Author Topic: What was the last movie you watched?  (Read 1585661 times)

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Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18495 on: February 20, 2019, 05:18:46 PM »
Yes, cartoonish I can watch, stuff like Kill Bill, I've never seen more than clips of the Saw movies but they look like torture porn to me.
Something like Aliens is about the limit of gory that I can stand in horror.
There's not much in the way of gore in Aliens. If not for the language by today's standards it might even have secured a PG-13 rating. Of course if Bishop was human Aliens would have gotten a solid R rating, if you know where I'm coming from.


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18496 on: February 20, 2019, 05:26:49 PM »
Yes, cartoonish I can watch, stuff like Kill Bill, I've never seen more than clips of the Saw movies but they look like torture porn to me.
Something like Aliens is about the limit of gory that I can stand in horror.
There's not much in the way of gore in Aliens. If not for the language by today's standards it might even have secured a PG-13 rating. Of course if Bishop was human Aliens would have gotten a solid R rating, if you know where I'm coming from.

Yes, "not much" is my limit for gore ( of the non-cartoonish variety)...


Offline stansimpson

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18497 on: February 20, 2019, 10:03:35 PM »
I don't have anything to contribute right now. I just wanted to point out that we're on page 1234.


Offline goflyblind

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18498 on: February 20, 2019, 10:09:27 PM »
I don't have anything to contribute right now. I just wanted to point out that we're on page 1234.

dF = 0
d*F = J


Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18499 on: February 21, 2019, 12:50:50 PM »
Yes! We're exactly one number away from the stupidest luggage combination over! Or failing that, we're now on the worst PIN for an ATM ever.


Offline stethacantus

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18500 on: February 24, 2019, 09:35:36 PM »
Bastard Swordsman ( 1983 )
This is basically the plot from Eagle Shadow and a lot of other early Jackie Chan and Jackie Chan clone films. An orphan taken in at a martial arts school and working there as a servant is bullied by the other students and instructors. The head of the school shows some sympathy to the orphan, but refuses to allow him to learn Kung Fu. Fortunately a mysterious masked man has agreed to teach the orphan late at night, as long as he doesn't tell anyone he is learning Kung Fu or reveal he has any martial arts skills. So far this sounds exactly like a Jackie Chan film. The thing is, it is not a comedy. A lot of the script suggests it should be a comedy, but it isn't. It is as if after years of making comedies to capitalize on the martial arts comedy trend started by Jackie Chan, Shaw Brothers suddenly changed direction just before principle photography began. Instead, it capitalizes on another trend. The one started by Tsui Hark with Zu: Warriors of the Magic Mountain earlier that same year. The Hong Kong special effect fantasy film. In the case of Bastard Swordsman, the martial arts practiced in this film occasionally involves shooting colorful energy beams from your hands, and in the climatic battle, the ability to incase your opponent in a cocoon. 

The mid 80s was not my favorite period for Shaw Brothers films. This was just before the Shaws decided to shut down their own studio so they could put all their money into a television network, and most of the films have the feel of being farmed out to independent productions rather than being a studio product. And most of the familiar faces who made up the Shaw Brothers contract players are gone. But there are a few films from this period worth watching, and this was one of them.

The Darkest Minds ( 2018 )
This movie was just recently added to Wikipedia's list of American Superhero films. Much like Push and Jumper, it is a film about mutants with super powers, which shouldn't be enough to qualify as a superhero film. After all, superheroes wear costumes. This is why Batman and Punisher qualify as superheroes even though they have no powers whatsoever. But thanks to Marvel Comics, a grey area exists. It began with the X-Men, who did wear costumes, but then came the spin-off books with mutants who didn't wear costumes. Add to that the television series Heroes which had powerful mutants, none of which ever officially became superheroes. So basically,  this film does technically fall within the Superhero category.

But really, it is in a different category with Maze Runner and Hunger Games. It came from a popular book series about teenagers in a dystopian society. There are five books in the series, which means Fox was planning on making six movies. One movie for each book, with the last book being split into two separate films. Which probably will never happen as this film bombed at the box office. This film was in theaters five months ago, and I don't even remember hearing about it or seeing any trailers. It was basically dumped in theaters against Christopher Robin where it was allowed to die. It also got terrible reviews. The Blu-ray only cost me $5 from a third party seller on eBay. So I went into this with very low expectations.

