Author Topic: What was the last movie you watched?  (Read 1584538 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Tripe

  • Stars in Musicals
  • *
  • Posts: 41553
  • Liked: 9932
  • Very dapper
    • Nick Rowley, Voice Artist
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12315 on: January 20, 2013, 02:28:46 PM »
Beast of the Southern Wild: There really is much to commend the film; the filming is lovely in parts the performances are great (especially from the Father who I don't think has been recognised for said performance, which is a shame) but if I were to sum up my reaction to the piece in one word, that word would be Yikes.


Online Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26230
  • Liked: 5185
  • Mr. Robot
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12316 on: January 20, 2013, 03:13:35 PM »
The Miserables

Never read the source material but found it to be very entertaining.  I like how the story is really antithetical to the Count of Monte Cristo; a prisoner escapes, gets wealthy from a kindly old man but uses his new identity to be completely selfless.  Hugh Jackman, Anne Hathaway and Sacha Baron Cohen are stand outs and though maybe not being that familiar with musical theatre, but I wasn't as bothered as most by Russell Crowe.  Maybe because he was built to be such an awful miscast.  I thought he did a serviceable job in a role suited to someone much better.  I get the feeling that his style of singing just wasn't appropriate, though.  I can hear a rock and roll voice trying to be reigned into a musical voice.  Still, even when played weakly, Javert is definitely a fascinating character.

BTW, did anyone think that as he got older, Hugh Jackman's eyes were similar to Joe Flaherty?  That's weird.


Gunflyer

  • Guest
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12317 on: January 20, 2013, 05:21:42 PM »
Airport 1975 is a solid disaster movie that I found to be both tense and exciting. I think I should explain that in disaster movies part of the human drama is that when characters die, it's played not for entertainment value, but intended to make you feel sad, and in effect a part of the disaster spectacle before your eyes. The point isn't just to shock you, it's to touch your sense of humanity. As annoying and cliche many of the Airport characters are, I do like them in some sense. In this film, there is a mid-air collision between a 747 and a single engine plane that renders the pilot, co-pilot and communications officer either dead or incapacitated. I did enjoy the chemistry between Charleton Heston and George Kennedy(Which was also taken advantage of in the previous year's "Earthquake"), and it was a pretty tense ride because while today Planes can practically land themselves, even in the fairly misogynistic seventies, most women wouldn't even trust the stewardess to land the plane. I think it was just as solid as the original Airport, though perhaps not as in depth a film.

Airport '77is about some criminals intent on pillaging valuable cargo on board a civilian airline. Why is such valuable cargo aboard a civillian plane without added security? All I can tell you is that it was the naive, trusting 1970's. This time, JC from Sidehackers and some other schmucks plunder the cargo, planning to land on an Island air strip somewhere in the Bermuda Triangle. Unfortunately... they forget that water isn't a very good substitute for a landing strip and the buffoon criminals encounter a healthy dose of poetic justice and die upon impact while the passengers and crew eventually wake up to find their plane.... underwater. The cast also includes Christopher Lee, Jack Lemmon, James Stewart, and of course Brenda Vaccaro(Because it's not a movie without Brenda Vaccaro). Again, it's a solid entry in the franchise... not great... not bad either. It's the type of movie you watch when you're flipping channels and you're like "Oh sweet! I haven't seen this in ages!"

Airport '79: The Concorde is called the black sheep of the series? I actually liked it quite a bit. It was still pretty tense and exciting, but a bit jarring when the plane lands, completely averting disaster, only to find that the
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
. I guess that's what put many people off the film. The performances aren't bad. They're certainly no worse than those found in the original Airport film... except that George Kennedy isn't really played to full, colorful effect. Also, in an interesting twist...
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
, and I actually kind of like that.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

« Last Edit: January 20, 2013, 05:56:17 PM by Russell »


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Not Quite Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11766
  • Liked: 2660
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12318 on: January 20, 2013, 07:33:15 PM »
Airport 1975 is a solid disaster movie that I found to be both tense and exciting.

The "incident" during the air to air rescue scene gives me the creeps just thinking about it....


Offline Charles Castle

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 878
  • Liked: 528
  • I crap bigger than this movie.
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12319 on: January 20, 2013, 10:04:39 PM »
Aw, Who Mourns wasn't a bad ep.
What? Shun! :D

It ranks low on the list for me. There is some line about Palamas finding the right man and leaving the service that makes me cringe every time. Also, Scotty's weird obsession with Palamas is out of nowhere, and he seems like a totally different character. Why not make Apollo at least a bit like the character from literature?

Decent idea but poor execution, to me.

I'm making my way through all the Trek films in random order. Probably a bad idea if I'm going to compare components of one versus another, but I can say I felt the set design, effects and the score in 5 were superior to those in 4.
You know, if the space man puma thing turns out to be the correct religion, I for one will be very surprised.


