Author Topic: What was the last movie you watched?  (Read 1583657 times)

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MightyJack

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12600 on: April 15, 2013, 07:12:45 AM »
The Seassions
Rather slight but affecting and funny story about a man with polio who hires a sex surrogate because he’s never been with a woman. The strength of the picture is it’s warm and authentic performances.

The final act was a bit abrupt, I felt like they could have gone a little deeper with the transition from his time with the surrogate to his time after. But it’s a minor quibble as the picture works more often than not.

Also: The bit with the Priest could have been cartoonish or clichéd, but William H. Macy is such a strong actor that he gives the character dignity and makes him a well-rounded caring individual, rather than a blatant punch line.


Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12601 on: April 15, 2013, 02:18:23 PM »
Yeah - Not an amazing picture, but I still enjoyed The Sessions far more than I thought I would. Agree with everything you said.
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Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12602 on: April 17, 2013, 05:46:14 AM »

Wages of Fear - Might be the single most tense movie I've ever seen. Set in a South American town where an American mining company has moved in, a bunch of deadbeats are struggling to get enough money to escape the town. An explosion occurs at one of the mines, 300 miles from the town. The mining company offers $2000 per driver for people to drive nitro glycerine to the site to put the fire out. The problem is, the roads are in miserable shape and the trucks aren't really equipped to carry the nitro, so there is a high likelihood of death. My wife and I loved this film. It has been remade in English twice, though I have never seen the remakes. [ur=http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0076740/l]The 1977 version was directed by William Friedkin and seems to be pretty well regarded. Might have to check it out.

This is such a great movie.  I love everything about it.  It's such a simple tense movie about men who go very fucking far for riches.  I've never seen the directors other films (like Diabolique), but I would love too.


Offline Charles Castle

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12603 on: April 17, 2013, 02:21:52 PM »
This was among the Blu Ray I considered buying today, but the reviews say the sound quality on it isn't so great, so I bought some others instead (Scarlet Street, Le Mépris, Le Cercle Rouge, Diabolique and Panic in the Streets)
Yeah, the Blu Ray is not a huge step up from dvd. I love each of those films you got, especially Scarlet Street and Le Cercle Rouge.
You know, if the space man puma thing turns out to be the correct religion, I for one will be very surprised.


MightyJack

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12604 on: April 17, 2013, 11:47:32 PM »
^ Love Scarlet Street (and Woman in the Window) Never saw Le Cercle - I've had mixed reactions to Melville. Thought Le Samourai was incredible, but wasn't feeling Army in the Shadows, which many people consider his best. It never sprung to life for me the way Samourai did... its cool reserve didn't fit as well. Might have to give it a second chance some day.


Cosmopolis
David Cronenberg returns to the strange. Robert Pattinson plays a Wall Street hotshot who –while on a limo ride to get a haircut- slowly watches his life and empire come crumbling down around him. The film is icy, thought provoking, bleak, funny – it doesn’t have a story so to speak, dialog at times seems riddled with non sequiturs or random lines (“Put a stick of gum in your mouth and try not to chew it”) which upon closer reflection, actually mean something. It sounds like Beatnik poetry -- it reminds me of Godard, in the way it goes for tone and idea rather than concrete narrative  (Though that’s a deceptive notion as this isn’t free form/improvised)

It wont be for everyone (I imagine reviews ranging from glowing to scathing) but it fit my sensibilities to a T. I thought it was bloody brilliant; I especially liked the scenes between the protagonist and his wife (she reminded me of a Hitchcock blond), who are near strangers to one another. He’s such disconnected figure, hiding in that shell of a limo, and that echoes in his marriage.

Now I want to read the book.




Offline Charles Castle

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12605 on: April 19, 2013, 06:08:06 PM »
I watched the Criterion edition of The Burmese Harp (1956, Kon Ichikawa), which is as warm and humane a film as I’ve ever seen that contains valleys of burned and dessicated corpses. The film follows a Japanese soldier who has learned to play a harp native to the Burmese, and his platoon, in the final days and aftermath of World War II. His Captain--a music teacher in civilian life--has taught the platoon to sing as a means of lifting their morale as they march to escape the Japanese defeat, but they are cornered in a village by the British, who return their song with a chorus “There’s No Place Like Home.” The war is over, and the reconciliation must begin. Our hero, Mizushima, is asked to help bring the surrender of an entrenched battalion, but after he fails, he is left for dead to wander the countryside, where he sees the horror left by the war and vows to stay to bury the dead. The overall tone is elegiac and Mizushima’s spiritual transformation is unutterably sad. This is par for the course for Japanese anti-war films, which reach depths of emotion that similar American films have never been able to touch. Defeat will do that to a nation, I guess. Ichikawa is among the finest Japanese directors when it comes to composing the film frame and this film reflects that. Music is extremely important to this film--hell, it’s practically a musical--so it doesn’t hurt that it’s provided by the great Akira Ifukube.