The plot: some mystery disease which attacks kids under the age of 20 kills off 98% of the Earth's children. The ones that survive the disease gain powers, so the government has all children locked up in concentration camps. The film follows a group of kids who have escape from the camps and in their journeys, become a family. I actually liked this film a lot. The only thing I didn't like about it was the ending, which left the kids split up, and just set things up for the sequels. Almost a cliff hanger. Now I am hoping they film the rest of the books.



Streets of Fire: A Rock & Roll Fable ( 1984 )
Had enough  time this week for a third film. There were moments in the 80s when a studio would woo a director with a winning steak by allowing them to make the craziest film they could think of. That's how we got films like John Carpenter's Big Trouble in Little China. After the success of 48 Hours, producer Joel Silver asked director Walter Hill what film he would like to do next. Hill proposed making a musical biker film that he originally dreamed up as a boy in the 1950s. Furthermore, it would be the first film in a proposed trilogy featuring an action hero called Tom Cody. And it was to be based around the Springsteen song Streets of Fire which was originally set to be the final song sung by the film's heroine, rock star Ellen Aim. But then Springsteen withdrew his consent when he realized there would be a cover version, and it was replaced with an original song called Tonight Is What It Means To Be Young. However, the title stuck.

The plot for Streets of Fire is pretty slim. Ellen Aim and her band The Attackers are throwing a concert in her childhood neighborhood when a local bike gang called The Bombers raids the theater she is performing in and kidnaps her. Ellan's old boyfriend, soldier of fortune Tom Cody, is called back to the neighborhood to rescue her. Not to thrilled by their breakup years earlier, Cody only agrees to the rescue mission after Ellen's new boyfriend and manager Billy Fish agrees to pay him $10,000. Ellen is rescued, but is furious that Cody did it for money. Still deep within Bomber territory which includes a corrupt police force, Cody and the rescue party spend the rest of the night sneaking back to the safety of their neighborhood. However, Raven, the leader of the bombers, announces that he intends to wreck the town and take Ellen back unless Cody faces him in a duel. The local police warn Cody not to accept the duel, and for him and Ellen to leave town immediately. After Cody decides not to take his payment from Fish, Ellen realizes she is still in love with him and chases after him, ending up in bed with him. Realizing that he is no good for Ellen, he tricks her into leaving town without him and shows up for the duel.

This was one of my all time favorite films, and one of only three of my top 25 favorite films I can say I saw in the theaters. I loved it back then, and now having seen it for the first time in decades, can say I still love it. It is not really much of an action film ( American action films were still lethargically paced back in the 80s ) but the adventure element and musical elements were great. And the romantic element ( or anti-romantic element ) works. It is one of those films you just can't help but like.

It also has one of those perfect casts. Michael Paré plays Tom Cody, a part that almost went to Tom Cruise, but he turned it down to do Risky Business ( another one of my top 25 favorite films ). At the time Paré was best known as one of Ralph Hinkley's students in the series The Greatest American Hero. He had previously starred in Eddie and the Cruisers, another 50s era Rock & Roll musical that had bombed at the box office, although it would later become a surprise hit on home video. This was pretty much the peak of Peré's career as this and his next film, The Philadelphia Experiment, also bombed. His career had one brief reprise when a sequel was made to Eddie and the Cruisers, but that film got a limited release and was pulled from theaters after a week. Ellan Aim was played by Diane Lane, one of a handful of actresses who I had a crush on in the 80s, and it began with this film. Lane came to fame with two Francis Ford Coppola directed adaptions of S. E. Hinton novels, The Outsiders and Rumble Fish. Still a teenager at the time and unable to sing, she convinced Hill to allow her play the 28 year old Ellan Aim after auditioning for him in tight leather pants and a mesh top. ( that outfit was, unfortunately, not in the film. ) Singers Laurie Sargent and  Holly Sherwood were brought in to dub Lane's singing voice, and were credited as Fire Inc. on the soundtrack album. Rick Moranis played Billy Fish. He was best known as a cast member of Second City Television, and his only previous screen credit was for Strange Brew, a comedy that spun off of a Second City recurring skit called Great White North ( which also spun off a hit song with Moranis. ) After completing Streets of Fire Moranis would begin work on his third movie Ghostbusters. It was also an early film for Amy Madigan who plays McCoy, a female ex-soldier who aids Cody on his rescue mission and ends up being his best friend, and Willem Dafoe  as Bomber leader Raven. Both would later become Academy Award nominees, Defoe just loosing a Best Actor category tonight. It also had Bill Paxton, Robert Townsend, Ed Begley Jr and E.G. Daily in small roles. It also had two veterans from The Warriors, Deborah Van Valkenburgh who plays Cody's sister, and Lynne Thigpen, the DJ from The Warriors who in this film has a small role as a subway motorwoman . In fact, this movie was promoted as a sort of musical version of The Warriors. It wasn't, but the Warriors connection was one of the reasons m and my friends went to see it.

