Author Topic: What was the last movie you watched?  (Read 1540586 times)

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Online The Lurker

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16845 on: June 19, 2016, 04:20:29 PM »
I did like how the love interest was better handled than a lot of superhero films I've seen.  As far as Reynolds goes, I don't really have an issue with him, just the characters he plays.


Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16846 on: June 19, 2016, 06:08:26 PM »
Unfortunately, I can't see myself watching Deadpool again. Yes, it's a damn good movie, but it doesn't really fit with my home life and since I don't think I'm ever going to talk my dad or mom(especially my mom) into ever watching it, I see no need to purchase it.

I will tell you one thing, I owe this movie a big thank you for finally telling me which song that was that I heard and could never figure out what it was and it was Careless Whisper on Wham's "Make it big" album.


Offline stethacantus

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16847 on: June 19, 2016, 10:11:02 PM »
Beach Blanket Bingo ( 1965 )
I have mentioned before that I am a Buster Keaton fan. I bought all of his classic silent films, followed by his not so classic early sound films made for MGM. Then his first films where he was Fatty Arbuckle's sidekick. Then came a set of all his sound shorts made for Columbia, followed by a set of his sound shorts made for Educational. Inevitably I had worked my way down to his later years where he was only offered co-star and bit part roles ( with exception to a couple of starring roles in foreign language productions ). The thing is, if I am a fan of someone then I am usually a completest. I even bought  Sunset Boulevard ( 1950 ) for his five second cameo. Which is why months ago I worked my way down to API's Beach Party movies which were among the last films that Keaton acted in. Buster was in four of them. API produced 12 films that fell into their Beach Party series. Five of them alone were popped out between April and November of 1965. And according to almost everyone who has seen the series, it is very bad. Early 60s movies made for teenagers, starring actors too old to be in their teens, written by adults in their 50s. Hollywood's moronic idea of what teenagers do at the beach.

Almost all of them starred Annette Funicello, the teen star who's huge breasts first blossomed as a kid member of The Mickey Mouse Club in the 1950s, and were hidden for the rest of the decade as Annette starred in wholesome Disney movies. Now in her 20s, API wisely knew that the former male fans of MMC would gladly pay to see Annette frolic around in a bathingsuit. To bring in the girls API hired pop star Frankie Avalon, who in the series was usually Annette's love interest. The rest of the cast was filled out by other actors in their 20s and 30s playing Frankie and Annette's teenage friends. When not showing Annette and friends on the beach, the rest of the films were padded with guest stars. Sometimes they were top 40 singers and bands who dropped by the beach to perform their hits, but much of the time comedians who needed the work. API did not exactly invent the beach party genre ( I think the Gidget films came first ), but had made the genre so popular that other studios began releasing their own beach films. Within a couple of years the genre was well worn out. API responded by taking their usual gang of kids off the beach and putting them in horror films and spy parodies. The last two films in the series dealt exclusively with the new popular movie trend, stock car racing. Eventually API did away with the beach party gang and made racing films exclusively with different casts. By the end of the 60s the Beach Party series was a forgotten nightmare.

I spent my life managing never seeing any of the Beach Party films. My era was the Brat Pack films, and I could barely stomach those. Random Beach Party films would occasionally air on local television, often during the late hours. But I avoided them. The only Beach Party genre films I have ever seen are Catalina Caper ( 1967 ),The Horror of Party Beach ( 1964 ) and Village of the Giants ( 1965 ), and all because they were on MST3K. None of them were from the API series. But thanks to Buster Keaton, watching the API series became unavoidable. MGM home video had the rights to the API film library, randomly releasing various Beach Party  films, some as single movies, some as part of their Midnight Movies Double Feature. Some were already OOP, the remaining stock being sold for $50 a disc. The cheapest option was to buy the Frankie & Annette MGM Movie Legends Collection which was still in print and only $10. I had hoped it would have the entire API series, but unfortunately it was  four films short. Not included in the set were Ghost in the Invisible Bikini ( 1966 ), Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine ( 1965 ) ( which in turn had it's own sequel Dr. Goldfoot and the Girl Bombs ( 1966 ) without the Beach Party regulars ) and two of the films with Buster Keaton, Pajama Party ( 1964 ) and Sergeant Deadhead ( 1965 ). If I want to blow $50 on a used DVD that is sourced from the pan & scan for VHS master then I can still get Pajama Party, while Warner Brothers recently included Sergeant Deadhead as part of their Warner Archives collection for about $15 a DVD. 

