Author Topic: What was the last movie you watched?  (Read 1585928 times)

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Offline wihogfan

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18330 on: November 25, 2018, 07:15:04 AM »
Could be, but there are a lot of stories of bands recording albums out in the middle of nowhere-often as an attempt to keep a member or members with substance abuse problems clean and away from temptation.


Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18331 on: November 25, 2018, 07:54:36 PM »
I saw the 40th Anniversary of Superman at my local theater. I did have one issue, the volume was for some reason kinda low. I love that movie so much though that I still had an absolute blast.


Offline stethacantus

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18332 on: November 25, 2018, 11:24:39 PM »
Human Lanterns ( 1982 )
Wanted to watch this one for Halloween, ended up watching it for Thanksgiving weekend. It's basically a martial arts film, but the first two thirds are a horror film. Two of an unspecified town's richest men are always competing against each other, usually in an annual lantern festival where the best lantern submitted wins. Both men are martial arts experts, one who once defeated a foe, scaring the foe's face for life. He then finds out this former foe is the town's master lantern maker, and hires him to make him a winning lantern. However, not only hasn't the foe forgiven him for being defeated and scared, but that incident turned him insane. So while he agrees to make the lantern, secretly he kidnaps the women who live with both rich men, strips them of their skin while they are still alive, and uses it to make lanterns. Both rich men assume the other is the kidnapper and are soon ready to fight each other, not realizing they are both being manipulated in an elaborate revenge plot. This is actually one of Shaw Brothers better films which only reach cult status here due to it's violent nature. Amazingly, even though American studios we're pumping out slasher films on a weekly basis in the early 80s, a lot of the Hong Kong horror films saw little to no distribution of their English dub prints in North America. Their cult status coming years later via bootlegged VHS tapes from Asia.

Don Q, Son of Zorro ( 1925 )
You can't do a sequel to Zorro. The original novel ends with Don Diego revealing to everyone that he is Zorro, then retiring as a hero due to the fact that Zorro succeeded in driving off the corrupt government officials running California. With no one else to fight and his identity revealed, Zorro was finished. Similarly, Douglas Fairbanks The Mark of Zorro ended with him revealing his identity and retiring as Zorro. It was a one shot story and that was that. But then the movie made the character famous. The original novel, The Curse of the Capistrano became a best seller. Author Johnston McCulley was pressured into writing sequels. So he did. And pretty much nullified the final two chapters of the first novel in the process. For some reason no one knows Don Diego is Zorro. If they did, then running around in a costume and mask and giving yourself an alternate identity would be a bit ridiculous if every knew who you were. But having Don Diego running around fighting injustice wasn't as fun. So pretending the last two chapters never happened was the only option.

The Mark of Zorro was the first blockbuster for Douglas Fairbanks, which is why he wanted to follow it up with similar films. He bought the rights to McCulley's sequel novel so he could do his own Zorro sequel, but then realized he couldn't just ignore the end of his own film. Meanwhile Fairbanks had bought the rights to another novel, Don Q's Love Story which told the origin of the Don Q character. Fairbanks was looking for another character similar to Zorro, and found it in the bandit Don Q. Then came the idea of combining Don Q with Zorro, making the Don Q character Don Diego's son.

This film is just barely a sequel to The Mark of Zorro. Fairbanks plays both the now 60 year old Don Diego and his son Cesar. While most of the plot to Don Q's Love Story was retained, the Don Q character was ultimately eliminated. Only in one scene does a fugitive Cesar call himself Don Q when asked his name, and that is it for the rest of the film. The plot, Don Cesar is in Spain where he and a rival are both in love with the same girl. When the rival murders a visiting prince, he decides to frame Don Cesar. Facing execution, Don Cesar fakes his death which allows him to go on the lamb long enough to find the evidence to prove his innocence. In the final ten minutes there is a confrontation between Don Cesar and the rival and his men. That is when Don Diego shows up ( in split screen ) in his old Zorro costume to lend Don Cesar a hand.

Basically this is a good film. But it was sold as both a Zorro sequel and Don Q film. Zorro is barely in it, and you have to wait until the last ten minutes to see Zorro. And for fans of the character Don Q ( which there are not many fans of today, but there were a lot of back in the 1920s when the character was still popular ) this movie was a complete ripoff.

