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Author Topic: What was the last movie you watched?  (Read 1522745 times)

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Offline Russoguru

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18315 on: November 15, 2018, 09:21:49 PM »
I watched Zero Dark Thirty today. It was alright... if a bit long clocking in at over two and a half hours. It was kind of an interesting watch but it didn't do enough to really draw me in. Jessica Chastain was good. Oh, also, on the plus side, Chris Pratt is in it too.


Offline Lesbunny

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18316 on: November 15, 2018, 10:37:12 PM »
I loved that one. Thought it was super cool


Offline Variety of Cells

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18317 on: November 17, 2018, 09:14:31 PM »
Just watched The Ballad of Buster Scruggs on Netflix. I’m so happy to see the Coen brothers back in rare form after the boring Hail Cesar (and I never heard of Suburbicon but apparently it wasn’t great).  This was fantastic. I particularly love the first story. Anyone else see it?  I recommend it. Even just watching one or two parts at a time, as it is a cole toon of a few unrelated stories from the west.


Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18318 on: November 18, 2018, 01:39:11 AM »
Just watched The Ballad of Buster Scruggs on Netflix. I’m so happy to see the Coen brothers back in rare form after the boring Hail Cesar (and I never heard of Suburbicon but apparently it wasn’t great).  This was fantastic. I particularly love the first story. Anyone else see it?  I recommend it. Even just watching one or two parts at a time, as it is a cole toon of a few unrelated stories from the west.

We watched it last night. The first story is by far the best, but the whole package is great. The Franco one seemed a little short to me? Like it was meant to fell like it escalated and escalated but didn't quite push far enough, IMO.
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Offline Variety of Cells

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18319 on: November 18, 2018, 04:28:45 AM »
I like how the Franco one ended, but I see your point. The only thing I found unfortunate was how the film portrayed Native Americans as typical blood thirsty bad guys. But the whole film did seem to be a darker take on traditional old west stories, and it’s not as if there weren’t Native Americans that did those things in the past.

The first story was fantastic though. Such a great comentary on the absurdity of the noble western gun slinger archetype.


Offline Kete

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18320 on: November 18, 2018, 07:20:16 AM »
Just watched The Ballad of Buster Scruggs on Netflix. I’m so happy to see the Coen brothers back in rare form after the boring Hail Cesar (and I never heard of Suburbicon but apparently it wasn’t great).  This was fantastic. I particularly love the first story. Anyone else see it?  I recommend it. Even just watching one or two parts at a time, as it is a cole toon of a few unrelated stories from the west.

I loved it, and yes the Tim Blake Nelson segment is great.


Offline Lesbunny

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18321 on: November 18, 2018, 03:07:47 PM »
Black Panther.

Yo. That was fucking solid.


Offline CJones

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18322 on: November 18, 2018, 07:46:05 PM »
The Meg

That was actually better than I thought it would be, to be honest. It has a good ensemble cast of memorable and mostly likable characters. Reminded me a bit of a good Dwayne Johnson movie.

I was disappointed Jason Statham never got into a fist fight with the shark though :P


Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18323 on: November 18, 2018, 10:42:47 PM »
I like how the Franco one ended, but I see your point. The only thing I found unfortunate was how the film portrayed Native Americans as typical blood thirsty bad guys. But the whole film did seem to be a darker take on traditional old west stories, and it’s not as if there weren’t Native Americans that did those things in the past.

The first story was fantastic though. Such a great comentary on the absurdity of the noble western gun slinger archetype.

Completely agree with the Native American portrayal - we talked about that after we watched it.
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Offline stethacantus

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18324 on: November 18, 2018, 10:55:27 PM »
Struggle Through Death  ( 1979 )
…...Or STD for short. And that should be warning enough. The only reason why I have this one is because I was collecting the films shown on Tribune's Fist of Fury Theater which aired martial arts films every Saturday during the 80s. ( Not to be confused with the superior Black Belt Theater which also aired martial arts films every Saturday, most of which were from Shaw Brothers studios. )  This movie has made a lot of worst martial arts movie lists, and well deserved to. It starred John Liu, a martial artist who was a fantastic screen fighter and deserved to have better than a cult following. It also had Chin Lung, who usually plays comedy relief, but not in this film. And actor Paul Wei Ping Ao, who usually plays a traitor.  Which he does in this movie on cue, blabbing to the warden that his fellow slaves  are planning a revolt. The rest of the cast are the usual contract players who worked for the bargain basement Hsu Hung Film Co.  Although according to the opening credits, the cast also includes this guy....