And I am in no rush to own them. I bought the Frankie/Annette collection over three years ago, and I have only just gotten around to watching it this week. The decision was to watch a Beach Party film each Saturday, being that it is summer. If they really suck that much, then I will simply abandon watching the rest of the films after watching the two with Buster ( and fortunately, the two Buster films are both on disc 1 ). If they are not that bad, or even slightly entertaining, then I will give the entire set a chance. There is even the ( ever so slight ) possibility that I will enjoy the movies, which would suck considering I already submitted my picks for my favorite movie series to the new LoC list. As I write this I have not watched any of them yet. So here goes nothing.....

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Oh God!

I just finished watching Beach Blanket Bingo. And I can definitely say that the decades of avoiding it was well worth it. This movie was so embarrassingly bad that for a while I debated if I should even admit here that I had seen it, or hide my shame of ever even putting the disc in my DVD player.

While not exactly as bad as Catalina Caper, it is still bad. It is suppose to be a comedy. But this movie's idea of a gag is when a person standing in a room suddenly falls down for no reason accompanied by a goofy "bonk" sound effect. ( You know, the same sound effect the Banana Splits make when they fall down. Only in a movie meant for adults. ) Aside from the bad sight gags, the film is full of zappy one liners that fail to zap. Most of them one character putting down another for no reason. And it is also a musical, filled with those songs you forget seconds after they were sung.

So basically, there are a bunch of teens populating a beach with no parents about, who stay out at all hours of the night, drink the occasional alcohol drink, and who never go to school. They can get away with this because these minors are all in their late 20s to early 30s. Sort of like Jersey Shore if no one on Jersey Shore ever got intoxicated or ever had intercourse, and if everyone on Jersey Shore were a bunch of borewads. The beach is visited by a pop singer named Sugar Kane ( Linda Evans ) who wants to publicise her new album to the scant 20 or so teens living there by staging a sky diving stunt, thought up by her swarmy agent ( Paul Lynde ). The "teens" are impressed, not so much by meeting a celebrity, but by sky diving. And so the next day they are all visiting the sky diving school run by Don Rickles ( Given the worst one liners of his career. They could have at least allowed him to use material from his act. ) and Don's assistant Buster Keaton. At the school a really dumb love rectangle develops between the female flight instructor who falls for Frankie, and the male flight instructor ( who is also the boyfriend of the female instructor ) who sort of falls for Annette. Or something like that. But enough to cause Annette to be angry at Frankie for most of the film, and the male flight instructor threatening to do some harm to Frankie after Frankie is accused of raping the female flight instructor.  ( It is all innocent. The female flight instructor removed her blouse to frame Frankie when he refused to make out with her on the plane. )

Meanwhile the beach idiot, a teen named Bonehead who's every other line is something stupid, discovers and falls in love with a mermaid. She briefly grows feet, accompanies Bonehead to a party, then tells him they must part so she can go back to being a mermaid. I think it was suppose to be dramatic. Of course no one believes Bonehead when he says his girlfriend is a mermaid. Oh, and there is a motorcycle gang. Because back in 1960s California there was apparently an ongoing feud between the bikers and the surfers. ( That's right. The "teens" in this movie are suppose to also be surfers. Although the only time you see one surfing, he wipes out on a small wave. ) Yea, you remember the great biker/surfer feud that between 1963 and 1967 littered the beaches with bodies and turned the surf red?  Or so that would be the case if the bikers and surfers in the 60s were not as equally lame, and the leader of the biker gangs back then were not incompetent klutzes. When the surfers and bikers in this movie finally have a fight, it is full of stunts commonly seen in a western saloon brawl, accompanied by the wacky "bonk" sound effects you would expect to hear in a fight with a bike gang. And no one gets killed, or bleeds despite being thrown through plate glass windows, or ends up hurt in any way. Well, anyway, the biker gang kidnaps Sugar Kane ( remember her? ) and the surfers have to rescue her. And after that the film sort of stops.