Sally of the Sawdust ( 1925 )
Shocking but true, WC Fields was originally a silent film star. Well, actually he was a stage star who was cast in a few silent movies with moderate success and didn't have his breakthrough success until the sound era. Since almost all the comedy in a WC Fields film came from his one liners, it is hard to imagine how good he could have been in a film where he was unable to use his voice. So far every Fields film I have ever seen has been sound, so this would be a first for me.

Sally of the Sawdust was directed by the master of silent cinema, D.W. Griffith. It was an adaption of the musical Poppy of which Fields co-wrote and starred in on Broadway. But with the plot altered for screen and the name of the girl changed from Poppy to Sally. The alterations to the plot made so that the story was closer to the type of melodrama Griffith usually directed. Also, because the musical elements could not be used in a silent film. The story becomes more of a drama than comedy. Just as I thought, Fields is hardly funny without his one liners. He is barely given any opportunity to use slapstick. And even though Griffith was a master of silent film, he knew nothing about directing comedy. The only part I laughed at was a gag where Sally nearly beans someone with a small rock. Fields stops her and seems to chastise her, but then hands her a large rock. Other than that, none of the other comedy seemed to work. As a drama the film was very effective. But with WC Fields as the star, you want the film to be funny. Fortunately another version of Poppy would be made a decade later with sound, and this time you heard all of Fields one liners in all their glory.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2018, 08:36:23 AM by stethacantus »


Offline stansimpson

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18333 on: November 26, 2018, 06:56:11 AM »
Watched The Inspector General starring Danny Kaye for the first time. I scoffed at the movie so many times before, because it’s always in those discount $1 dvd bins. And the little-to-no quality preservation doesn’t help matters. It's quite good! Better than Secret Life of Walter Mitty but not quite Wonder Man. And, unlike Hans Christian Andersen, no slow parts to kill the pacing. The songs are almost too silly (and ubiquitous), but that’s also where Danny Kaye’s talent (among his many others) really shines. Glad IMDb pulled through (6.8 rating!), otherwise, I wouldn’t have given it a chance. It’s a must-watch for any Danny Kaye fan. Currently streaming on Amazon Prime for anyone interested.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2018, 07:13:47 AM by stansimpson »


Offline stethacantus

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18334 on: December 02, 2018, 10:46:00 PM »
Disciples of Shaolin ( a.k.a. Invincible One ) ( 1975 )
The title is misleading. Made during Chang Cheh's Shaolin Cycle where any film involving the Shaolin Temple or the Kung Fu masters from Shaolin was popular, this film had absolutely nothing to do with Shaolin. The Manchurian who run a textile millions want to drive the only other textile millions in town out of business, mostly by beating up the rival's employees. Alexander Fu Sheng is a poor martial arts experts who ends up becoming the foreman of the other textile millions when he defends them from the manchurians. Basically another one of Chang Cheh's gangster films, but set further back in the past, and one of Fu Sheng's best films.

Superbabies: Baby Geniuses 2 ( 2003 )
This week was supposed to be the final Zorro film. Actually, I wanted to end the Zorro films with the Fairbanks films. But there was one film I had ordered months ago which never arrived, because the seller didn't have it in stock, and instead of admitting it, attempted to back order it from his distributor, finally sending me a refund over a month later. So I reordered it, this time directly from Amazon, and now they are telling me it won't arrive until January. So I will move to the next film on the list. And close out the Zorro films some other time.

Talking about closing out, I was so sure I had closed out every kids superhero film, at least the ones aimed at grade schoolers. Then among the suggested films on Amazon, this popped up. A superhero film not even on Wikipedia's list. And damnit, it is this film! Let me explain. Baby Geniuses, a film with babies who appear to be talking due to CGI effects, is on practically every all time worst movie list, usually in the top 10. Well, critics say the sequel was worse. I never knew there were any sequels until Amazon suggested this. Turns out there were a bunch of direct to video sequels and a television series.

The first sequel was made for theatrical release, but SONY chose to release it full screen. Although released on DVD in 2005, SONY was still releasing fill screen movies on DVD. Anyone who accidentally bought a full screen Spiderman film could tell you that. Just before the opening credits the screen shrinks to letterbox. This is what full screen films usually did to prevent the credits from being cropped. But then for no reason the letteboxing ends before the credits begin. During this time a character, who is emerging from a secret door, is almost entirely cropped off the screen. This makes zero sense until you read the box, which says "Family Edition" and on the back in a fine print disclaimer "...has been slightly edited for content from the original theatrical release." I did a little research and discovered all the edits were made to remove any image of one of the villains holding a gun. The abrupt ending of the letterboxing appears to be an optical close up, which means they first decided to release this film full frame, then put it in letterbox so the title screen during the opening credits, then changed that to an optical close up so you couldn't see one of the bad guys holding a gun.  BTW, the only Region 1 version I could find were "family" edits in full screen. No uncensored nor widescreen version of this film has ever been released on home video.