The best I can tell, Hsu Hung wanted to reuse the location set for Incredible Kung Fu Mission, perhaps to justify the cost of dressing up an existing ancient stone bridge into the gate of a prison camp complete with cheap huts on the other side of the arch. In Incredible Kung Fu Mission this set was suppose to be an impenetrable prison that the heroes need to rescue a dissident from. In this movie it is a slave labor camp. A general has been kidnapping men and forcing them to work as slaves in a goldmine. The slaves are constantly beaten for no reason and the mine is always collapsing and killing slaves. So of course the three lead characters are always trying to escape and always end up recaptured and nearly beaten to death before the camp's doctor steps in and begs the commandant to spare their lives. This happens over and over again. Another sympathetic character is the camp's overseer who is only there because he owes the general a favor, but is appalled at the treatment of the slaves. So much so that midway through the film he begins to secretly teach John Lui Kung Fu. That's right. For most of the film's run time John Liu is no good at Kung Fu, and is constantly beaten up by the guards. In any other of his films he would play a martial arts master who could have easily kicked the asses of all the bad guys in this film in the first five minutes. But this movie needed to explain why Liu could easily be captured and enslaved, and later explain how he is able to finally beat all the bad guys in the final ten minutes.


So not only don't you get a proper John Liu film until the final ten minutes, and everything up till then is him being tortured and abused along with the rest of the slaves, but the writers of this film plagiarized Roots, specifically the scene where Liu is captured which is almost identical to the scene where LeVar Burton was captured, and a scene where Chin Lung is recaptured after an escape attempt and whipped in front of the other slaves, which is shot by shot and almost word by word identical to the scene where LeVar Burton is whipped after his escape attempt until he agrees his name is Toby and not Kunta Kinte. I can't really call this a bad film as it never really gets boring, which is the worst sin a movie can make.  But John Liu not knowing Kung Fu until the very end of the film is a complete waste of his talents. And the plagiarism is inexcusable.

The Mark of Zorro ( 1920 )
Let me just get to the point and say this is a great film. I mean, it could lose the romance parts, but it is still great. While Jackie Chan credits Buster Keaton with his inspiration for his style of film making, undoubtedly Douglas Fairbanks was his inspiration for his screen fighting style. Fairbanks effortlessly leaps over and under tables and other furniture during sword fights the same way Chan does during his martial arts fights. Fairbanks basically invented Parkour with his ability to leap up the side of walls and buildings. He was an outstanding athlete and used his movies to show that ability off. One can only be grateful that he abandoned making comedy films and instead began making action films.


Lets compare this film to the 1940 remake. As already stated, none of the Zorro films follows the narrative of the source novel Curse of the Capistrano where the secret identity of Zorro is not revealed until the final chapter, at which we find out Zorro is actually the most unlikely character in the book, the weakling Don Diego who had been only pretending to be fey so no one would have suspected he was Zorro. The 1940 remake starts in Spain, and establishes that Don Diego is a superior swordsman and horseman, having learned these skills in the army. When he returns to his childhood home of California and discovers it being run by a corrupt governor who is brutalizing the common folk, Don Diego decides to become Zorro, but pretend he  is nothing more than a bookworm when he reaches his home village. The 1920 original starts with Zorro already existing as a mysterious bandit that the soldiers and tax collectors all fear, many due to Zorro's habit of etching his Z mark right into their flesh. It isn't until about 20 minutes into the film that there is a reveal that Zorro is Don Diego. Up until that point Zorro is a creature of terror. Not unlike Batman who's creation was inspired by this movie. In fact, the opening of Tim Burton's Batman borrows a lot from the opening of this film.