Okay, the only reason I put myself through this was because Buster Keaton was in the movie. And while even Buster is not given any good material to work with, the man knows how to make even the lamest sight gag work. And there is no doubt Buster put his own twist on the stunts he did. For example, while at a party where the "teens" are all dancing, Buster decides to dance as well. The gag here is that old man Buster is a bad dancer, but he ads to the gag by somehow punching himself in the face and knocking himself backwards onto a chair that also falls backwards, landing him on the back of his head. That sort of stunt would be painful for a younger man to do. Buster was 69 at the time and probably already suffering from the effects of the cancer that would kill him months later. But no one knew how to take very painful looking pratfalls like Buster, and executed one in his movies every chance he got, often without letting the director know in advance he would be doing it. While nothing Buster did made me laugh, it at the least brough a smile to my face. He is in this film so little that it is obvious he was only paid for one or two days work, shooting bits and pieces that would be dispersed throughout the film. But the film makers at the least had the intelligence to recognize Keaton's talents, and had him dancing and doing other gags in the closing credits.

Aside from Buster Keaton, this was a painful movie to watch. There is nothing worse than watching poorly executed comedy that was never funny in the first place accompanied by silly sound effects. And I still have to watch at least one more of these. But I do not think I want to spend the rest of my summer watching the rest of the set. I had hoped that I could find a rifftrax for these films to make the next one more palatable, but apparently no rifftrax of the API Beach Party films exist. So on the off chance that anyone from Rifftrax reads these threads, how about it? If you have not given up releasing movies on home video, the entire API Beach Party series has never been released as a complete set, and many have never been scanned for widescreen home video releases. I would gladly buy and watch the entire series if each film had a Rifftrax. Warner currently has these films and other than Seargent Deadhead is doing nothing with them. Perhaps a deal could be worked out?


The Karate Kid ( 1984 )
Well, that was unpleasant.  Fortunately the next film today happens to be something that is critically acclaimed. The Karate Kid was one of the major 80's films I have never seen. Amazing considering the summer of 1984 I bought more movie tickets than any other summer before or since. But instead of seeing The Karate Kid, went to see  Police Academy, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Star Trek III: The Search For Spock, Streets of Fire, Ghostbusters, Gremlins, The Last Starfighter and Footloose as part of a double feature with Flashdance. But perhaps the main reason I had avoided seeing it that summer, or since, was because it was a martial arts movie starring Ralph Macchio. The name "Ralph Macchio" and the words "martial arts movie" have no business being in the same sentence. And yet, it happened. This was the 80s. America had not yet figured out how to make a martial arts film. Meanwhile, one of my local television stations aired martail arts movies every Saturday. The good ones that came from Hong Kong. Those ones were wall to wall fights. The American ones were satisfied with maybe  two short fights in the entire film. Even when someone like Chuck Norris made a movie, you would need to sit through half hour blocks of "plot" before he kicked a few guys. An American martial arts movie starring Ralph Macchio who is being trained by Arnold from Happy Days was just not appealing to me.

Much like I had expected, The Karate Kid is mostly drama with very few fight scenes. Half of it is a pretty lame romance story between Ralph Macchio and Elisabeth Shue. He's poor, she's rich, the parent's don't approve and would rather she continues to go out with this other jerk. And that jerk just happens to be the top student at the town's only Karate school, one run by an evil master who teaches his students "no mercy for your opponent". So naturally the jerk beats Ralph up every chance he gets. Eventually the janitor of the building Ralph lives in takes pity on him and teaches him Karate. It is the relationship between Ralph and his teacher Mr. Miyagi that is what makes this film worth watching. The martial arts you can forget about. The film ends with Ralph participating in a tournament where each fight ends after three points are scored, gradually working his way up to the finals where he fights ( you guessed it ) the jerk for the title. Each fight is short, and not memorable. But that is to be expected in an American martial arts film. Fortunately the story of how Ralph got to that tournament is charming enough to make up for the lack of a decent fight scene. I do take issue with Ralph using crane style kung fu during the final fight when it is suppose to be a karate tournament.