The plot: what I assume are the talking babies from the first film meet Kahuna, a world traveling super spy baby who, thanks to accidentally ingesting a secret formula back in the 1940s, is forever stuck as a toddler despite growing an adult brain, and has super strength. Kahuna travels the world freeing children trapped in bad orphanages and finding them new parents. But he is also constantly fighting his arch enemy, a German mad scientist called Biscane ( played by Jon Voight, who got his granddaughter, actresses Skyler Shaye into the film as well. )  When a CD Biscane needs for his latest world domination plan accidentally ends up in the baby geniuses carriage, they find themselves on the run from Biscane's minions. Kahuna rescues them and brings them to his secret underground base. There he shows them a machine that can turn each into costumed superheroes. Inevitably Biscane and his minions attacks the base and the baby superheroes help defend it.

Sounds horrible, right? Well, amazing it wasn't. While definitely not a good film, it was nowhere as bad as most of the other kids films I had seen. And it is momentarily nice in the climax when actresses Vanessa Angel  and Skyler Shaye, who are some of the adults who run the daycare center ( or possibly orphanage? ) where the baby geniuses hang out, decide to help defend Kahuna's base, and suddenly show up wearing leather outfits. I say momentarily because the outfits, consisting of black leather pants and jacket, turn out to be baggy. And then Scott Baio shows up in the same outfit. Oh yeah, that's right. Scott Baio is in this movie too. And Whoopee Goldberg and the group O Town make brief cameos appearances. ( Anyone vaguely  remember the band called O Town? ) So basically I didn't have a horrible time watching this film. But it is still something you'd want to avoid at all costs.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2018, 10:49:46 PM by stethacantus »


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18335 on: December 05, 2018, 10:53:49 AM »
So I snagged a couple of those Amazon Prime Only tickets to see Aquaman early on the 15th. It's a gamble for sure, but the night was right for a date night, and Tyrant and I seem to possess the rare ability to enjoy DC movies, so we're going for it. Kind of neat to see a movie before most of the rest of the world.


Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18336 on: December 07, 2018, 02:13:43 PM »
So I snagged a couple of those Amazon Prime Only tickets to see Aquaman early on the 15th. It's a gamble for sure, but the night was right for a date night, and Tyrant and I seem to possess the rare ability to enjoy DC movies, so we're going for it. Kind of neat to see a movie before most of the rest of the world.
Lucky. I'm not all that interested in seeing Aquaman but I'm glad you two can get enjoyment out of DC films. Make sure and let us know what you thought of the movie... unless of course there's an embargo on reviews until closer to the relase date.


Offline stethacantus

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18337 on: December 09, 2018, 08:23:44 PM »
Choy Lay Fut  ( or is it Choi Lee Fat Kung-Fu? )( 1979 )
There were a couple of other martial arts films I was in the mood to see this week, and as usual, couldn't find which damn box I put either in. But while digging through my DVD collection I dug up a double feature disc from Ground Zero with a film I have never seen, Choy Lay Fut. Or is it Chio Lee Fat Kung-Fu?

A bit of an explanation. About ten years ago I was collecting every movie that aired on Channel 11's Fists of Fury Theater and ordered Tiger's Claw from a seller on Amazon. I had ordered the release from Crash Cinema which was mastered from an actual 35mm film prints. Instead I was sent a release from Ground Zero, the company that began as the bootlegger Dragon Video back in the 80s, and in the 90s until recently put the same crappy tenth generation VHS bootleg masters on DVD. Ground Zero put a number of DVDs out under the Black Belt Theater logo, stealing the name from the defunct World Northal who syndicated martial arts movies to television under the same name. Ground Zero's print of Tiger's Claw was full frame and no doubt mastered from the old Master Arts VHS release. I complained to the seller, and he apologized and refunded the money, telling me to keep the DVD.

The DVD was a double feature with two films. I never bothered watching either knowing that Tiger's Claw was coming from another seller, only as the Crash Cinema release I had asked for. But what did catch my attention was the second film on the DVD. A film I never heard of called Choy Lay Fut. And the reason it interested me was the description of the film on the back of the DVD box which read:

A worldwide search was conducted to find this lost treasure. Blackbelt Theater proudly presents Choy Lay fut, a deadly style of kung Fu. Featuring The most amazing fight scenes you will ever see. Plus authentic training techniques reveled for the first time! A guaranteed classic!

