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Offline Compound

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12720 on: May 16, 2013, 02:08:01 AM »
Star Trek: Into Darkness

Yeah, I'm a Trekkie. I make no bones about that. And unlike certain folks who posted here, I didn't view the first one as an accursed abomination of a movie. But first, two pre-movie things to gripe about:

*First an ad for Fuze, where three things are combined to make something great! In this case, a surfer/craftsman/animal lover, which means he built a tandem surfboard to let his dog surf with him. That's a horribly stupid idea. Dogs are not humans. They don't really get the concept of surfing.

*Ender's Game: I saw the trailer for the first time, although I've heard folks discussing it elsewhere. And while I understand some of the concerns they have expressed, there's a real big one that I have with the trailer that I can't even hint about. So I'll bring it up later, I guess. (And no, it has nothing to do with OSC.)

As for Trek itself, I enjoyed it, but I'm rather bemused by it, for the following reasons.
* There's an awful lot of lens flare. I just rewatched the first film and there's more of it in the sequel. Maybe it's just more noticeable on the big screen, but I suspect JJ boosted it a tad.
* There's also a good number of callbacks to the serieses. And while I enjoyed most of them, I think they may have gone a bit overboard on them.
Some mild generic spoilers here:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
* There's a real big Chekov's gun in the film that may as well have a sign reading "Chekov's Gun" when introduced. No, it doesn't relate to that Chekov.
More Mild spoilers:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

So, to sum up, I liked it, but it still left me a bit more amused than it probably should have.


Offline Charles Castle

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12721 on: May 16, 2013, 01:24:40 PM »
Film noir and the horror movie are kissing cousins. Both derive from the Gothic novel. Both derive their visual sensibilities from German expressionism. Neither sets out to reassure the audience or stroke their convictions that all is right with the world. Sometimes, as in The Leopard Man or Alias Nick Beal, the line between them is completely blurred. One of the movies from this twilight area between horror and film noir is Nightmare Alley (1947, directed by Edmund Goulding), one of the cinema’s blackest beasts. It's a film that plays like a lost Tod Browning film, with Tyrone Power in the Lon Chaney role. The film’s dramatic arc follows an irredeemable carny as he rises from the sideshow into high society, then back down as far as possible. Along the way, there are hints that there are sinister powers at work. Joan Blondell’s sideshow mentalist seems to have a real gift when she reads Tarot cards in private and Power’s Stanton Carlisle, a con-man in most respects, occasionally sees beyond what he can legitimately guess from cold reading of his marks. The film stages striking scenes that would work as horror set pieces were we not privy to the con behind them.

The film is in three acts, each corresponding to a different woman. The first act finds Stanton learning the con and accidentally killing the husband of his teacher (Blondell). There’s a certain cold-heartedness in the way Stanton moves into the partnership, but Stanton is nothing if not a cold-hearted grifter. The second act finds Stanton married to the Strongman’s ex-girlfriend (Coleen Gray)--and taking his mentalist act into nightclubs and high society. Neither Blondell nor Gray are traditional femmes fatale, though both assume the role at points, but the third woman in Stanton’s life, the psychiatrist Lilith Ritter (Helen Walker), is fatale to the core. She’s as cold and calculating as Stanton himself and the movie hints that her own profession is as much a con as Stanton’s. This progression charts an interesting evolution from superstition to science, and the film is skeptical of both. The downward spiral is steep for Stanton after Lilith gives him a shove off his peak. The central question asked by the film--early on and then at the end--is how does one become a geek? How deep is the bottom of the well? What circumstances will compel a man to debase himself in a cheap sideshow, biting the heads off of animals? At the end of the line, when Stanton is asked if he’s the man for the job, he says, “Mister, I was made for it...”

Perhaps the most shocking aspect of Nightmare Alley is the casting of Tyrone Power in the lead. This was one of Power’s personal projects, and like Dick Powell before him, he used the conventions of film noir to re-invent himself. Unlike Powell, who made the jump from matinee crooner to hard-boiled tough-guy as Raymond Chandler's knight-errant-in-a-fedora, Philip Marlowe, Power seems hell-bent for leather on utterly destroying his image as a matinee idol. Rarely has such a pretty leading man showed such coiling nastiness behind his eyes. Rarely has such a pretty boy type of leading man charted such depths of degradation, but that’s what gives the film its kick.

