Author Topic: What was the last movie you watched?  (Read 1582794 times)

0 Members and 3 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Thrifty Version II

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 984
  • Liked: 556
  • Now with 30% Less Fat!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12870 on: June 25, 2013, 06:22:32 AM »
I also saw The Internship a few weeks ago, which is a bad idea and nobody should do that, ever.  I've been meaning to write an extended rant on how awful it is, but let me just say this: it almost became the second movie I ever walked out on in a theater.  This movie could be shown in film schools to define the term "formulaic film making".
I agree that it was horribly formulaic, but I knew that going in.

I didn't have high expectations either, but it still performed worse than those low expectations I set.

Quote
I didn't think it was awful, and it's really hard for me to be too critical of something that screamed "silly root for the underdog comedy" from the get-go. If the execution is at least passable and you bring me a handful of decent chuckles / laughs... Then I'll probably not feel ripped off.

See I think that's a cop-out.  It's like when Michael Bay releases one of his horrid little cinematic abominations and people say "Oh, it's a popcorn movie.  Just turn your brain off."  Just because you're not trying to make great cinema doesn't mean that you don't even try to make decent cinema.  Literally every character in this movie, with the possible exception of the two leads,  was some broad stereotype.  The nervous overachieving Asian.  The jaded young hipster.  The nervous white guy who tries to act black.  The Hollywood Homely geek girl.  The uptight career woman who just needs the irresistible charm of the male lead.  The stern taskmaster boss and the cool boss.  Stereotypes, not characters.

Don't get me started on the entire failed premise of the movie.  These guys are apparently amazing salesmen.  They lose their job selling watches and... suddenly no other company in the world needs salesmen?  Any time I look in the help wanted ads, I see ads for sales jobs left and right.  Presumably these have high turnover because it's a rough job and not so many people have the charisma to be good at it.  But these guys do.  It's established that they are terrific salesmen.  So when the company they work for goes belly up, they can't think of any solution other than to try to break into a field they have absolutely no experience with?  What's more is that not only did they go to work for Google, but it never occurred to them that Google has its own sales and marketing department.  Correct me if I'm wrong, but since they provide so many free services, don't they get a large portion of their revenue through ad sales?  No, these idiots, who don't even understand the most simplistic computing terms like "bug" and "code", decide to try and become programmers.

Aside from that, the implementation is stupid.  Google runs an internship program like a game of Survivor, except points are arbitrarily distributed and all the events are completely irrelevant except for the last one.  Because of plot contrivance bullshit.  Because they had to make the ad sales portion count for more than any of the other competitions combined so that they could overwrite the other plot contrivance bullshit with the tech support competition.

Worst of all is the stakes they set up in the middle of the film.  The young people on the Vaughn/Wilson Team bemoan the fact that they're worried they won't get jobs after college if they don't "win" the internship contest.  It's a valid enough concern in general; young folks today have a tough time finding work right out of college.  But that's nothing new.  My dad graduated college in the early 70s and it took him years to find office work.  But more to the point, it's not nearly as hard for skilled Computer Science graduates from top schools like these kids are.  The film misrepresents the struggle of new college graduates by saying that there's no variation, that a Computer Science graduate from MIT is going to have just as hard a time getting a job as, like, a History major from Arizona State.  That's just not true.

BUT.... set aside the previous criticism, and just accept that those are the stakes for the world they live in.  This means that 95% of the interns are utterly fucked, but we're supposed to be happy because our 5% won.  But forget that... what's really absurd is that in the final scene, the fucked 95% are cheering the people who fucked them over.

It's horseshit.  The whole movie is shoddy writing, a deeply flawed premise, and a serious of annoying stereotype characters.


Offline Nunyerbiz

  • Mayor of Nilbog
  • *****
  • Posts: 3400
  • Liked: 953
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12871 on: June 25, 2013, 09:19:16 AM »
It's horseshit.  The whole movie is shoddy writing, a deeply flawed premise, and a serious of annoying stereotype characters.

Yes, I agree. And my feeling leaving the theater was "meh, it had some funny moments" ... Which is basically all I said in my first response. That said, I will give ya props for putting way more thought into the script than the actual writers did.


