Tim's wife and mother of the magic baby. She is such a joy to watch that you feel devastated this movie ended her film career. She deserves to be a household name in much better films, or at the least the star of her own sitcom. Instead she ended up on Monk for it's last three seasons as his assistant.

Another thing this movie had for it was outstanding production design and special effects. The movie may be a torture to watch, but is usually a pleasure to look at. The best I can describe it is that the sets look similar to the imaginative style of the television series Pushing Daisies, although the costumes seem out of Lazy Town. Which leads to the two things that doomed this movie. One was the half assed attempt to make this a children's movie. This was the reason for the odd set designs, as well as the reason for the focus to be on a magic baby and a cute doggie. But while the concept was aimed at preschool kids, the subject matter was not suitable. When a cute doggie puts on a mask and becomes a scary green doggie, small children become upset. And New Line wanted the movie to appeal to adults as well, perhaps when they realized how expensive it would be to film. The other thing wrong was the script written by Lance Khazei, who despite having worked on The Chevy Chase Show and Politically Incorrect, and writing a few Nickelodeon cartoons in between, delivered a movie that was devoid of any humor. Lance's idea of funny was to steal gags from classic animated cartoons without any of the references that made those original gags funny. Perhaps an argument could be made to how the cast did not attempt to make the material work. But then again most of the gags were done with CGI generated characters, and the CGI was flawless, which leaves the blame squarely on the material.




The Bank Dick ( 1940 )
 
This was sort of disappointing. The Bank Dick is regarded as WC Fields best film and one of only three of his movies selected for preservation by the National Film Registry. But I just did not find it as funny as many of his other films. There is still a lot to laugh at, but just not as much wise cracks as the previous films. And the climatic chase scene was just Fields in a car with unconvincing back projection. A bank robber has robbed the bank where Fields works as a security guard, then forces Fields to drive the getaway car. And for the next six minutes we get a lot of cliche gags, such as when the crook demands Fields hands him the wheel, and Fields pulls it off the dashboard and hands it to him. That gag was not funny in the first film I saw it in, nor in the hundreds of other films it was used in. Okay, so maybe I did not laugh as much because I ended up watching this move at 4:00 am after watching Son of the Mask, and was a touch exhausted during it's third act. But as far as I am concerned, It's A Gift was Fields best film, not The Bank Dick


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16901 on: July 24, 2016, 10:39:53 PM »
Cars

This is one of the few Pixar movies I haven't seen and it lived up to its reputation as one of the lesser ones.  It's certainly the worst one I've seen (I haven not seen Cars 2) and while it isn't "bad" is surprisingly lifeless and makes a number of bad choices.  Probably the most egregious are the times when race car drivers, who are clearly not actors, are brought in to fact.  In fact, pretty much every pop culture reference and cameo fails here.  This is lesser DreamWorks stuff and takes away from what little story there is.  I am a sucker for sports movies, so I was hoping it would be effecting on that level.  It has its moments on that front but it overall is pretty dull.  Also, pretty much all of the casting is WAY too on the nose, in a way that once again feels too DreamWorks for its own good.  And last, the emotional stakes aren't that strong and the jokes aren't very funny.  Not awful but I definitely see why it is a black mark on Pixar's otherwise strong track record (HOW IRONIC!).

Also, why did the movie decide in it's last moments that Edie McClurg and Richard Kind should be banished to the wastelands.


Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16902 on: July 24, 2016, 11:02:33 PM »
Yeah, I don't MIND Cars (I think it's pitched at a younger audience too), but Cars 2 is bananas in how bad it is.
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Offline Pak-Man

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16903 on: July 24, 2016, 11:05:18 PM »
I've always enjoyed the ol' "Guy who doesn't know he's in a spy scenario aces a spy scenario" joke, so Cars 2 has that much going for it. And while the original is definitely at the bottom of the Pixar barrel, it's still pretty good. It's not DreamWorks bad, anyway...


Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16904 on: July 25, 2016, 12:09:00 AM »
I couldn't make it all the way through it.
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