Darkman III: Die Darkman Die ( 1996 )
And now I have to watch this. Fortunately this is the last film in my Darkman box set. It is actually better than Darkman II: The Return of Durant, but that's not saying much. The film opens with a montage explaining who Darkman is. And it claims that Darkman is now a crime fighter much like Batman. However, once again, there is no evidence in this movie that Darkman actually fights crime other than stealing money from drug dealers to buy his lab equipment.   In this movie he has super strength due to elevated levels of adrenalin in his blood, something missing from the previous film. But that hardly matters. Most of the movie Darkman is running away from criminals. For me the best thing about this movie was seeing Nigel Bennett in the cast. But that was only because it reminded me of his superior work in the series Lexx. Arnold Vosloo plays Darkman, and is once again fourth billing in the credits.

The Old Fashioned Way ( 1934 )
WC Field's plays The Great McGonigle, the manager of an acting troupe. Thanks to low attendance at their plays, the troupe has resorted to sneaking out of the towns they had performed in, dodging the bills they owed to various boarding houses. With The Great McGonigle, Fields had the opportunity to play the type of screen character he loved the most, the traveling con artist. The play McGonigle performs is The Drunkard  'or'  The Fallen Saved, a  temperance melodrama written in 1844 to preach the evils of drinking. During the early 1800s the play was very popular. P.T. Barnum himself staged the play at his American Museum in New York City where it ran for more that 100 performances, ending only when Barnum's museum burned down in 1865. It was considered old fashioned by 1900, and by the beginning of the motion picture sound era, was often parodied for being the archetype of the old fashioned melodrama. The Old Fashioned Way was one of those films. Another was The Villain Still Persued Her ( 1940 ) which costarred Buster Keaton. Between those two movies I have seen the play twice. In actuality, the performance of The Drunkard is the weakest part of the movie. The best material happens outside the play as McGonigle cons his way out of several situations. The movie even gives us a chance to see Fields' juggling act from his stage show, as The Great McGonigle treats the audience to a bonus performance after the play ends. Once again, another enjoyable WC Fields film.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2016, 05:48:40 PM by stethacantus »


Offline Charles Castle

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16848 on: June 20, 2016, 08:44:27 PM »
When I was describing Berberian Sound Studio (2012, directed by Peter Strickland) to a friend of mine shortly after viewing it, his response was "Oh, so it's Blow Out?" I laughed, because that's kind of what I thought from the synopsis I had read of the film prior to seeing it. But, no. It's not Blow Out, though it does share with that film a narrative built overtly on the craft of filmmaking--of sound, in particular--as text rather than as form and it does crib Blow Out's best joke. Like Blow Out, it's almost impossible to divorce Berberian Sound Studio from the patterns of influence exerted from other movies. This is true of most movies, I think, but Berberian Sound Studio is different. Its touchstones are deliberately invoked as talismans or dire warnings throughout rather than as homages or casual swipes. It's also a boldly experimental plunge into cinema as complete abstraction. It builds a formidable sense of menace mainly through sound divorced from image. An audience for horror movies might be forgiven for chafing at the way this film plunges off the narrative deep end in its last act, but I found it thrilling.