Offline Charles Castle

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 877
  • Liked: 526
  • I crap bigger than this movie.
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12872 on: June 26, 2013, 04:23:04 PM »
It's very difficult for me to come to terms with In the Realm of the Senses (1976, Nagisa Ôshima) or to account fully or lucidly for my response to it. To dismiss it as porn is to miss the very intense and tactile reality of the two actors/characters (there's hardly any distinction really) onscreen. To call it art is to incite a debate as to what art constitutes. To judge it harshly in terms of normal, healthy relationships (as I often feel inclined to do) is to miss the point. Leaving those conventions behind, I'll just say that for me this film simply occupies its own sphere of existence; and as I watch it I realize that my own act of viewing is very much like that of the geishas and servants who watch with a mix of horror and fascination these two lovers who copulate and copulate like there's no tomorrow, taking their intercourse to the ultimate limit -- sex as a social revolution turned tragedy. Like them I am embarrassed and mildly offended to be in their presence, but if only because I am confronted with my own limits in sharing the intimacy of others. That's not the same as a porn movie, where the viewer is implicitly invited as a participant in the onscreen proceedings and can watch as an invisible pleasure-seeker; here every outrageous moment in this movie implicates the viewer's involvement, whether it be one of complicity or disgust. It also can be seen as a scathing critique of Japanese male-female relations, and how the lust to conquer and subjugate on both sides of the gender divide becomes an impulse that consumes and destroys. But ultimately, I find it to be one of the most stunning and confounding studies in desire the cinema has produced; not only the desire of the two lovers onscreen, but that of the viewer's desire as well.

***

I first saw Crispin Glover present his debut film, the surreal, deliberately offensive What Is It?, accompanied by his dramatic presentation of "The Big Slide Show," about five years ago at a cinema that has since been bulldozed and turned into condos. He was in New York last week to present Part II of the "It" trilogy, It Is Fine! Everything is Fine (2007, Crispin Glover), a more narratively cohesive film combining physical disability with sexuality in a no less provocative light.

First, a little background info. The script was written back in the 80s by Steven C. Stewart, a man born with a severe case of cerebral palsy, who was institutionalized after the death of his mother as a young man and referred to by the staff as a "MR" (mental retard), a phrase that is not only offensive but inaccurate applied to Stuart, who was of normal intelligence. The story is a darkly humorous yet yearningly sad autobiographical fiction in which a disabled man (played by Stewart himself) dreams of having a relationship with a "normal" woman, and even asks her to marry him, but is rejected, and subsequently his dream of nuclear familial bliss turns into a sadistic nightmare as he becomes a serial killer/rapist of attractive young women who invariably and absurdly throw themselves at him, strangling them with his one good arm without hardly ever leaving the confines of his wheelchair.

Glover films this in the old 1.33:1 aspect ratio, with garish colors and trite dialogue, giving it the look and feel of a cheesy made-for-TV melodrama turned detective movie, but it also features graphic, nay, pornographic sex and necrophilia, with the end result approaching a sort of documentary-like X-rated fantasy. And there's a strange poignancy in the supposition that Stewart, who passed away just weeks after finishing filming, probably never had any intimate relations with women in his life except for the filming of this movie, during which he had actual sex with them on screen.

Although it's more straightforward and perhaps a touch less ambitious than What Is It?, ultimately it's a more powerful experience, due not only to the reality of the filmmaking process itself (Godard's notion that every movie is a documentary of its own creation was never more apt), but also to a smart framing device that both sparks and shatters his lofty dream, which is enough to classify it as a distant relative to certain films by David Lynch (who is set to executive produce the third installment in Glover's trilogy).

As for Glover, who attracted a memorably aggressive audience five years ago, he was in his usual, energetic, long-winded form, answering (notably less aggressive) questions that had been posed -- along with many that had not -- for hours afterward, often digressing with wonderful verbosity so as to express himself with acute clarity. He turned a question about his use of classical music, for instance, into a lengthy speech on the use of sound in cinema, which for him is primarily a visual medium, but proffered the idea that every nuanced human emotion is represented in the canon of classical music, which he knows quite well and chooses from, that most film scores are very bad, though there are exceptions such as Nino Rota's music for Fellini or Peer Raben's for Fassbinder, whose work he then proceeded to compare and contrast, along with that of Morricone, whose score for Leone's Once Upon a Time in the West, which associates specific musical pieces with individual characters, was a kind of blueprint for Everything is Fine.

