Author Topic: What are you reading at the moment  (Read 222651 times)

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Offline CJones

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Re: What are you reading at the moment
« Reply #2295 on: January 11, 2017, 01:15:59 AM »
I read most, including the entire second half, of Watership Down in one sitting. Granted, I was on a cross country plane trip, but the book was a lot more engrossing than I expected. Now yes, I had seen the movie already, so I knew not to expect a children's book (even though the original story was made up for his daughter). But the book goes into a LOT more detail about the rabbits' social structure, first describing their starting "normal" warren so that when they run into Cowslip's Warren, and then ultimately Efrafa, you can see how very out of the ordinary things have become, forcing Hazel and his Warren to adapt.

And I found it brilliantly believable. With the exception of Fiver's apparently psychic powers, these were rabbits acting like rabbits, forced into extraordinary situations, where they must view the world in ways they never had means or reason to before. And in the end, they come out better for it, because they accumulate knowledge, and they accumulate advantages. Because of everything that happens to them, they learn how to deal with the unknown, culminating in the final confrontation with General Woundwort and Efrafa. 


Online Johnny Unusual

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Re: What are you reading at the moment
« Reply #2296 on: January 11, 2017, 06:39:41 AM »
Midway through How Star Wars Conquered the Universe.  Despite the bland title, it is a good history covering the making of the Star Wars films, how they were received and how they effected the world as a whole.  I recommend it for Star Wars nerds, its a solid read.


Offline Alexis

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Re: What are you reading at the moment
« Reply #2297 on: January 18, 2017, 07:12:41 AM »
Soar Above: How to Use the Most Profound Part of Your Brain under Any Kind of Stress by Steven Stosny. Helps to understand and manage oneself (to some extent).


Offline BathTub

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Re: What are you reading at the moment
« Reply #2298 on: January 23, 2017, 02:19:09 PM »
40/41, only 1 more discworld novel left. :(


Online Johnny Unusual

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Re: What are you reading at the moment
« Reply #2299 on: January 23, 2017, 04:35:29 PM »
Wow, that's quite an accomplishment.  Pratchett is really someone I need to get in to.  I like a lot of what I hear.


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: What are you reading at the moment
« Reply #2300 on: January 23, 2017, 07:25:47 PM »
 Wow, I've only read 9 of them I think, at the rate I'm going I doubt I'll live long enough to read all of them.  ;D

 They have all been fun to read, I do need to get a few more of them on my Kindle....


Offline BathTub

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Re: What are you reading at the moment
« Reply #2301 on: February 02, 2017, 12:17:44 AM »
Holy fuck The Shepherd's Crown, I can't stop bawling my eyes out reading this one, I'm in no state for it. 


Offline Jesse412

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Re: What are you reading at the moment
« Reply #2302 on: July 13, 2017, 02:03:35 PM »
Recently I finished reading Moby Dick which took a long time to read and the damn white whale didn't even show up until the last few chapters.

I started reading the fifth Jack Reacher novel Echo Burning by Lee Child. I've already read (and for the most part enjoyed) the first four Jack Reacher books; Running Blind, Tripwire, Die Trying and Killing Floor. They are fast paced, action thrillers that I feel fans of classic action movies might enjoy.

I've got quite a few other books in my "To Read" pile already. I've started Noble House Volume 1 by James Clavell after really enjoying his previous book Shōgun.

I've also started Kim by Rudyard Kipling which appears in a two volume collection of his short stories and poems.

I also recently reread the first book in the Foundation series by Isaac Asimov and I'm half way through the second book Foundation and Empire. Just getting to the second part of the novel that introduces The Mule.

I've also got copies of The Clan of the Cave Bear and The Plains of Passage by Jean M. Auel but not the two books that occur between them in the Earth's Children series. I'm wondering if anyone has read this series and what their thoughts are.
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Online Johnny Unusual

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Re: What are you reading at the moment
« Reply #2303 on: August 02, 2017, 05:47:37 PM »
I'm reading Trevor Noah's Born a Crime.  I sort of fell off with the Daily Show, but I'm enjoying this book a fair amount.


Offline Jesse412

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Re: What are you reading at the moment
« Reply #2304 on: August 05, 2017, 02:10:43 PM »
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
by Philip K. Dick



I've been meaning to read this for awhile now and am glad I finally got around to doing so.  Once I started reading it I had a hard time putting it down and ending up binge reading it over the last few days.  Initially I wanted to judge it on its own and not compare it to the film but I found that virtually impossible.  While there are obviously similarities I thought the book was different in many ways and I was able to really enjoy reading it.  I think one of the main differences was the concept of Mercerism and using empathy boxes I don't think that made it into the film in any form.
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Offline Jesse412

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Re: What are you reading at the moment
« Reply #2305 on: August 17, 2017, 10:31:30 AM »
Echo Burning

by Lee Child



The fifth Jack Reacher novel the author keeps coming up with unique and interesting scenarios for his action hero.  Reacher hitchhiking leads to a series of events including multiple murders, spousal abuse, conspiracy and kidnapping.  In this story the setting is an oppressive force of nature, Texas during a heat wave. Locals keep mentioning that a storm is coming and the mystery and tension builds up to the climax where Reacher confronts a team of killers during a torrential thunderstorm, one of which has kidnapped his friend's daughter.
"It is wrong to assume that art needs the spectator in order to be. The film runs on without any eyes. The spectator cannot exist without it. It ensures his existence." -- James Douglas Morrison


Offline SJP

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Re: What are you reading at the moment
« Reply #2306 on: August 17, 2017, 12:15:00 PM »
Recently I finished reading Moby Dick which took a long time to read and the damn white whale didn't even show up until the last few chapters.

I read that for a high school class.  We had the choice of reading three short books, two medium books, or a really long book, and do reports on them.  I decided to go for the one long one.  Later, for a college course, as a throwaway I mentioned how long Moby Dick is, and how Melville devoted an entire chapter to the different kinds of whales that exist.  The professor didn't believe me that the chapter was in the book. ;)

On the one hand, it's not a book I think a lot of people can get into; it is very long, not very focused in terms of a plot, and written in that 1800s style that can be very wordy.  On the other, I still think it was a well-written book and despite doing it for a class project I enjoyed it immensely.  I just had no idea when I started it that the fight against Moby Dick is practically an afterthought, and most of it is just a story about whalers and the lives they led.
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