Of course, Daryl F. Zanuck would have none of this. He certainly wasn’t going to sit idly by as Power mutated into something other than a bankable leading man. He insisted on inserting a note of grace at the end of the film, a note completely at odds with everything that comes before it. It’s the same kind of cinematic mutilation we see in The Magnificent Ambersons and The Invasion of the Body Snatchers. Hollywood has never really learned that audiences don’t necessarily want happy endings. They want satisfying endings. Alas. As for Tyrone Power, the failure of the film--in part due to the studio’s lack of faith--sent him back to the swashbucklers and romances, though undercurrents of Stanton Carlisle occasionally resurface in his roles in The Prince of Foxes and Witness for the Prosecution. All of which leaves an audience to speculate about what might have been.
You know, if the space man puma thing turns out to be the correct religion, I for one will be very surprised.


Offline NRRork

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12722 on: May 17, 2013, 12:07:08 PM »
Star Trek Into Darkness

I finished seeing that about an hour ago. I really liked it, there's going to be no shortage of things for the hardcore fans to bitch about, but, they LOVE to do that even they don't realize it themselves. So, this will give the unpleaseable, cynical, asshole killjoys plenty to work with for awhile. It's just an unfortunate coincidence that these guys also dominate the internet, so, we'll be hearing about this for awhile. ;_;

Evil Sherlock was fantastic,
Spoiler (click to show/hide)


The plot, I liked it. There were a few problems I had, but none of them came close to ruining the experience for me, still, problems nonetheless:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
« Last Edit: May 17, 2013, 12:36:39 PM by NRRork »
I used to have an image here, but Photobucket got cheap about remote linking. I guess I'll have to think of something witty instead. Which I will. Later. It caught me by surprise, in all honesty. It's hard to be clever on command, I mean, YOU try it. Be funny: NOW! See, tough. So, gimme a bit, 'kay?


Offline The Snape

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12723 on: May 17, 2013, 12:08:14 PM »
Iron Man 3, thought it was a pretty mediocre money grab sequel that was many steps down from the 2nd. Best part was the Air Force One scene... Oh and also the line that should very well be the name of Robert Downey Jr's biography "one cheap trick and a cheesy one liner" I so hope they get around to riffing this over hyped sequel


Offline mrbasehart

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12724 on: May 17, 2013, 01:04:15 PM »
Film noir and the horror movie are kissing cousins. Both derive from the Gothic novel. Both derive their visual sensibilities from German expressionism. Neither sets out to reassure the audience or stroke their convictions that all is right with the world. Sometimes, as in The Leopard Man or Alias Nick Beal, the line between them is completely blurred. One of the movies from this twilight area between horror and film noir is Nightmare Alley (1947, directed by Edmund Goulding), one of the cinema’s blackest beasts. It's a film that plays like a lost Tod Browning film, with Tyrone Power in the Lon Chaney role. The film’s dramatic arc follows an irredeemable carny as he rises from the sideshow into high society, then back down as far as possible. Along the way, there are hints that there are sinister powers at work. Joan Blondell’s sideshow mentalist seems to have a real gift when she reads Tarot cards in private and Power’s Stanton Carlisle, a con-man in most respects, occasionally sees beyond what he can legitimately guess from cold reading of his marks. The film stages striking scenes that would work as horror set pieces were we not privy to the con behind them.

The film is in three acts, each corresponding to a different woman. The first act finds Stanton learning the con and accidentally killing the husband of his teacher (Blondell). There’s a certain cold-heartedness in the way Stanton moves into the partnership, but Stanton is nothing if not a cold-hearted grifter. The second act finds Stanton married to the Strongman’s ex-girlfriend (Coleen Gray)--and taking his mentalist act into nightclubs and high society. Neither Blondell nor Gray are traditional femmes fatale, though both assume the role at points, but the third woman in Stanton’s life, the psychiatrist Lilith Ritter (Helen Walker), is fatale to the core. She’s as cold and calculating as Stanton himself and the movie hints that her own profession is as much a con as Stanton’s. This progression charts an interesting evolution from superstition to science, and the film is skeptical of both. The downward spiral is steep for Stanton after Lilith gives him a shove off his peak. The central question asked by the film--early on and then at the end--is how does one become a geek? How deep is the bottom of the well? What circumstances will compel a man to debase himself in a cheap sideshow, biting the heads off of animals? At the end of the line, when Stanton is asked if he’s the man for the job, he says, “Mister, I was made for it...”