Offline lassieface

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1378
  • Liked: 250
  • Stuff is fun n' stuff!
    • Striped Tea Cup
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12320 on: January 20, 2013, 11:08:59 PM »
Django Unchained

I'm a Tarantino fan, so I loved it. That man can write...and direct.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)


Offline Tripe

  • Stars in Musicals
  • *
  • Posts: 41553
  • Liked: 9932
  • Very dapper
    • Nick Rowley, Voice Artist
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12321 on: January 21, 2013, 07:58:16 AM »
Plus, he ties in nicely with Pratchett's concept of gods needing worshipers.
Well, Maya Deren's.*

Love Who Mourns..., it's probably my favourite episode (though Squire... is up there too). :)

* Though it might not be hers either; I think she's where he got it from however, especially since there is a bit in Wintersmith which is almost verbatim from Divine Horsemen in regards to the process of evolution into godhead.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2013, 08:03:41 AM by Tripe H. Redux »


Offline Mrs. Dick Courier

  • The FBI Pays Me to Surf
  • *
  • Posts: 2096
  • Liked: 1204
  • keeping an eye on the sammich since 1993
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12322 on: January 21, 2013, 04:23:45 PM »
Pitch Perfect

I enjoyed it.  Who would have ever thought I would enjoy a movie about acapella singing?

The idea is generic comedy movie.  But the music is good, and the acting good.  I laughed aloud at many points.

Opticians are easy on the eyes


Offline Kete

  • Dragon Ryder
  • ***
  • Posts: 6587
  • Liked: 3569
  • All joking a salad.
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12323 on: January 21, 2013, 10:04:52 PM »
Austenland
Very funny, but predictable. Bret MacKenzie is hilarious as always. Jennifer Coolidge does her typical role, but still funny with her improv chops. The movie's not as quirky as Napoleon Dynamite, which is probably a good thing.


Offline losingmydignity

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1253
  • Liked: 307
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12324 on: January 21, 2013, 10:15:43 PM »
El Topo.

Well, I finally got to this one. Didn't like it at all. The images just didn't do anything for me. Not intriguing in any way and I usually love trippy movies (big fan of the Monkee's Head, Zappa's Motels, Lynch's Erasermotels and Elephantheads).


Offline Charles Castle

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 878
  • Liked: 528
  • I crap bigger than this movie.
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12325 on: January 23, 2013, 12:12:11 AM »
It's usually taken as a given that Star Trek films from II to IV form a kind of a trilogy, but upon revisiting Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country(directed by Nicholas Meyer), it becomes clear that that's not technically true. It is rather, a quartet. The Undiscovered Country acts as a capstone to the story begun by director Nicholas Meyer in The Wrath of Khan in a way that Star Trek IV does not. It resolves, among other things, Kirk's lifelong enmity with the Klingons, Spock's struggle with his human half, and the Federation's culture of perpetual war (long an odd element of a future envisioned as humankind on the advance). Like many Star Trek projects, this film is an allegory. Unlike some of Star Trek's other allegories, this one refrains from preaching by virtue including too many other interesting elements to distract the audience. It's a political thriller, a submarine movie, a prison movie, and a whodunit all rolled into one. This all serves the film as a clever disguise. It's also the most cinematically interesting Star Trek movie since the first one. Or, hell, maybe including the first one.

The story here finds the moon where the Klingons manufacture most of their energy exploding at the outset of the movie, creating a humanitarian crisis for the Federation. Spock, at his father's request, has opened a dialogue with the head of the Klingon high command, Chancellor Gorkon, with an opportunity to declare an end to seventy years of hostility between the Federation and the Empire. Unfortunately, there are those on both sides of the Neutral Zone who would prefer a continuing state of war, and many in the Federation who feel that the Klingons can never be trusted. Kirk, still mourning the murder of his son in the third movie, is among the doubters. When Spock volunteers Kirk and the Enterprise as ambassadors to the peace talks, Kirk demures. "Only Nixon can go to China," Spock quips. "They are dying." Kirk replies: "Let them die."

The rest of the movie concerns an assassination plot aimed at Gorkon, and then at the head of the Federation at the peace talks. The Enterprise is framed for the murder of Gorkon, for which Kirk takes the fall as Spock and the crew race to uncover the true assassins. Kirk, for his part, is transported to a Klingon prison planet after a kangaroo show trial. He escapes, the conspirators are uncovered, and the plot is foiled in the end. I think I can safely give away the end of this movie. Does anyone really think that our heroes will fail in the end?

What's really interesting about this movie is the way it turns Kirk into Ethan Edwards. Kirk is certainly a John Wayne-ish part anyway, but this turn of events is a specific echo of Wayne's racist hero in The Searchers. Like Edwards, Kirk is a hero in spite of his racism. Part of his heroism in the movie is in overcoming that racism and doing the right thing. Kirk's inner turmoil here is actually well-handled even if the other racial allegories are ham-fisted. "Guess who's coming to dinner," quips Chekov, in one of the film's more obvious references. But before the whole thing becomes choked with its own self-importance, the game, as they say, is afoot and the film turns Sherlockian for a while. Then into a political thrills. And then the naval battle. One even forgets the racial allegory for a while, even as the political allegory (about the end of the Cold War) comes fully to the fore. In any event, it's a film that doesn't stop long enough to be pinned down.