The story here follows a sound designer, Gilderoy, as he arrives in Italy to work on a movie sometime in the 1970s. That movie turns out to be "The Equestrian Vortex," a credible mash-up of several Italian horror movies from the period. We never see any footage for this film apart from its startling credit sequence, which plays where the credit sequence for the real-world film, Berberian Sound Studio, ought to play. That's the first hint that this is some kind of epistemological delirium. Gilderoy is a fish out of water. Worse, he's chum in a pool of sharks. The head shark is the film's producer, Francesco, who gives Gilderoy unsolicited advice on how to comport himself and gives him the runaround when it comes to the business of paying Gilderoy for his flight to Italy. Only slightly less menacing are Santini, the womanizing director who "casts the film with his dick" and who has a pretentious conception of what kind of film he's making. Even the receptionist, the gorgeous, hostile Elena, seems complicit in Gilderoy's misery. Still, Gilderoy is an artist, and he gets to work on the sound of the film, working with the foley artists, who massacre various fruits and vegetables to get the sound of mayhem down, and the actresses hired to post-dub dialogue and screams. One of these is Sylvia, who has been seduced and abandoned by Santini. She wants revenge, and conspires to sabotage the film. Meanwhile, Gilderoy's grasp of reality has come unhinged. The images he sees in the film disturb him and invade his dreams. Soon, he finds it difficult to distinguish between the film and reality. Late in the film, Gilderoy's reality fractures, and with it, so does the film. In place of narrative, we have a dream fugue that builds on the soundscape the first part of the film has built...

As you might expect from a movie that's set in a sound studio, this is a movie in which sound is paramount. We never, ever, see any of the footage for The Equestrian Vortex, but through the sounds that the movie makes both in the frame and outside it, we get a pretty good idea of what it's about and what it puts on screen. It's not only sound, though. This is an unusually sensory film, one that engages the hearing directly, but which also evokes responses from the other five senses. The textures of vegetables are lovingly shown in close up. The smell of rotting food is suggested by a pit full of the food items that have been massacred in the name of mimicking dismemberments. One of the Foley artists hands Gilderoy a watermelon to eat. Unlike other, similarly sensory films, this mostly intends to revolt the audience. It's a substitute for actual onscreen violence.

There's a point at the beginning of this film's third act when the film itself burns away to reveal the kinds of banal documentaries Gilderoy made back in England. This comes after Gilderoy slips into a recursive version of his own movie. This sequence is a farewell to naturalism as the film becomes oneiric. In retrospect, the filmmakers have been foreshadowing this from the outset, with its repeated shots of a sign flashing a red "Silenzio," as a callback to David Lynch's Mulholland Drive, which features a similar break from narrative. Typical of this film's setting, it communicates this break through sound: Gilderoy, a fish out of water early in the film, suddenly becomes fluent in Italian and he becomes something of a sadist with sound, using it to try to elicit a better scream from one of his voice actresses.

In truth, I'm not really sure what happens at the end of this movie. I'm not even sure it matters. This isn't a film about plot points; it's not a film that wants to give you a story, so much as it's a film that wants to evoke moods and emotions. It's a film that provides symbols: rotting vegetables, sound equipment, whispered dialogue about witches and torture. For all that, its indictment of the misogyny before and behind the camera in certain sectors of cinema is pointed and in the text of the film rather than coded in symbols. The film's most striking moment, a screaming actress in a soundbooth, is as much a manifestation of feminine (and feminist) rage as anything. What makes this film disturbing is the way it suggests that Gilderoy becomes inured to this rage, and becomes coopted by the film's internal patriarchy in the end. In doing so, he loses himself.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2016, 08:53:57 PM by Charles Foster Castle »
You know, if the space man puma thing turns out to be the correct religion, I for one will be very surprised.


Offline Charles Castle

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16849 on: June 20, 2016, 08:55:37 PM »
I went into The Colony (2013, directed by Jeff Renfroe) completely blind. I knew nothing about it except that it was a science fiction/horror hybrid. I like going into a movie blind, to tell the truth, because it allows that movie to surprise me. That most movies rarely do speaks either to a lack of ambition on the part of filmmakers or to my own jaded familiarity with movie tropes. Regardless, it's up to the film to break through that. The Colony isn't that film. About a third of the way through the film, I realized that I was watching a zombie movie in post-apocalyptic dress. Well, crap, I thought.