At other times he would digress into memorized arguments of a political nature; for instance, stating that the United States is not a democracy, or discussing how censorship and propaganda inform the "corporately funded and distributed" media (one of his favorite token phrases). He illustrated his ideas with excerpts from Edward Bernays' Propaganda, which he suggested ought to be taught in every classroom. (Later, I sought out this book, which had a forward by Noam Chomsky, and, to make a long story short, fell down the Chomsky rabbit hole for days afterward, and now feel like I've had my blinders taken off about how the US government actually works. But I digress.)

Anyway, it was such an interesting evening that I went back the next night to see Glover's more extreme What Is It? (2005), which I had previously seen five years ago. It is not, nor is it ever likely to be available on video, as Glover believes it would be too easy for audiences to take it out of context and misrepresent the intention. And it's easy to see how that might happen when you have a cast of actors with down syndrome -- playing characters without down syndrome -- pour salt on snails and lynch a minstrel character to the heights of Wagner's operas (the occasional swastika further underscores the eugenics theme), or naked women wearing animal masks crawling out of craters on an extraterrestrial planet and giving graphic blow jobs to a man with cerebral palsy curled up in a Venus clam shell to the beat of cringe-inducingly racist folk tunes. It's not a film I can say that I like -- nor is it trying to be likable, it's intentionally confrontational with its audience -- but I admire Glover's diligence in creating and personally touring a work that is so thoughtfully offensive, determined to start a dialogue on not only the surreal nature of the work itself (in his words: his reaction to corporate oppression dictating what can and cannot be shown in the mainstream media), but on moral questions surrounding its very existence: Is this okay? Should the director have done this? What is it?
You know, if the space man puma thing turns out to be the correct religion, I for one will be very surprised.


Offline Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26218
  • Liked: 5181
  • Mr. Robot
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12873 on: June 29, 2013, 02:09:42 AM »
In honour of Richard Matheson, I watched 2 of his films last night:

Duel:  I love this movie to death.  A wonderfully tense thriller.  I could be (and hope I am) way off, but you don't see a lot of lean, simple thrillers like this anymore, where it is as simple as one guy is out to get another guy.  It's such a simple, perfect idea: someone in a car decides to stalk this other guy on the highway with his giant truck.  It's crazy tense and Dennis Weaver sells it very well (especially in the tense, Twilight Zone type moment when the main character finds something is wrong with his car in the climactic chase.  I'm willing to admit it's not Spielberg's best movie, but it may be my favourite (tied with Raiders, I think).  And it's a great movie to spring on a friend who never heard of it.

Trilogy of Terror:  Uh, I didn't grow up with this one like a lot of people but it's not so great.  On the plus side, it does act as a nice showcase for Karen Black (who I think did a good job), but the first too stories are both forgettable and cliche.  The first one kind of bothers me.  I feel like the twist should have worked, but it's kind of weird that it's really about a woman's plot to get raped and kill her rapist.  I think you can do it, but it's hard to pull off without getting any icky gender issues.  The second one is more cliche and it was easy to see the twist from the beginning.  The third one is, as Krusty the Klown would say, the money melon.  This is the one with the Zuni Fetish Doll (AKA He Who Kills) and is a lot like Duel, in that Matheson had mastered writing stories with minimal dialogue (which must be hard from a screenwriting standpoint).  For the most part, it is not quite as scary as people remember, but the first bit when we know the doll is around the apartment but he can't be seen is crazy tense.  The other stuff fun too, but I think the made for TV music robs it of a lot of it's power.  Still, it is scary and funny (I love that this killer doll story presents a very different killer doll that feels like a Looney Toons character while still being scary.  The end also is very strong but is marred a bit by a "dun dun DUUUUN!" musical sting.  Still, pretty cool and surprisingly bloody for made for TV (although most of the wounds are pretty shallow).


Offline Edward J Grug III

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 16242
  • Liked: 2648
  • Forum Tokens Collected: 5000
    • Glorious Bounty
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12874 on: June 29, 2013, 02:59:57 AM »
Duel:  I love this movie to death.  A wonderfully tense thriller.  I could be (and hope I am) way off, but you don't see a lot of lean, simple thrillers like this anymore, where it is as simple as one guy is out to get another guy.  It's such a simple, perfect idea: someone in a car decides to stalk this other guy on the highway with his giant truck.  It's crazy tense and Dennis Weaver sells it very well (especially in the tense, Twilight Zone type moment when the main character finds something is wrong with his car in the climactic chase.  I'm willing to admit it's not Spielberg's best movie, but it may be my favourite (tied with Raiders, I think).  And it's a great movie to spring on a friend who never heard of it.