A lost classic? I doubt it. When I began to play it out of curiosity, it began with this text disclaimer:

Lost Film Series

The film you are about to see is considered a "lost film". No acceptable
film print or the film's negative can be found. The staff at Blackbelt Theater are
proud to revive the film presented.  Although the quality is not broadcast standard,
we hope you will enjoy what would otherwise be an extinct title.

After which an extremely bad looking VHS bootleg print started playing. I immediately lost interest and turned it off, putting the "lost classic"  into a pile of DVDs and forgetting about it. Only to discover I still had it this weekend. I was once again curious to see what Ground Zero was claiming to be a lost treasure. But let's get this straight. There is no way in hell Ground Zero went n any worldwide search for anything. In fact, it turns out that Wu Tang Clan were able to find a superior print, most likely an actual 35mm theatrical print, for their DVD release of the same film. It is very possible that the negatives are long gone. a lot of the original negatives for many Hong Kong produced films are missing, either thrown out, destroyed or more likely taken by Triad gangs. They still cant find the original camera negatives for half of Bruce Lee's films. But even the lowest budget independent martial arts film got wide distribution, resulting in at least thousands of theatrical prints, most of which ended up in the hands of collectors once their theatrical run ended. More likely this was a really bad VHS tape of a movie that Ground Zero decided to bootleg, and they wanted some sort of excuse for it's poor quality.


But is it a classic? Well, that all depends on if you want to lump every old school martial arts film together as classics. But try looking this up on Hong Kong Cinemagic  or HKMDb and they just barely mention it as existing. Nowhere on the internet is it mentioned as classic, or as a notable film.


The copy presented by Ground Zero looks like a bad English dubbed theatrical print with scratches and splices that was released on video in India. ( It has Hindi subtitles  and a constant logo/watermark from the video company that released it.) Furthermore the VHS copy was worn down and damaged prior to being bootlegged, which this appears to have gone through many generations prior to Ground Zero getting it. It is cropped as letterboxed, but Ground Zero has been known to have cropped full screen prints for fake letterboxing. Also, despite what Ground Zero calls the film, the actual title on the opening credits on the dub print are Chio Lee Fat Kung-Fu. The only ones calling this film Choy Lay Fut is Ground Zero, and only on their box. Which means they are hiding the film from the legal copyright holders. I should also point out that Ground Zero put the film on a double sided disc with nothing on it to identify what movie it is. And I am not talking about each side having one movie. Both movies are on the same side and side two is blank.


So, is the film a classic? Well, no. It is yet another Snake in the Eagle's Shadow clone. It even has a couple of the actors from that film playing similar roles. At least the comedy is toned down to almost nonexistent. Perhaps because the film makers were so bad at crafting comedy that what looked like dramatic parts of the film was suppose to be funny. The martial arts choreography is okay.  no fight stands out as memorable. The best thing about the film is actress Sharon Pan Pan Yeung, who was a terrific screen fighter, but for some reason her career peaked with The Story of the Drunken Master ( 1979 ) ( One of the many unofficial sequels to Drunken Master. ) But if you want to see her in a better film, she was the female lead in the Shaw Brothers misfire Lion vs Lion ( 1981 ).


The Lone Ranger ( 1956 )
This week I begin watching the Lone Ranger films, who just barely counts as a superhero. Only recently Wikipedia added Lone Ranger films to their superhero movie list. So far only four films exist, two o which I only found out about in the past few months. The first two came from the same producer as the 50s television series and had the same cast of Clayton Moore and Jay Silverheels. It also had Frank DeKova from F-Troop  in the cast. The plot: a  rancher attempts to start a war between native Americans on a nearby reservation and local ranchers. It is up to the Lone Ranger to prevent the war, and expose the corrupt rancher.  It is a decent western that doesn't feel like just an extended episode. My only complaint was that when I opened the DVD case the first thing I found was a sheet of paper advertising that the same DVD company was releasing a deluxe 2 disc DVD set of the same film with the widescreen version instead of the full frame version on the disc I bought. Now that is a kick in the ass. I checked and the deluxe 2 disc version of both this and it's sequel are not available. In fact, there were barely any copies of the full screen release when I purchased these, and I was lucky to find any unused copies under $20. Not only is it  surprising that a Warner Bros. film starring Clayton Moore as the Lone Ranger was OOP, but that it wasn't even released by Warner Bros. home video. It was released by a smaller company called VCI which specializes in "nostalgic movies".  I get why it would be OOP on the Warner Bros. label. They got so many of their other film catalog as well as the M.G.M. catalog to release that they would need to rotate their old movies. But VIC? What excuse do they have for putting any of their films OOP?    The good news is that this film was aparently shot for 1:33:1, meaning they kept all the characters and action within a square area on the frame. No doubt the producer did this knowing the movie would eventually be used as episodes of the television series, and he didn't want anything important cropped out of the full screen presintation. That means that I don't really need to worry about tracking down a widescreen copy of the film.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2018, 08:35:23 PM by stethacantus »


Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18338 on: December 13, 2018, 06:21:49 PM »
So I went to see Spiderman: Into the Spiderverse tonight. Unfortunately it taxed my patience a little too much and I walked out. With close to 100% on the Rotten Tomatoes meter I was certain I was going to enjoy this movie. Unfortunately it spent a little too much time on Miles Morales and he's just not all that interesting. Believe me, I did not go into this thing fully expecting to hate it. I also didn't like the animation style, it was just very jarring and disjointed if you ask me. I was expecting a movie totally about all these different incarnations of Spider-man, but I got something else.

I admit, maybe I just don't like animated movies anymore or something.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18339 on: December 16, 2018, 12:50:39 AM »
Got to check out the early Amazon Prime screening of Aquaman.


It's all very silly (It's a much cooler Aquaman, but it's still Aquaman! He Talks to fish and rides giant Sea Dragons!), but the movie owns it. It dragged on for the first act when it was all about Atlantean lineage and origin stories, but once the maguffin hunt kicked in, it was a lot of fun. Fun, of course, being something that has been lacking somewhat in the DC Cinematic Universe. They didn't bog things down with tragedy and broodiness. They leaned into the silliness and it made for a very enjoyable movie. There were 5 superhero movies this year (Off the top of my head) that were better, but it's not a bad way to spend a couple hours.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2018, 12:52:35 AM by Pak-Man »


Offline Lesbunny

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18340 on: December 16, 2018, 01:41:55 PM »
Ghostbusters(2016) - That movie was awesome. Everything about it was great. Chris Hemsworth was a perfect reversal of the eye candy receptionist trope, the fact that the villain was basically a satire of those fanbois who were whining about women being the new Ghostbusters is brilliant, and oh my god, the women. They were all incredible, but I've got to go with Kate McKinnon for standout of the film, seriously. That woman can literally play ANYTHING and be incredible at it, I swear. The ghost effects were cool, the running joke of Kristen Wiig always being the one to get slimed was great, the fact that most of the original Ghostbusters were in it was fantastic (RIP Harold Ramis). Seriously, it was fantastic, absolutely recommended.


Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18341 on: December 16, 2018, 02:26:02 PM »
I forgot if I shared my opinion about Ghostbusters(2016) a couple years ago, but I actually kind of liked it. It may stand in the shadow of its predecessor but it's still a solid film. I found the backlash to it to be completely unwarranted. Sometimes some "fans" take their hatred just a little bit too far.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18342 on: December 16, 2018, 03:32:58 PM »
Yeah. GB '16 gets WAY more flack than it deserves. We'd probably be due for another new Ghostbusters sequel if it wasn't for fans of the Ghostbusters. This is why we can't have nice fandoms.


Offline Darth Geek

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18343 on: December 16, 2018, 07:13:34 PM »
I was pretty meh on it, but I would definitely have been up for a sequel if it had better writing.



