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Author Topic: What was the last movie you watched?  (Read 1523196 times)

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Offline Tripe

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12495 on: March 17, 2013, 05:55:56 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/JH8KxCqkPf0" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/JH8KxCqkPf0</a>

Caesar Must Die is an odd hybrid of a movie; mostly starring convicts at an Italian maximum security prison, it shows the preparation and performance of Shakespeare's  Julius Caesar in translation and how that changes the cast of the play. At the same time it also presents an abridged version of the play and scenes that were likely not scripted but improvised around the scenes of the play.

Odd however isn't a synonym for bad, this was one of the most fascinating works of film I've seen in a long while, I'm always interested in how drama can reach and be received by those who have trouble in their lives and a friend of mine is currently running a similar project in Michigan (go, read her blog, it's great), which made this naturally of interest to me.

It's very short at an hour and a quarter and seems shorter, it's really worth giving it a look if you can.


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12496 on: March 17, 2013, 06:18:05 PM »
Some people on another forum were talking about Transmorphers being one of the worst movies ever.  So I tried to watch it on Netflix.  No way I could keep myself from hitting the fast forward button, it's not the good kind of bad, as far as I could tell every time I skipped ahead it was the same, so nothing happens until some kind of battle at the end and even that is so boring it's not funny.  Only minor chuckle were the flying snowmobile like things near the end done on bad green screen.  I don't believe it is even riffable since it's 90+% people standing around in various dark rooms talking.


Offline Darth Geek

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12497 on: March 17, 2013, 06:37:14 PM »
Yeah, Transmorphers is pretty bad. But not the worst of The Asylum. I still say that's Monster, their Cloverfield ripoff.



Online The Lurker

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12498 on: March 17, 2013, 06:59:39 PM »
For me it was their attempt at making an epic fantasy movie, Dragonquest.  Not even Marc Singer (or even the guy that happened to look like a variation on Mirror Universe Spock) could save it.  It was just weak and dull.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2013, 07:23:25 PM by The Lurker »


Offline Charles Castle

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12499 on: March 18, 2013, 02:18:37 PM »
The 400 Blows (1959, Francois Truffaut) is probably Truffaut's best film: it espouses a sense of freedom and anti-establishment politics through a visual style that perfectly weds realism and lyricism, without ever becoming annoying, as so many of his later movies tend to become. To be sure, there's a playful, juvenile sensibility in places, but in this case it feels appropriate to the subject matter, and it's also tempered by more serious social concerns. There are so many great images in this film, and  as I hadn't seen it in probably 12 years, I had forgotten most of them. There's the image of Antoine Doinel, cold and ravished with hunger, gulping a stolen milk bottle in hiding, sucking at the proverbial breast, as it were, yet in a damp, dark world that is a poor replacement for his problematic mother. Or the shots from his perspective, looking out the gated police van, at the world of glittery freedom receding from him, recalling that wonderful shot of Harry Lime's fingers reaching through the sewer. But my favorite image is something of a meta-image. Not the famous freeze frame at the end, right after he breaks the fourth wall and looks at the camera, but the earlier scene in which he goes on the amusement park ride that spins him around and around, holding him in place via centripetal force. It's this image of Doinel, wallowing in a last gasp of childhood innocence, that resembles a zoetrope, that great precursor to cinema, evoked so cleverly here that it's touching: a celebration of cinema and childhood, of the childhood of cinema, at once. Beautiful.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2013, 02:20:47 PM by Charles Hussein Castle »
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Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12500 on: March 18, 2013, 03:25:56 PM »
I've been strongly considering picking up the Criterion blu-ray of The 400 Blows (having never seen the film before), now that we can watch US coded BR. I think my next order will be Kiss Me Deadly, Breathless and The Wages of Fear though...
« Last Edit: March 18, 2013, 03:37:32 PM by Edward J Grug III »
FINE


Offline mrbasehart

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12501 on: March 18, 2013, 05:09:13 PM »
I've seen a smattering of films in the past few days -

Romantics Anonymous is a lovely little French comedy about two emotionally repressed people who come together when the woman - an adorable Isabelle Carre - applies for a job at the man's chocolate factory.  It's set in the fantasy of Paris that's seen in films like Amelie, so it's in no way a realistic film, but that doesn't make it any less engaging or charming.

Ted has all the hallmarks of Seth MacFarlane's previous works and while it fails in certain areas - Joel McHale's character isn't particularly funny and the "thriller" aspects aren't especially interesting - it manages to get the central pairing of Mark Wahlberg's character and his Teddy Bear just right, embuing it with an unexpected emotional weight that's missing from almost anything else MacFarlane does.  Add in one of the coolest ladies to appear in recent years - Mila Kunis - and you have a pretty good, very adult, comedy.