The story here follows the fortune of the inhabitants of Colony 7, one of the few remaining outposts of humanity after a weather-control solution to global warming goes horribly, horribly wrong and brings on an eternal winter. Colony 7's population is dwindling. They're having a hard time keeping their livestock alive, and they're out of medicine to treat even common ailments. The flu has decimated them, and now they quarantine even a mild cough, and exile those who have more serious symptoms. The ruthlessness of their quarantine is a bone of contention between Mason, who is responsible for executing the sick, and Briggs, who is nominally the head of the colony. Mason wants even more ruthless measures. Briggs wants to preserve life as long as he can. Into this conflict comes news that contact with Colony 5 has been lost. Briggs leads an expedition to find out what happened to them. He takes Sam and Graydon with him. Sam is a weary, having just failed to prevent Mason from executing a man who should have been left to walk into the wilderness. Sam has a reason to live: he's partnered with Kai, who manages the tech and science for the colony. It's Kai who Briggs puts in charge of things in his absence, much to the annoyance of Mason. Graydon is young, and it's his first extended trip on the surface. After a long trek through a frozen landscape, they arrive at Colony 5, only to discover that most of the inhabitants there are dead, killed by a band of feral cannibals. In escaping from their clutches, our heroes run the risk of leading them back to their own colony...

The set-up of this movie is pretty good post-apocalypse sci-fi. The frozen world this film posits is agreeably haunting, with visions of ruined cities and frozen wastelands and the constant keening of the wind. The technology of filmmaking has become so democratized that even a film as low-budget as this one has the means to create new worlds, and it uses those means well. The principle settings of this film are creatively used: a wrecked helicopter, a bridge falling into ruin, the two colonies. The two colonies were dressed from an abandoned NATO facility and are conceived after the seed vaults that have been built at the arctic circle in Norway and elsewhere. The weather control facilities that figure in the background are nicely science fiction-y, too. So I was grooving on this as it spent its time world building, hoping against hope that the creativity on display in the background would extend to its existential threat. A monster, perhaps--the movie has a very Thing-like ambiance, after all.

The nature of the threat when it rears its ugly face is a disappointment. I mean, sure, it follows logically from the premise of the movie, but that doesn't make the pill go down any easier. The scene where our heroes stumble across the cannibal killing floor is effective and ghastly enough, sure. And there's some entertaining gore scenes sprinkled throughout, but do we really need another zombie movie in another guise? I'm happy that the filmmakers draw a parallel between its cannibals and Bill Paxton's Mason, who is only a few steps away from them on the sliding scale of post-apocalyptic morality, but this thread could have been followed in other ways.

Still, it's not all bad. Kevin Zegers has grown into a credible leading man, while Laurence Fishburne continues to settle into a late career as a character actor. Charlotte Sullivan is good as Kai, who exudes a quiet competence even if they damsel her in the end (boo!). Paxton's character is like a summation of the kinds of characters he used to play in the 1980s: Hudson from Aliens all grown up, perhaps, or seasoned with Severen from Near Dark. Paxton has been playing Everymen for a couple of decades now, so it's nice to see him back in this kind of role even if he doesn't invest it with his full attention (perhaps a function of screen time--I'm sure they didn't have him for many shooting days).

There's a good movie hiding in this film, somewhere. It has resources, it's well-shot and well-designed, and it tries to step outside the comfort level of your stock sci-fi horror film. It has ambition. It even tickles my own appetite for eschatological horror movies. But that good movie is mired in the tropes of a contemporary genre that strangles it. Oh well.
You know, if the space man puma thing turns out to be the correct religion, I for one will be very surprised.


Offline Charles Castle

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16850 on: June 20, 2016, 09:30:51 PM »
Seeing that late last year has put me on a David Lean kick - he's my most watched director so far this year.
I am a big fan as well. In fact, I'm a part of a burgeoning cult that considers Ryan's Daughter to be an unsung masterpiece. Do look into it if you haven't had the chance yet, or lately. I never held it in much esteem until a theater viewing last year.
You know, if the space man puma thing turns out to be the correct religion, I for one will be very surprised.


Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16851 on: June 20, 2016, 10:42:25 PM »
Seeing that late last year has put me on a David Lean kick - he's my most watched director so far this year.
I am a big fan as well. In fact, I'm a part of a burgeoning cult that considers Ryan's Daughter to be an unsung masterpiece. Do look into it if you haven't had the chance yet, or lately. I never held it in much esteem until a theater viewing last year.