********

Seconds
(1966, John Frankenheimer) was made right on the threshold as the old Hollywood was giving way to the new, a transformation that is underscored by the movie's central conceit of body renewal, making the old and flabby young and firm once again. The film seems to be in a strange, impossible dialogue (think of Orlok and Ellen in Nosferatu) with Teshigahara's The Face of Another, made halfway around the world the same year, both utilizing similar tropes and featuring bizarre, experimental visuals, all the while drawing deeply unsettling conclusions about modern society. Seconds in particular displays a production line world of egos and consumers that is as internally dead as it is hollow. The details are very telling: a banker (played by the blacklisted John Randolph) dictating letters of financial denial with "the usual endings" he's written time and again makes his way past a slaughterhouse full of butchered carcasses to find a company that literally trades in human flesh, offering Faustian pacts to financially stable men who have turned their backs on 'the dreams of youth,' allowing them a new beginning that is as artificial as it is ideal. It's a pretty damning portrait of capitalism, particularly in its presentation of this devilish company that blackmails clients into buying life itself, but also in the living death that seems emblematic of a society creating human fodder for this machine. The twisted images of flesh that opens the movie ultimately point to a society whose values have been twisted into something horrific. And this feeling of horror is felt throughout the film thanks to James Wong Howe's use of extreme wide angled lenses, fish-eyes, uncomfortable close-ups, and other expressionistic camera effects which then gives way to this new wave Dionysian scene of free-spirited inebriation and eroticism at the film's center, an indoctrination into a new lifestyle that is ironically (and perhaps muddling the film's clarity) no less vapid than the cookie cutter production line world we've seen up to this point. One of the most noteworthy American movies of the 1960s.


 
You know, if the space man puma thing turns out to be the correct religion, I for one will be very surprised.


Offline Nunyerbiz

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12606 on: April 22, 2013, 10:43:11 AM »
Oz The Great and Powerful

Franco sorta coasts through most of the proceedings with a weird stoner smirk on his face... and Mila Kunis tries damn hard to be a wicked witch, but only occasionally hits the mark. Rachael Weisz is the standout among the cast, delivering a great manipulative bitch. The story and visuals work well enough... and there are a decent amount of light hearted laughs to be had. Certainly not a bad movie by any stretch... but only an epic in regards to the CGI budget.

Space Jam

The gripping tale of Michael Jordan's one year suspension from the NBA due to an uncontrollable gambling habit... or not. The Looney Tunes are in fine form here, even with that weird "that's not Mel Blanc!!" vibe from the voice work. His Airness does a respectable job in front of the camera considering he's a non-actor. Bill Murray shows up for a fun cameo and mails in a bunch of typical Bill Murray schtick... Which is to say he's goddamn brilliant without even giving a shit enough to try... fuckin Bill Murray... future generations will wonder why we didn't abandon democracy and simply install him as the supreme overlord. Oh yea... and the good guys win, the bad guys loose... and there are lots of shots of Jordan doing warm-ups that eventually had cartoon characters added in post production. I also got some laughs from the 90s crop of NBA stars getting their talents 'stolen' by the bad buy aliens... Patrick Ewing getting bonked in the head because he can no longer catch a basketball!?!! Gold right there my friends... My two young sons (ages 5 & 7) love Looney Tunes and enjoyed this quite a bit when I found it on the HBO On-Demand channel.


Offline Kete

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12607 on: April 22, 2013, 12:21:53 PM »
This Is 40
My wife recently put on Knocked Up, and I found that I could not enjoy it.  When I first saw it, I really liked it, but I also didn't know who Katherine Heigl was.  On my rewatch, I also found that I didn't like thinking about Seth Rogen doing it.  The only parts I enjoyed were the scenes with Paul Rudd.  So I figured I better watch This Is 40.  I really like it.  Leslie Mann had some annoying moments, but I could handle it.  Paul Rudd is awesome as you'd expect.  I just find these characters so much more interesting than the Knocked Up characters.


MightyJack

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12608 on: April 23, 2013, 01:32:41 AM »
The Master
It has several great performances and several great sequences, at times I thought it was the best thing since sliced bread… but in the end it doesn't coalesce into a great film. As with Anderson's previous efforts The Master explores the complexities of the human condition, but it isn’t as successful in giving those complexities weight and resonance. It's not that I disliked the movie but at the end I just shrugged, “yeah, whatever” and that's the completely opposite reaction I had with Magnolia and There Will Be Blood. You could hate those films, or love them, but apathy wasn't an option.

Bringing Up Baby
Howard Hawk's uproarious screwball comedy is boosted by Cary Grant's pitch perfect comedic performance. Katherine Hepburn's pretty good too (though unlike Grant, she has an off moment or two). The first half of the movie is flawless, crazy but tight. I feel it stumbles a shade at the end in the jail as it loses its precise timing and just piles on the chaos and noise. I have to agree with Hawk's who felt he made a mistake making everyone crazy - it might have been better to have a few straight men at the end. Still, on the whole it’s a win and remains one of my favorites.