This is the first film in the series that really thinks through its shot compositions in anything more than a strictly utilitarian manner. The blocking of scenes is important in this movie. This shot, for instance, shows the distance the film's plot puts between Kirk and Spock:



While the sequence where this shot occurs spins around Spock and Valeris in a slow, dizzy approximation of the way Spock rapes Valeris's brain to get the information he needs. It's one of the darkest scenes in Star Trek:



Star Trek VI also succeeds where the previous three films failed. It provides the audience with memorable villains. Christopher Plummer is a barnstormer as the Klingon general, Chiang. Nicholas Meyer lets the actor chew the scenery with relish after acquiescing to his request to forgo the hair piece that most Klingon's wear. Of all the Klingons who have crossed the big screen in the various Star Trek movies, Plummer is the one that stands out as an arch villain. It doesn't hurt that he's a Bardolator, spouting Shakespeare all through the movie. This is a honey glazed ham of a performance. Kim Cattrall, on the other hand, is much more subtle as Valeris, the traitorous Vulcan. Cattrall asked that the name "Eris" be worked into her name somehow, as both a signal of her true calling, and as a clue hidden in plain sight. Poe would have been proud. Meyer is canny about placing Valeris in interesting positions throughout the movie as a kind of gamesmanship with the plot, especially given that the early audiences would not ordinarily suspect that one of the villains was a Vulcan officer on the bridge of the Enterprise. It's a marvelous bit of misdirection. The audience is busy watching Plummer as Cattrall worms her way under the skin.

Star Trek VI accomplishes at least one other thing. It allows the original cast the dignity of going out in style, in a legitimately good movie, rather than as laughingstocks in Shatner's vanity Trek. The cast deserved better than that ignominious fate, and this movie voids that indignity. This film feels very much like a valediction. When, at the end of the movie, Shatner/Kirk give the order to head for "The second star to the right, and straight on 'til morning," it's the send-off the original crew deserves.



« Last Edit: January 23, 2013, 12:16:01 AM by Charles Hussein Castle »
You know, if the space man puma thing turns out to be the correct religion, I for one will be very surprised.


Offline ScottotD

  • Not Quite Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11158
  • Liked: 1269
  • E Pluribum Anus forever
    • Facebook
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12326 on: January 23, 2013, 02:15:15 AM »
Do you have a blog?
Scottotd on Instagram

"A thing I like that there was no chance would ever continue until recently is now continuing but it doesn't meet my exact personal specifications so fuck this"

- how I read any complaint about MST3k (or Star Wars or Ghostbusters)


Offline Mrs. Dick Courier

  • The FBI Pays Me to Surf
  • *
  • Posts: 2096
  • Liked: 1204
  • keeping an eye on the sammich since 1993
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12327 on: January 23, 2013, 11:45:25 AM »
Made in Heaven

An old 80's movie starring Tim Hutton as a young man who dies attempting to save a drowning family.  He goes to heaven and falls in love with Kelly McGillis.  But she is reincarnated and he makes a deal with an angel to be reincarnated himself.  But he only has 30 years to find her.

Typical 80s romance.  I liked it though.  On a side noteTom Petty, Ric Ocasek and Neil Young are all in this movie.  Why you ask?  I wonder at that myself

My Week with Marilyn

Michelle Williams is really good as Marilyn Monroe in this.  It's about the filming of the Prince and the Showgirl.  A young assistant director strikes up a friendship with Ms. Monroe.

The rest of the cast is good too.  Kenneth Brannagh, Judi Dench, and even Emma Watson.
Opticians are easy on the eyes


Offline anais.butterfly

  • The FBI Pays Me to Surf
  • *
  • Posts: 2800
  • Liked: 1382
  • Monkey Brains!
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12328 on: January 23, 2013, 02:17:40 PM »
My Week with Marilyn

Michelle Williams is really good as Marilyn Monroe in this.  It's about the filming of the Prince and the Showgirl.  A young assistant director strikes up a friendship with Ms. Monroe.

The rest of the cast is good too.  Kenneth Brannagh, Judi Dench, and even Emma Watson.


The guy who plays Marius in the new Les Mis is in that movie (if I remember correctly), so I really want to see it....he's dreamy
Anais is the Coolest Butterfly I know  ;D


Offline RoninFox

  • Gryffindork
  • ******
  • Posts: 14021
  • Liked: 2386
    • Ronin Fox Trax
Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12329 on: January 23, 2013, 02:21:53 PM »
Little Shop of Horrors: Director's Cut

After hearing about it for years, the original ending of the Frank Oz film was released fully restored and remastered and I grabbed it on blu ray.  If you don't know, there were some major changes to the film from the original script and what was shot.  If you've ever seen the musical performed live or the Roger Corman original film you know what I'm talking about.

Now for a ridiculous spoiler about a decades old film.  Whether you read it or not...watch the movie when you can.  If you liked any version of the story or you have any love for practical special effects and puppeteering, see this thing.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
RoninFoxTrax Presents Rocky

gum.co/RFTrocky