So basically the 1940 remake blows the atmosphere because the studio wanted to establish up front that Tyrone Power was Zorro and Don Diego. They also blow the Don Diego character. In the 1920 original Fairbanks depicts the public Don Diego as a weakling. Don Diego in the Tyrone Power film is just as dashing and virile as Zorro. The 1940 version has the Governor figure out that Don Diego is Zorro before the final act begins, this due to him defeating Basil Rathbone in a sword fight and soldiers finding secret passageways in his house. So the final act of the movie is all Don Diego as the hero and no Zorro.  20th Century Fox just couldn't bare to keep Tyrone Powers facial features covered up. The 1920 version also ends with Don Diego acting as the hero instead of Zorro, different from the novel where Zorro does not unmask himself until the governor is overthrown. But this only happens in the final ten minutes. As Zorro, Diego takes the girl he was trying to save to his house and hides her in a secret room, explaining to her that he is friends with Don Diego who is allowing him to use his house. In order to throw off the general and soldiers searching for Zorro, Diego has to return to his alter identity and answer the door. Of course the stupid girl he is trying to save gets curious and opens the hidden door to the room to look out, then forgets to close it, and then gets captured. The general accuses Diego of being in league with Zorro, at which he immediately gets into a final sword fight, defeating him after which he announces that he is Zorro. It is actually a wonderful moment where everyone who had no respect for the weakling Don Diego, including his father, are suddenly in awe of discovering he is the mysterious hero.  The 1920 version may have deviated from the novel, but it still got it right. The 1940 version got it wrong. You still had a pretty good Zorro film, but it could have been a lot better if only they had stuck to the blueprint of the original. 








« Last Edit: November 18, 2018, 11:01:34 PM by stethacantus »


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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18325 on: November 20, 2018, 09:27:09 PM »
The Ballad of Buster Scruggs

Anthology of 6 short western stories, mostly dark humor.  Some of the segments are better than others, overall good, not great.  I would have cut out the story with the wagon train, it didn't have the humor of the others and after it is over you just feel it was a waste of time.


Offline CJones

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18326 on: November 22, 2018, 04:10:31 PM »
Just watched The Ballad of Buster Scruggs on Netflix. I’m so happy to see the Coen brothers back in rare form after the boring Hail Cesar (and I never heard of Suburbicon but apparently it wasn’t great).  This was fantastic. I particularly love the first story. Anyone else see it?  I recommend it. Even just watching one or two parts at a time, as it is a cole toon of a few unrelated stories from the west.

I just got done watching it. Great movie, if you can really call it that. I wish we saw more of Buster Scruggs himself. The part with the wagon train was my favorite, despite the ending. DOG HOLE!

The Coens were on NPR a couple days ago talking about this movie. They said shooting the wagon train was a nightmare. It was half a mile long. They'd yell action, and it would take ten minutes for the wagon at the end of the train to start moving. Then one of the oxen would just decide to wander off in the wrong direction, they'd yell cut and then they'd have to move everyone back to their starting positions. They asked the wrangler if there was any way they could order to oxen to just move to a specific spot and he'd just roll his eyes ::)

I could have done without the part about the guy with no limbs. Also, I don't know if it's my speakers, but I had a really hard time understanding the last segment, especially the singing. I eventually just turned CC on.


Offline Variety of Cells

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18327 on: November 23, 2018, 08:28:01 PM »
Creed II.  The punches in these movies land so solid and square that anyone would be knocked out by two of them.  And yet we are supposed to believe that boxing is two slabs of meat standing in a ring getting constantly hit in the face. 

Oh, and the rest of the movie is boring and nothing you haven't seen before.  I'm also pretty sure that Rocky is Creed's imaginary drunk uncle that only he can see.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
« Last Edit: November 23, 2018, 08:41:37 PM by Variety of Cells »


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18328 on: November 24, 2018, 05:14:36 PM »
Went to see Ralph Breaks the Internet. Loved it. Not as much of a video game presence after the "going to the Internet" part, but the story told was solid, and it's not every movie that can boast Zangief, Pocahontas, AND Stormtroopers.


Offline Darth Geek

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #18329 on: November 24, 2018, 07:10:20 PM »
Bohemian Rhapsody - I enjoyed this a lot. I get where the criticisms are coming from. Particularly the first half being the CliffsNotes version of the band's history with very little conflict. But I didn't really mind that because I was having fun. The performances are all great, especially Rami Malek. It's Queen, so the music is all amazing. I'd recommend it.


I did notice one funny thing. The scene where they go to the barn in the middle of nowhere to record the A Night At The Opera album. I assume that really happened. So is that the inspiration for the setup of Rock 'N Roll Nightmare?