Streets of Fire bombed. It's only lasting legacy, other than having a cult following, was that it spawned the hit Dan Hartman song I Can Dream About You, the movie tie-in video which VH1 and MTV still air to this day on their classics channel. I wasn't planning to see it this week, but didn't realize that SNL was having another off week. With Bastard Swordsman which was a very decent Shaw Brothers mid-80s potboiler, The Darkest Minds which turned out to be a guilty pleasure, and this, one of my favorite films, this has turned out to be a very good weekend for movies.



Offline CJones

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18501 on: February 26, 2019, 10:41:56 PM »
Spiderman: Into the Spiderverse "It CAN get weirder!"

If this doesn't win best art direction at the next Oscars, I will have lost all faith in their voting process.


Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18502 on: February 27, 2019, 05:30:51 AM »
Well it did win for best animated feature, I think that's probably the best win it can aspire to.


Offline Variety of Cells

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18503 on: February 27, 2019, 09:34:25 PM »
Saw The Favourite. I really liked it!  Love that director’s work, or what I’ve seen anyway. It looked beautiful. I loved the period lighting mixed with weird wide fish eye lens’. The costumes were great. And I always love his dialogue that is just off kilter enough to be interesting and hilarious. I still prefer The Lobster overal, but that’s just because I saw it at a time where I could really relate to it.

Plus I love movies with strong female leads, and this had three. Men only played bit parts. None of the women ended up being particularly likable, but they were all very interesting. And I just love how in the last shot, with no words, you see the character realize how so little has changed from the start of the film, despite everything changing.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2019, 09:38:29 PM by Variety of Cells »


Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18504 on: March 03, 2019, 08:04:40 PM »
Watched Bohemian Rhapsody tonight. Really liked it better the second time around, and I found myself having quite a strong emotional reaction(like the first time), but in a good way. I got into Queen when I was little and I guess that's part of why I have such strong feelings for their music.


Offline stethacantus

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18505 on: March 03, 2019, 10:13:11 PM »
Return of Bastard Swordsman ( 1984 )
Yup, that's how the title is spelled. The sequel to Bastard Swordsman, and I am not even sure why he is called that since he barely uses a sword to fight. There was a villain in the first film that sort of disappeared midway through the film. He was the leader of a rival clan to the one the Bastard Swordsman belonged to, determined to  humiliate and kill the clan's head teacher in a duel. Midway through the film the Bastard Swordsman faces him in a duel and is beaten, only surviving his injuries after he is revived using chi energy. The villain retreats to some remote temple so he can practice his Kung Fu so he can reach level 10, and is not seen again for the rest of the film. Instead, another villain emerges who takes over the Swordsman's clan by killing the head teacher and clan leader. It is the second villain that the revived Swordsman fights at the end of that movie. In Return.... the villain returns having reached level 10 and demands to face the Bastard Swordsman in another duel. However, the previous film ended with the Swordsman deciding he had enough of Kung Fu and leaving with his wife to live in seclusion. Since no one knows where the Swordsman is, the villain threatens the remaining clansmen that he will kill everyone in their clan if the Swordsman doesn't return.  He never really gets the chance because  a villainous Japanese clan shows up and slaughters everyone in the Swordsman's clan in order to frame the villain's clan. Their ultimate goal, to get the villain and Swordsman to kill each other in a duel so they can take over the Kung Fu world.  However, the villain figures out the Japanese plot, and for a brief moment it appears as if he and the Swordsman will team up to fight their common enemy.  But instead, they have another duel, and once again the villain beats the Bastard Swordsman.  And once again he is fatally wounded and needs to be revived using supernatural means. While he is recuperating, the villain is confronted by the Japanese and killed.  So basically, we never see the Bastard Swordsman beat the series main villain. He does recuperate and uses his wits to figure out the weakness in the Japanese Kung Fu and beat them.