I also love Duel! I was just telling my wife that wished it would come to Blu Ray.
FINE


Offline Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26218
  • Liked: 5181
  • Mr. Robot
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12875 on: June 29, 2013, 06:00:56 AM »
The Comedy of Terrors

Another Richard Matheson, but it doesn't feel like it (of course, I'm not that familiar with his Roger Corman work).  It feels like Burke and Hare as viewed through the lens of Harvey Kurtzman (the drunken boorish characters, the buxom females) which is pretty neat.  As a film, it feels halfway good.  The cast is pretty great (Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, Basil Rathbone and Boris Karloff) and the idea of these actors working in a comedy is pretty great.  And they are all game for it, though some work better than others.  They are mostly all one note, but you can tell while they are all giving it, Vincent Price seems most at home.  Peter Lorre has played some comedic villains in noirs, but here, I kind of wish he had more of a present.  Kind of a neat, fun movie, but pretty disposable.  It might have worked better as three short comedies rather than just the longer story.


Offline Sugar Ray Dodge

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1560
  • Liked: 541
    • Utah Graphics World
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12876 on: June 29, 2013, 06:08:47 AM »
Saw Star Trek Into Darkness one last time the other night before it bailed out of first run theaters.


Offline Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 28122
  • Liked: 5896
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12877 on: June 29, 2013, 08:02:12 PM »
Finally got around to watching Moon, which I have been hearing nothing but praise about ever since it's debut. Honestly, I didn't care for it much. Sam Rockwell's performance is excellent. And it's worth seeing once for him. But for a movie that is "smart sci fi", I had too many problems with it.

I'll put it in spoilers since it's all related to the "twist" although considering that happens 30 minutes in, not sure if it really counts as that.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

And I've heard people praising Kevin Spacey's performance as Gerty. Bullshit. It's a calm, monotone, robot voice. He's fine at it, but there's nothing behind it, there's no emotion, no threat, no nothing. I didn't buy it when people claimed there was more to the HAL voice in 2001, and I don't buy it here.

It's a shame, because really smart sci fi is few and far between these days, and I had high hopes for this.



Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Not Quite Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11763
  • Liked: 2657
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12878 on: June 29, 2013, 09:19:09 PM »
Spoiler (click to show/hide)


Not sure spoilers are needed but since you used them:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)


Offline Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26218
  • Liked: 5181
  • Mr. Robot
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12879 on: June 30, 2013, 06:45:56 PM »
The Legend of Hell House

In remembrance of Richard Matheson, this is the last movie I watched for the weekend (though I do having the Incredible Shrinking Man waiting for me), the Legend of Hell House is one of the best Haunted House movies.  It does have some weaknesses (there are 2 plot twists and one of them makes sense but is not very good and the other is clever, but not mind blowing), but Roddy McDowell is fantastic and I like what it says about both science and religion and that perhaps they are both strong methods to an answer and misplaced faith in either can lead you astray.  Roddy's character wants to sort of be deteched from both, but you really can just detach from the world so easily.  Very great, and it was one of the inspirations my second favourite fake trailer from Grindhouse, after Machete.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/1sJhdMwOtRU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/1sJhdMwOtRU</a>
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/pKzW1nxpWI0" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/pKzW1nxpWI0</a>
It's funny, there's been talk of Thanksgiving and even She Wolves being made into real films a la Machete, but THIS is the movie I want to be real.


Offline Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 28122
  • Liked: 5896
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12880 on: June 30, 2013, 09:43:13 PM »
Bigfoot - The 2012 Asylum movie with the 30 foot sasquatch and starring Danny Bonaduce and Barry Williams. This movie was fun as hell!
  Unlike a lot of Asylum movies, they don't skimp on the CGI monster. You see him a lot. And while it is bad CG, and it's not interacting with the live action well at all, that just adds to the hilarity.
  Most importantly, this movie is having fun, and knows it's silly. It doesn't wink at the camera or anything, but they clearly know we came to see sasquatch mess shit up, and he does.
  Seriously, this thing kicks, slashes, steps on people, punts cars, fucking EATS people, and all around don't take no shit from nobody! No real downtime in the furry mayhem, either, like we usually get in Asylum movies. From moment one we see the Bigfoot, and not ten minutes go by without more action.
  Oh, and when I said "starring Danny Bonaduce and Barry Williams", that's what I meant! There's no annoying bland teenybopper main characters. Nope, Danny Bonaduce and Barry Williams are the main characters! The female sheriff isn't even some hot blond we're can't take seriously. She's Sherilyn Fenn from Twin Peaks, who looks like an average middle-aged woman now. Hell, nobody in this movie is below thirty, most much older than that.