Sleepwalk with Me is based on stand-up comedian Mike Birbiglia's own life and feels more like a confessional than an actual movie, with direct to camera pieces that feel like a diary more than fiction.  He plays an emotionally timid man who's afraid to leave or commit to his girlfriend (Six Feet Under's Lauren Ambrose, mainly the reason I watched it) and uses both that fear and desire to become a better comedian, at the expense of his relationship.  I didn't find it that funny, but I didn't hate it either.  Birbiglia's not unlikeable, but his dithering is a little tiresome, especially when it seems like his girlfriend is so awesome.

Pitch Perfect - Speaking of awesome, here's this spiky comedy about a college freshman (the enormously talent Anna Kendrick) who joins an all female a capella group upon the insistence of her father and becomes involved in their bid to win the national a capella championships.  It's funny, has great female characters, and some really cool musical performances.  It's the sort of film you hope your daughter would love, because it means you're doing something right.


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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12502 on: March 19, 2013, 03:45:15 AM »
The 400 Blows is brilliant, but I've always had a great affection for Day For Night

Anyhoo, thought I'd drop in over here and share my recent viewings.

I've been watching several from one of my favorites, Luis Buñuel – mostly from his Mexican era. While I gravitate more toward his free-form surrealism (Phantom of Liberty, L'Age d'Or, Belle de Jour) his rather grounded work from this era was equally as incredible.

I’m amazed how he could address the same issues, show same images (he sure loved feet!) and explore the same ideas film after film, and still manage to make them fresh and compelling viewing time and time again.

I also always read the reviews after viewing because they are entertaining as well. Buñuel offered such complexities that you find something different in just about every write-up. Everyone has an interesting idea on what it all means.

I watched...

Nazarin - pure genius, one of the directors finest, about a Priest who suffers all manner of trial as he attempts to do God’s will. And that ending, wow – but what does it mean? (Opinions vary)

The Young One - an obscure film, one of only 2 he made in English. On its surface it's about racism and pedophilia, but underneath that there are observations about the ineffectiveness of the Church and the nature of man (which is no more elevated than any other animal). Difficult – challenging - while it appears overall simplistic at first glance, it is incredibly detailed. Every shot is meaningful, no matter how mundane they might appear. Another stunner.

Él – not my favorite, but still a good one. About obsession, jealousy and paranoia. The final act was very strong: The imagery as the guy loses it in the Church, the final shot of his strange walk - indicating that he’s been deluding himself that God has cured him.


and now I have The Criminal Life of Archibaldo de la Cruz next on the docket, and then I'm going to jump to Tristana which I have on order.

Oh, and my favorite Buñuel of all time is Viridiana
« Last Edit: March 19, 2013, 04:04:23 AM by George Harrison »


Offline Space version 2.0

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12503 on: March 19, 2013, 09:11:09 AM »

Sleepwalk with Me is based on stand-up comedian Mike Birbiglia's own life and feels more like a confessional than an actual movie, with direct to camera pieces that feel like a diary more than fiction.  He plays an emotionally timid man who's afraid to leave or commit to his girlfriend (Six Feet Under's Lauren Ambrose, mainly the reason I watched it) and uses both that fear and desire to become a better comedian, at the expense of his relationship.  I didn't find it that funny, but I didn't hate it either.  Birbiglia's not unlikeable, but his dithering is a little tiresome, especially when it seems like his girlfriend is so awesome.

His stand up is a lot funnier, especially the album this is based off of.
Kristen Schaal was perfectly cast though.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2013, 09:23:48 AM by Space version 2.0 »


Offline Mrs. Dick Courier

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12504 on: March 19, 2013, 07:16:43 PM »
Pride and Prejudice with Colin Firth.  While eating a greek pizza.  Life is good.
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Offline Charles Castle

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12505 on: March 20, 2013, 12:53:34 PM »
I've been strongly considering picking up the Criterion blu-ray of The 400 Blows (having never seen the film before), now that we can watch US coded BR. I think my next order will be Kiss Me Deadly, Breathless and The Wages of Fear though...
The Kiss Me Deadly Blu Ray is essential. It represents the biggest improvement in quality from previous releases of any of the others you mentioned.
You know, if the space man puma thing turns out to be the correct religion, I for one will be very surprised.