Once again everyone knows a style of Kung Fu which is basically magic. The Bastard Swordsman's style, Silkworm, allows him to shoot silk from his hands which he uses to encase his opponent in a cocoon. The villain's style allows him to shoot energy beams from his hands, and the Japanese practices a style which allows them to use the beating of their own hearts as weapons. There are plenty of other fantasy elements from other characters making this another effects driven movie. Once again another good film, but you do feel let down that the hero never gets the chance to defeat the main villain.


The Shadow ( 1994 )
The Shadow was a very important milestone in the eventual creation of the superhero. The missing link between the pulp heroes that preceded the superhero, and the costumed superheroes that dominated comic books in the 1940s. You see, The Shadow was the first hero to be both masked and have powers. Before that you had masked heroes like Zorro who were very skilled in combat, but had no powers, and heroes like Hercules who had powers but no secret identity nor costume. The Shadow had it all. A mask to hide his identity, a distinct costume, and the power to cloud the minds of men, so he could make himself invisible. Without The Shadow, it is possible there would not have been the superheroes that followed. And to think, his creation was an accident.

It began with   Detective Story Magazine,   a pulp magazine that published several short detective stories each issue.  To boost sales the publishers arranged to have a radio show of the magazine which debuted in 1930. Each week stories from the magazine were dramatized.  Since each week would have brand new characters, the producer of the radio show decided they needed a  permanent host character. Something like The Crypt Keeper from HBO's Tales From the Crypt sixty years later. So they invented a creepy host character called The Shadow.  Listeners loved the character, but were disappointed to discover no Shadow character existed in the magazine. Realizing a demand for the character existed, the magazine publishers began to publish The Shadow magazine. Embellishing on the character, they decided he would be a masked detective who hid in the shadows. Soon after the radio show decided to drop the anthology format, and rename the radio show The Shadow with the character as a crime fighter.  Since it was not as easy to explain on radio how the Shadow was able to hide from the criminals he was stalking, the writers came up with the gimmick that The Shadow could cloud men's minds to make himself invisible to them. This power in turn was added to the magazine character. By 1937 The Shadow's character was fully developed.  The Shadow radio show was listened to by everyone, including the writers and artists who would some day create the first superheroes.

Let me just say that the 1994 film with Alec Baldwin  was not the first Shadow film.  Five low budget feature films  were made in the 30s and 40s. By all accounts, none of them are faithful to the radio show or pulp magazines. The Shadow in these films does not have any powers, and rarely wears a costume. Also, Wikipedia does not include them on their Superhero movie list. So I am still not sure they count as superhero films.  Perhaps I will get them at a later date.

The 1994 film came out just as the 90s wave of superhero movies was about to reach it's peak.  It was one of the better films of that period, but that's not saying much. But it is decent enough entertainment. It never gets too silly or too serious. For a second there I feared the film was going in the direction of campy when I saw Jonathan Winters  in the cast, but he plays a strait character, and any humor in this film only exists to break the tension.  The villain was dispatched a little too easy, and the final scene was a bit corny, but otherwise it was a solid film.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2019, 10:15:14 PM by stethacantus »


Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18506 on: March 03, 2019, 10:16:27 PM »
I always liked The Shadow. Always a fun time.


Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18507 on: March 07, 2019, 09:48:54 PM »
I just got back from seeing Captain Marvel and I am pleased to say it was pretty great. I had a lot of fun, I was emotionally moved, and Brie Larson was fantastic. Whatever reservations trolls and haters may have had about this movie can be put to bed, if there was any feminist agenda I couldn't detect it. Even if there was one it didn't interfere with the overall story.

There is however one big story point I think needs addressing...and this comes out of Infinity War.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
I mean honestly, I don't really care all that much, most important point being is that Captain Marvel was an excellent time at the movies and I already have my ticket to see it this Saturday afternoon.


Offline stansimpson

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18508 on: March 08, 2019, 06:48:36 AM »
Saw Captain Marvel last night. Agreed, I had a lot of fun and was moved more emotionally than I expected to be.  Basically, if you're a fan of the MCU films, you'll at least have just as much fun as you did with the others in the series (YMMV). As far as any agenda goes, I think sometimes they kind of walk up to the line but never really cross it.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
« Last Edit: March 08, 2019, 06:51:09 AM by stansimpson »


Offline Kete

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18509 on: March 09, 2019, 06:20:31 AM »
No agenda? The whole movie is a metaphor for the female experience. People tell her her whole life that her emotions are out of control, and those people are keeping her from reaching her full potential. There's an agenda, and it's great.