Offline Nunyerbiz

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12609 on: April 23, 2013, 09:01:28 AM »
Snitch

The Rock in a somewhat legitimate acting role? This is going to hurt... That was my initial reaction when strolling into the dollar show... But damn if I wasn't proven wrong. I supposed it has to do with having lowered expectations heading into the thing, but this was a solid movie. The performances across the board are pretty good with Barry Pepper, Jon Bernthal and Susan Saradon all doing some heavy lifting support for the star. Speaking of which, the people behind the scenes were smart enough to not ask Mr. The Rock to do too much. The script has it's cliche moments, BUT WHAT ABOUT YOUR FAMILY!! and the like as the hero gets in too deep... and things did get a tad Hollywood retard at the end, with explosions and gun fights and car crashes. I got a feeling the true story that this was "inspired by" probably had a lot less Mexican drug runner corpses involved. Still, it's a decent little thriller... maybe slightly heavy handed at times while pointing out the overall ludicrousness of America's second attempt at prohibition... but an entertaining watch. Would easily recommended for a dollar show or 'nothin else to do' rental material.


Offline Charles Castle

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12610 on: April 23, 2013, 08:47:36 PM »
During the summer between my senior year of high school and my first year of college, I had a temporary gig assembling and disassembling a carnival. The carnival was set-up right outside the boundaries of a Marine base--a shrewd location given the paucity of things for bored young servicemen to do in the vicinity. They raked in a ton of G.I. cash. I had an interesting view of it. I wasn't a carny, but I got to move among them. The day workers they had were paid out of a trailer that doubled as an armored truck, and inside that trailer was an arsenal. There was also a drug concession, of course, and a fair amount of prostitution. There wasn't a freak show, but it was the sort of operation that would have HAD a freak show even five years earlier. It was pretty seedy, actually. After assembling and dismantling the various attractions at this carnival, I vowed that I would never, ever ride another carnival ride again. Ever. You know the cars at the end of the arms of The Octopus? They're held on by a single cotter pin. Or were at this particular carnival, anyway. The guns and the drugs made me uncomfortable, too. It's no wonder that Tod Browning set so many of his movies in a carnival.

This was all in my head as I watched Tobe Hooper's The Funhouse (1981), a film that gets the ambiance of the carnival exactly right. This is something that I didn't know when I first saw the movie way back when it was first on cable. I hadn't worked the carnival yet. I remember disliking the grottiness of its setting, which turns out to have been a stupid opinion on my part. A horror movie is not obliged to polish off its rough edges to make its audience comfortable, after all, and if it knows what it's doing--and this one does--it can use that discomfort to its advantage. It's the same kind of trick that Hooper pulled in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: the mood is everything.

(adding spoilers because of the length)

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
« Last Edit: April 23, 2013, 09:49:31 PM by Charles Hussein Castle »
You know, if the space man puma thing turns out to be the correct religion, I for one will be very surprised.


Offline Starman!

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12611 on: April 24, 2013, 01:10:27 PM »
Big Trouble in Little China. I usually like John Carpenter's films a lot but I don't get what makes this one so special.


Offline Relaxing Dragon

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12612 on: April 24, 2013, 02:08:14 PM »
Big Trouble in Little China. I usually like John Carpenter's films a lot but I don't get what makes this one so special.

Nostalgia. I think it's a fun movie, but I agree it's over-praised.

I don't usually like to play the "because it's awesome!" card, since it's a largely meaningless and empty descriptor, but I'll have to on this one. It's one of my favorite movies, and I haven't got any nostalgic feelings for it, what with me a) not being nearly old enough and b) not having even seen it for the first time until a few years ago.

From a more objective standpoint, it's a very fun, unique, and weirdly fantasy-tinged send-up of action movies (remember, despite what Jack thinks, he's actually the sidekick of this story). Carpenter pretty much ruled the 80s (even if it didn't seem like it at the time), and this was one reason why.


Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12613 on: April 24, 2013, 03:54:51 PM »
The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

A very surprising film, not at all what I would have guessed from the description of the film. Fascinatingly skips over many 'big' events, and puts importance on other things that most other film makers wouldn't. Took us three or four sittings to watch it because of the baby, so I am really keen to watch it in one sitting (in a few years, I guess :P)

Tremendous performances too, The Colonel could have quite easily been ridiculous, but you really accept/care about him quite quickly in the film. And the end..!

We're really becoming fans of The Archers, having really enjoyed The Red Shoes recently.
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Offline Tripe

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Re: What was the last movie you watched?
« Reply #12614 on: April 24, 2013, 03:58:18 PM »
Ever read the Flashman books by any chance?