It screened in a theatre here late last year, but I wasn't able to make it. I still haven't seen it.
FINE


Offline CJones

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16852 on: June 21, 2016, 04:11:11 PM »
Nothing But Trouble

I was watching a Youtube video recently about the new Ghostbusters movie and the fact that Dan Akroyd was praising it, and someone mentioned that "this is coming from the guy that wrote and directed Nothing But Trouble". I distinctly remember loathing that movie, but it had been probably 20 years since I saw it last, and there were a lot of bits (most notably Mr Bonestripper) that really stuck in my mind. I thought to myself, "for some reason I really want to see that movie again, even if just to see if it's as bad as I remember". Well, it is as bad as I remember, but I can't really say I hated it. It's like a trainwreck. You're not happy that it happened, but since it did, you want to look at it. It's strangely entertaining. The most accurate way to describe it would be, imagine The Rocky Horror Picture Show without the songs or music. Some people have said it's like a comedy version of Texas Chainsaw Massacre. To my knowledge this is the first and last movie Dan Akroyd ever directed.

I highly recommend this podcast review of it, from The Flop House, with guest reviewer John Hodgeman. It is hilarious.

http://www.flophousepodcast.com/2016/03/episode-200-nothing-but-trouble


<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/enUo-1TjdEs" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/enUo-1TjdEs</a>


Offline Darth Geek

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16853 on: June 21, 2016, 05:46:24 PM »

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/enUo-1TjdEs" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/enUo-1TjdEs</a>
Is it just me, or does the Mister Bonestripper face look like The Babadook?



Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16854 on: June 22, 2016, 07:24:04 PM »
Watching ROTOR yet again. I know I've sung the praises of this film before... but seriously, this movie is the greatest movie EVER.. to bear a title that is a palindrome!  ;D


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16855 on: June 26, 2016, 04:54:01 PM »
Sin City: A Dame to Kill For

I have to re-watch the first one again to really compare since it's been so long since I last watched it, but first impression is that the first one was better.

The story with the gambler on a win streak was mediocre, the sequel story with Jessica Alba was a bit uneven in tone and buildup, the story with Eva Green as the evil manipulator actually kept me guessing for a little while as to what was really going on and was the best segment.


Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16856 on: June 26, 2016, 05:00:38 PM »
I didn't like Sin City ADTKF much either as I recall. That might be also due to not liking the tone or something.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16857 on: June 26, 2016, 07:39:36 PM »
Picnic at Hanging Rock

Wow, this was so good.  I had never seen it before last night but it is an amazing, creepy film.  The funny thing is one of the big themes of the movie (according to wikipedia), repression of sexuality, isn't what I latched onto.  Of course, the repression of the girls in this movie and the restrained lives they have to live is.  I love that while they didn't make Mrs. Appleyard likable, they gave her a tremendous sadness and that she's both confronted with an event she has no idea how to deal with and she clearly has some issue with who she is.  She's also something of an enigma herself, and though we can get some insight into her, there's clearly so much we don't know (though she was likely like a lot of the students at the school).  I will be rewatching this, and I think I'll get more out of it each time.


Offline Darth Geek

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16858 on: June 26, 2016, 07:45:42 PM »
CLOWN  (2014) - This was really good. Since it was based on a short I thought it'd take forever before it got to anything important,  but no, he's in the clown suit for the party before the end of the opening credits.



Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #16859 on: June 26, 2016, 09:00:17 PM »
Watched the director's cut of Alien. I don't think there's a whole lot to say about this movie that hasn't already been said but on a technical level it is spectacular. I've said this at least once before but I am still astounded by the level of craftsmanship that went into everything: set design, models, creature effects, and every actor in the movie is outstanding. All of this in 1978/79, a movie when Sci-Fi films were still something of a gamble for the studios, maybe even a novelty and only taken to a truly serious level with the likes of 2001, Star Wars, and Close Encounters.