Perhaps the most shocking aspect of Nightmare Alley is the casting of Tyrone Power in the lead. This was one of Power’s personal projects, and like Dick Powell before him, he used the conventions of film noir to re-invent himself. Unlike Powell, who made the jump from matinee crooner to hard-boiled tough-guy as Raymond Chandler's knight-errant-in-a-fedora, Philip Marlowe, Power seems hell-bent for leather on utterly destroying his image as a matinee idol. Rarely has such a pretty leading man showed such coiling nastiness behind his eyes. Rarely has such a pretty boy type of leading man charted such depths of degradation, but that’s what gives the film its kick.

Of course, Daryl F. Zanuck would have none of this. He certainly wasn’t going to sit idly by as Power mutated into something other than a bankable leading man. He insisted on inserting a note of grace at the end of the film, a note completely at odds with everything that comes before it. It’s the same kind of cinematic mutilation we see in The Magnificent Ambersons and The Invasion of the Body Snatchers. Hollywood has never really learned that audiences don’t necessarily want happy endings. They want satisfying endings. Alas. As for Tyrone Power, the failure of the film--in part due to the studio’s lack of faith--sent him back to the swashbucklers and romances, though undercurrents of Stanton Carlisle occasionally resurface in his roles in The Prince of Foxes and Witness for the Prosecution. All of which leaves an audience to speculate about what might have been.

Tyrone Power is the prettiest man I've ever seen on screen.


Offline NRRork

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12725 on: May 17, 2013, 01:26:33 PM »
Judging by the way you completely flew off the handle there, I think you might've misunderstood "hardcore fan."

I wasn't referring to someone who really likes Star Trek. I was referring to someone who has an unhealthy obsession over it and nitpicks every little inconsistency and divergence.
I used to have an image here, but Photobucket got cheap about remote linking. I guess I'll have to think of something witty instead. Which I will. Later. It caught me by surprise, in all honesty. It's hard to be clever on command, I mean, YOU try it. Be funny: NOW! See, tough. So, gimme a bit, 'kay?


Offline NRRork

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12726 on: May 17, 2013, 01:44:04 PM »
Well then you misunderstood me even worse. It's perfectly valid to not like the direction J.J. Abrams took Star Trek. Even I get conflicted over it, because while I have fun at these movies, they don't really FEEL like Star Trek to me. But what IS on the screen, I enjoyed. It's okay to disagree with that.

But that's still not what I was talking about. I'm not talking about the themes or the tone or these plot as a whole, these are perfectly valid things to evaluate a movie on. But those aren't the things that get the people I'm talking about in an uproar. Look what's in my spoiler section, I have a couple examples in there of the very small things that a certain type of fan will just RIP INTO, and because of these minor things, THE WHOLE MOVIE NOW SUCKS!
I used to have an image here, but Photobucket got cheap about remote linking. I guess I'll have to think of something witty instead. Which I will. Later. It caught me by surprise, in all honesty. It's hard to be clever on command, I mean, YOU try it. Be funny: NOW! See, tough. So, gimme a bit, 'kay?


Offline NRRork

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12727 on: May 17, 2013, 01:59:56 PM »
Yeah, no hard feelings. ^_^ For what it's worth, I have similar things that can really get me mad.

Like, I turned 30 recently and I'm into video games, I have been since I was a kid. But so many people stereotype adult video game players as these sad, basement dwelling loners stuck in a perpetual adolescence. And since online multiplayer took of, now we get stereotyped as misogynistic, racist, and homophobic to boot. Are some like that? Sure, but as a reasonably-adjusted grown man, I get really angry when all of game-players get lumped together.

So, if you thought that's what I was doing, let me apologize as well, because I understand that feeling.
I used to have an image here, but Photobucket got cheap about remote linking. I guess I'll have to think of something witty instead. Which I will. Later. It caught me by surprise, in all honesty. It's hard to be clever on command, I mean, YOU try it. Be funny: NOW! See, tough. So, gimme a bit, 'kay?