Offline stethacantus

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18344 on: December 16, 2018, 09:46:59 PM »
Lion vs Lion (a.k.a. The Roar of the Lion )( 1981 )
Last week I watched a movie featuring Sharon Pan Pan Yeung which Ground Zero was calling a lost classic. While it was anything but a lost classic, I thought that this week I would watch what was her highest profile film, made for Hong Kong's biggest studio Shaw Brothers. After the amazing success of Snake in the Eagle's Shadow and Drunken Master, Shaw Brothers, like every other studio, began making martial arts comedies. Not many of these were any good. Shaw Brothers did have a few good comedies, but this wasn't really one of them. It has one gag that is very funny, and the rest that aren't. That seems to be the curse of most martial arts comedies, having one great laugh for the entire film an the rest of the gags falling flat. ( The same thing in America. They Call Me Bruce had one great gag about a purse snatcher, and the rest of the film sucked. ) But at least Lion vs Lion had a lot of great fight scenes. The plot: Rebels against the Ching Dynasty are delivering a list of the names of their members, which has been split in half with the coded names on one scroll and the key on another. Spies for the Chings are after that list. Meanwhile a con artist and an ex-Ching chief of police who was fired for being too honest and not allowing bribes, have opened a martial arts school. They enter a Lion Dance contest where the contestants put on a two man lion costume ( a sort of Muppet style outfit similar to the dragon costume worn in parades ) and compete to see which one is able to climb up a tower and eat a rope with prize money attached to it. Each lion has to perform specific dance moves while at the same fighting the men in the  rival lion costume. But what they don't realize is that the rebel bringing the key scroll has tied it to the prize rope. Lion vs Lion ends with the villain chasing the film's comedian through a haunted house, and then for no good reason ends tragically with everyone getting killed by Ching soldiers who suddenly show up for no reason in the final two minutes of the film. ( The bootleg of this film actually omitted the ending, cutting it off at the point where it appeared as if the good guy got away. ) The comedian of the film was Wang Yu,  better known as Wang Yu II because Shaw brothers had previously had an actor named Wang Yu ( known as Jimmy Wang Yu outside of China. ) The second Wang Yu became Shaw Brother's  answer to Jackie Chan, with his best film being the classic Dirty Ho ( 1979 ). However, he never quite caught on as a screen comedian. His friend in the film was Lo Meng of the Venom Mob. It also had Wang Lung Wei, wo for most of the film appeared to be one of the heroes, but then turned out to be one of the spies. Not really a spoiler here, because that is what Wang Lung Wei's character does in every film he was in.  Sharon had a pretty substantial role as the female rebel delivering the first scroll, and had a very decent fight with Wang just before the third act.  Shame her career never took off.


The Lone Ranger and the Lost City of Gold ( 1958 )
The Lone Ranger radio series began January 30th, 1933 and continued until September 3 1954.  Apparently the theme song was picked because it was public domain and they probably had an old recording of it in the station's music library. Otherwise the William Tell Overture sounds nothing like music that should be playing over a western. But it would become the Lone Ranger's signature music for almost all the incarnations of the character that followed. One of those being the television series which began on September  15th,  1949. Like most successful radio series from the 1940s, it was adapted into a television series. The first season ran for 78 episodes, lasting over year and a half. Television was a lot different back then. ( After the season ended all 78 episodes were repeated before Season 2 began, leaving a year and a half gap between seasons. Season 2 was even longer,  running for 104 episodes. In syndication the first and second season were split, making them seasons 1 through 4 with season 3 becoming season 5. )  The producer decided to film season three ( now season five ) in color. But first came the movie released through Warner Bothers.  The new industry standard was 39 episodes for their series, which was all that ABC ordered for the final season. The producer decided that it was no longer worth selling episodes to television and instead wanted to make more Lone Ranger movies. The last episode aired on June 5th, 1957.

So The Lone Ranger and the Lost City of Gold was suppose to be the second in  series of Lone Ranger films starring the cast from the television series. However, no other films were made. Must have been trouble getting distributors interested. Warner didn't wat to release the second film, so it went to United Artists. It opens with his origin, which the first film didn't bother with.  Although the origin is only a minute or so long and is shown as flash backs during the opening song. The plot: masked bandits are robbing and killing. The Lone Ranger realizes the victims are all Native Americans and soon uncovers a plot to.... well, the title is a SPOILER. But basically, what the bandits are stealing from the Native Americans is the key to finding the Lost City of Gold. It is another good Western that doesn't feel like an expanded episode. I am surprised that no other movies were made after this one. But it would be another 23 years before another Lone Ranger theatrical film was made.


Coincidently, this is about the time of year when David Letterman would air his annual Christmas episode. Each year he brought back the same guests to do the same thing. Darlene Love was always the musical guest and would always close the show singing Christmas ( Baby Please Come Home ).  ( She has since moved to The View for this annual event after Letterman retired. ) Each year Paul Shaffer would do his Cher singing Oh Holly Night imitation. And each year the guest would be Jay Thomas who would knock a meatball off the top of the set's Christmas tree with a football, and always tell the same Lone Ranger story.  And this is it....

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/KFabfnfhIaY" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/KFabfnfhIaY</a>