Offline MSTJedi

  • Climbed El Capitan
  • *******
  • Posts: 5037
  • Liked: 604
  • In a not too distant future far, far away. . . .
    • Facebook
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12881 on: July 01, 2013, 01:14:41 PM »
Bigfoot - The 2012 Asylum movie with the 30 foot sasquatch and starring Danny Bonaduce and Barry Williams. This movie was fun as hell!
  Unlike a lot of Asylum movies, they don't skimp on the CGI monster. You see him a lot. And while it is bad CG, and it's not interacting with the live action well at all, that just adds to the hilarity.
  Most importantly, this movie is having fun, and knows it's silly. It doesn't wink at the camera or anything, but they clearly know we came to see sasquatch mess shit up, and he does.
  Seriously, this thing kicks, slashes, steps on people, punts cars, fucking EATS people, and all around don't take no shit from nobody! No real downtime in the furry mayhem, either, like we usually get in Asylum movies. From moment one we see the Bigfoot, and not ten minutes go by without more action.
  Oh, and when I said "starring Danny Bonaduce and Barry Williams", that's what I meant! There's no annoying bland teenybopper main characters. Nope, Danny Bonaduce and Barry Williams are the main characters! The female sheriff isn't even some hot blond we're can't take seriously. She's Sherilyn Fenn from Twin Peaks, who looks like an average middle-aged woman now. Hell, nobody in this movie is below thirty, most much older than that.

I gotta see this now.



Offline Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 28122
  • Liked: 5896
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12882 on: July 01, 2013, 04:07:19 PM »
Bigfoot - The 2012 Asylum movie with the 30 foot sasquatch and starring Danny Bonaduce and Barry Williams. This movie was fun as hell!
  Unlike a lot of Asylum movies, they don't skimp on the CGI monster. You see him a lot. And while it is bad CG, and it's not interacting with the live action well at all, that just adds to the hilarity.
  Most importantly, this movie is having fun, and knows it's silly. It doesn't wink at the camera or anything, but they clearly know we came to see sasquatch mess shit up, and he does.
  Seriously, this thing kicks, slashes, steps on people, punts cars, fucking EATS people, and all around don't take no shit from nobody! No real downtime in the furry mayhem, either, like we usually get in Asylum movies. From moment one we see the Bigfoot, and not ten minutes go by without more action.
  Oh, and when I said "starring Danny Bonaduce and Barry Williams", that's what I meant! There's no annoying bland teenybopper main characters. Nope, Danny Bonaduce and Barry Williams are the main characters! The female sheriff isn't even some hot blond we're can't take seriously. She's Sherilyn Fenn from Twin Peaks, who looks like an average middle-aged woman now. Hell, nobody in this movie is below thirty, most much older than that.

I gotta see this now.
It's on Netflix Instant.



Offline Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 28122
  • Liked: 5896
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12883 on: July 01, 2013, 09:28:06 PM »
Watched Despicable Me again. First time since it was in theaters. I remember liking it more back then. Now, it's just...cute. Very light, and didn't even have a lot of big laughs in it. It's only really fun and interesting when Gru is away from the little girls. Who are, admittedly, aggressively cute, and their part is kinda heartwarming. But from the moment they are introduced you know EVERY single solitary step of the cliché plotline they are going to do throughout the movie. And more importantly, they only serve to take Gru away from what makes him interesting, the villainy and in particular the rivalry between him and Vector.
  I never understood, if he can make stuff like cookie robots, why not robotic girls, or just dress some of his minions up as girls scouts to sell the cookies? Thereby eliminating the need for them in the story at all. Their inclusion just feels very forced, is all.
  Still, it's not bad. And I have high hopes for the sequel. As this is definitely one that could be improved upon with the typical sequel "bigger and more exciting".
  Megamind was MUCH better. Although admittedly that one was trying for more of a comic book-y action feel, and this one clearly isn't.



Offline Sugar Ray Dodge

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1560
  • Liked: 541
    • Utah Graphics World
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12884 on: July 01, 2013, 10:09:37 PM »
If anybody hasn't seen The Conspirator, I highly recommend it. Princess Buttercup is awesome.