Offline Charles Castle

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12506 on: March 20, 2013, 01:22:33 PM »
I had a blast watching The African Queen (1951, John Huston) the other day, restored on the big screen in all its Technicolor glory. This was one of the few remaining "bonafide classics" I had never before seen, and as far as I'm concerned it rivals the best of Huston's work. The ridiculous quest for the holy grail, which consumes the characters in most every Huston film, is pared down here to just a man, a woman, a boat, and a river. The minimalism of the adventure really allows the characterizations to flourish, and as exciting as it is to see these two battle every hurdle in the book mother nature can throw their way down this impossible river, it's even more fun watching them break down their own barriers and embrace one another. The romance, which could so easily be forced by the situation, evolves naturally, without the sense that the characters are being goaded into it. That's largely due to the performances of Bogart and Hepburn, both getting along in age but still at the top of their game, acting wise. Bogart in particular pulls out a grimy performance I didn't think he even had in him. And I love the twist of fate that marks the end. In any other movie, it might seem like a cheap ploy, but seen within the larger context of Huston's output, it's but the continuation of a motif that stresses the journey is more important than the destination. It's a grand adventure, the kind that makes you want to set off on some great excursion of your own.

********

I originally saw The Terminator (1984, directed by James Cameron) the night it opened. I saw it with my older brother, who was quite the enabler when I was a kid. He mainly wanted to see action, and I can't say that I didn't want the same, but I knew that this was made by the guy who made Piranha II: The Spawning, which we had endured a few months before on cable, so I just prayed that it wouldn't suck too much. I mean, really, a movie starring Arnold Schwarzenegger (fresh from Conan the Destroyer) as a killer robot? I think we probably came out of the movie looking like we had been hit in the forehead by a two by four. This is a movie that laid the lumber to the audience like no other film in the marketplace at the time. It was unrelenting. I can even pinpoint the spot where I knew the movie was going to kick my ass: the scene where the terminator pops his eyeball out with an X-acto knife, revealing the electronic eye behind it.

In any event, I hadn't seen the movie in over a decade. Some perspective creeps in with time. One thing that is immediately apparent in retrospect is how much the "look" of the film is in line with other sci fi exploitation films from the same period. It looks very similar to Escape from New York or Galaxy of Terror, and, of course, there's a reason for this. This look was more or less authored by Jim Cameron when he was working as a special effects man. The other thing that I noticed about the movie was how bad the performances by its principles are. Both Michael Biehn and Linda Hamilton are servicable and both of them are blown off the screen by Schwarzenegger, in spite of the fact that Arnold has a mere 16 lines of dialogue (the film, for me, is arguably stolen by two cameos: the redoubtable Dick Miller as a gun shop owner and Bill Paxton as a punk). It's also apparent that much of the film's forward motion is the result of creative editing, rather than elaborate set-pieces, a nod to the paucity of resources available to the filmmakers.

The arc of the movie's plot has the most in common with slasher movies: we have an unstoppable killer rampaging through the cast until we are left with only the final girl to confront him. There's even a hint of the moral universe of the slasher movie when Sarah Connor's slutty roommate and her boyfriend are killed by the terminator. Thematically, however, the movie most resembles Frankenstein, which Isaac Asimov once described as the story of a robot that turns on its creator. From a purely cinematic point of view, the lumbering injured terminator at the end of the movie recalls the Monster from the old Universal Frankensteins (especially Son of Frankenstein), and the electrical effects throughout the movie should be a dead giveaway. To an extent, this is the living end of the Frankenstein story, in which our creation and our hubris brings about a heavy metal apocalypse. And this, more than any other element of the movie, is what strikes a chord.
You know, if the space man puma thing turns out to be the correct religion, I for one will be very surprised.


Offline Mrs. Dick Courier

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12507 on: March 20, 2013, 04:04:18 PM »
The Perks of Being a Wallflower

I read the book this was based on years ago, remember liking it, but didn't remember anything about it.

This movie was written by the original author and I really enjoyed it.  Good cast, Emma Watson is good, and beautiful.  And the boy that plays Patrick is really good.
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Offline lassieface

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12508 on: March 20, 2013, 04:59:56 PM »
Thor

Really enjoyed it. Yes, they over-used the Dutch angle to the extreme, but it still liked it. It also played the funny parts really well. Definitely interested in seeing the sequel now.


Offline Kete

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12509 on: March 21, 2013, 08:27:06 AM »
Dredd
Okay, that was actually really good.  I was pleasantly surprised.  It was great to finally see one of these reboot movies actually be good and enough from the different from the original to justify making it (I'm looking at you Total Recall, Red Dawn, Footloose.....).  It was very similar to The Raid, but it's hard to fault either movie because I'm sure they were both in production at the same time.  I would say that The Raid is a better movie, but Dredd is more accessible.  I could have done with either less or more gore, but this amount is the amount I don't like (when they actually try to be serious about it).  Anyway, it was well worth it.

Predators
The first movie since the original that was worth watching, although it was very predictable.  I was able to pick out the order of deaths at the very beginning of the movie.  I did think the ethnic mix of characters was a little silly.  It bothered me that the Yakuza guy was good with a Samurai sword.  That's like saying I'm good with a lasso because I'm American.  Overall it was pretty decent, though.  I would watch another one if they made it.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2013, 08:29:37 AM by Kete »