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12728 on: May 17, 2013, 02:09:17 PM »
I hate the direction that Abrams has taken with the franchise. Seeing the comments he's made in the last few days ("Star Trek is too philosophical, so I fixed it") (paraphrase from his Daily Show interview), and seeing that he wanted all marketing and versions of the TOS universe to cease in favor of his version has just cemented that.  I find this behavior to be egotistical in the extreme, and I don't think his work merits it.

I watched that interview as well and was thinking the same things.  My opinion of JJ went down quite a bit during that.

Although to be fair, I'm sure he is just doing what the studio wants him to turn Trek into, look at the trailers for Star Trek and Mission Impossible, Trek is now just MI in space.

Rewatching STTNG on Blu-Ray, all the crazy rules Gene came up with might have pissed off the writers but it resulted in some really great stuff on screen.  And luckily there were people that stuck with most of those rules for a while after he passed so we got several more years of good stuff on screen.

Reading the spoilers I don't think this movie is as big a punch in the nads to the basic ideas of Star Trek as the first one, but I won't be watching this one either.   Maybe in a bunch of years I might feel like reading the book, I hate having to boycott anything written by Alan Dean Foster (he is one of my favorite authors), but I can't bring my self to even read the books for these things.


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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12729 on: May 17, 2013, 11:42:00 PM »


Of course, Daryl F. Zanuck would have none of this. He certainly wasn’t going to sit idly by as Power mutated into something other than a bankable leading man. He insisted on inserting a note of grace at the end of the film, a note completely at odds with everything that comes before it. It’s the same kind of cinematic mutilation we see in The Magnificent Ambersons and The Invasion of the Body Snatchers. Hollywood has never really learned that audiences don’t necessarily want happy endings. They want satisfying endings.

I hate it when they do that. I turn off the film "Tea and Sympathy" at the point where the play ended. I ignore the stupid tacked on Hollywood finish (because a cheating wife has to be shown to have suffered for her actions... which of course misses the point of the story entirely)

Another example of this is Louis B Mayer actually campaigning against a movie his studio made. The story goes that Louis disliked the realism and ambiguity of King Vidor’s "The Crowd", so he forced the filming of several new 'happy' endings. Thankfully audiences jeered at that these new ends in test screenings and the original was restored. Mayer was so pissed that he pressured Oscar voters not to pick Vidor's film and to chose Sunrise instead. Thus the integrity of the Academy Awards and the Hollywood studio system was establish early on. ;)


Offline Darth Geek

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12730 on: May 18, 2013, 06:53:57 PM »
The Greenskeeper - A 2002 low budget slasher flick. Very much a throwback to 80s slashers, but with the visual aesthetic of a 90s Nickelodean TV show. It's very fun to just sit back with a group of like minded friends and laugh and make comments. It's just b-maovie fun.



Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12731 on: May 18, 2013, 10:25:36 PM »
To Have and Have Not, can't count how many times I've watched it, wanted to see if the HD version on Amazon Prime was really HD, nope, I think my Blu-Ray player up-converting the DVD is slightly clearer...

Come on!  Get this out restored on Blu-Ray already!

MST3K: The Movie  The superHD version on Netflix, now this seems to have much more detail than the DVD, so it might be a real HD version.  It is out on region 2 Blu-Ray, so maybe this from that.


Offline Mrs. Dick Courier

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12732 on: May 18, 2013, 11:05:40 PM »
It Happened One Night

One of my fave movies of all time.  Funny, sexy, romantic.  Sigh....

Ted

Really enjoyed it. 
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Offline Kete

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12733 on: May 19, 2013, 06:46:24 AM »
Star Trek Into Darkness

I really liked it.  I thought Benedict was great.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Compound-I thought there were fewer lens flares in this one than the first one. That's funny that we had different impressions of it.

I think when JJ says that the original show was more philosophical he's referring to the show being mostly people talking.  There are usually very few actions scenes in the original.  The movies have action scenes, and people talking, and moral dilemmas!

 


Offline Kete

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12734 on: May 19, 2013, 07:00:15 AM »
Oh a couple other things about Star Trek.

I can't believe that I wasn't spoiled about
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Did anyone know that before going in?

Also, I think JJ must really hate the Star Trek universe because
Spoiler (click to show/hide)