Author Topic: Pets  (Read 97597 times)

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Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: Pets
« Reply #480 on: June 03, 2012, 10:40:12 AM »
And we have a Gecko (not sure if it's a real Gecko but a simple bright green lizard) hanging around the house as well  :o

It looks like a green anole (Anolis carolinensis).  We often get them for students to do projects with.  Pretty easy to keep, a few crickets every few days.


Offline LucasM

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Re: Pets
« Reply #481 on: June 03, 2012, 10:49:50 AM »
Just did an update on our bunny.. ;D
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/OOdSTyGxCgY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/OOdSTyGxCgY</a>

Superb pen you built!  From the video, it definitely looks like you're 'Hooked on Bonyx'.


Maybe add the cedar chips to the dog box now, so that he's not so used to using it as a bathroom by then that when Winter comes he can't make the conceptual change.
To dispel some of the misconceptions about head injuries you have developed from watching movies and TV, I wrote this: ...Some Information on Head Injury Effects


Offline LucasM

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Re: Pets
« Reply #482 on: June 03, 2012, 11:12:35 AM »
Our cats are currently battling fleas, and it's a miserable experience for everyone in the house. We put the flea medicine (I think Frontline) on them yesterday, but I really hate using that since it makes them so sick.

Following idea originated in a book called "Save Our Planet: 750 Everyday Ways You Can Help Clean Up the Earth".

If you are REALLY careful with it (i.e. don't 'poof' it in the air, and don't put on so much that, by scratching, your cats can) the best flea-killer is all natural.  Go to a pet shop FISH department, and get "Diatom Filter Powder" (aka 'diatomaceous earth').  It is basically powdered, fossilized diatoms.  But, on a very small scale (that of insects) it is like razor wire.  It scratches the protective waxy coating on their carapaces, and they simply dehydrate and die.  To you, and the cat, it will feel basically like slightly-gritty talc.  It does nothing at all if swallowed, but is not good to get into one's lungs.

To use it for fleas on a pet: put a very small amount on the tips of the fingers on one hand, lift the fur around the back of the neck and shoulders of the cat so that skin shows, and gently rub it onto the skin, making sure not to get puffs of it into the air, and minimal amounts on the fur itself.  You don't need to apply it all over the cat (or dog, if someone else is trying this) it appears applying it just around the neck is adequate, as the fleas move around enough to get to it.

The ONE time that Omaha had fleas, I used that ONCE, and the next morning I looked in one of the areas she would sleep during the day (countertop by a bathroom sink) and there was a bunch of dead fleas there, and she no longer scratched at herself.

WARNING: since this stuff is basically 'sharp rock', you do NOT want it getting in either your - or your pets' - lungs.  That is the reason for the 'don't use so much your pet can poof it in the air if scratching'.

CAUTION: while it may also be used for indoor insects (ants in kitchens, for instance) don't keep it out where it can get blown into the air.  Put it behind the kickboard of floor cabinets, for instance.  But NEVER use it outdoors, as it will kill beneficial bugs that are essential to proper workings of dirt and gardens.

[[Edited to remove irrelevant comment.]]
« Last Edit: October 31, 2012, 09:49:56 PM by LucasM »
To dispel some of the misconceptions about head injuries you have developed from watching movies and TV, I wrote this: ...Some Information on Head Injury Effects


Offline RVR II

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Re: Pets
« Reply #483 on: June 03, 2012, 11:13:22 AM »
And we have a Gecko (not sure if it's a real Gecko but a simple bright green lizard) hanging around the house as well  :o

It looks like a green anole (Anolis carolinensis).  We often get them for students to do projects with.  Pretty easy to keep, a few crickets every few days.
:o That may be it!

Just did an update on our bunny.. ;D
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Superb pen you built!  From the video, it definitely looks like you're 'Hooked on Bonyx'.


Maybe add the cedar chips to the dog box now, so that he's not so used to using it as a bathroom by then that when Winter comes he can't make the conceptual change.
Thanks! 8)
Ah ok, might do that then..

Just made this one.. :D :D

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/y-tSy84NcWY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/y-tSy84NcWY</a>


Offline Bob

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Re: Pets
« Reply #484 on: June 03, 2012, 11:25:38 AM »
Those pancakes looked like little Gameras......


Offline RVR II

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Re: Pets
« Reply #485 on: June 03, 2012, 11:28:13 AM »
Those pancakes looked like little Gameras......
That's Friggin Hilarious Bob!! :clap: :clap:


Offline wurwolf

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Re: Pets
« Reply #486 on: June 03, 2012, 11:47:06 AM »
Our cats are currently battling fleas, and it's a miserable experience for everyone in the house. We put the flea medicine (I think Frontline) on them yesterday, but I really hate using that since it makes them so sick.

Following idea originated in a book called "Save Our Planet: 750 Everyday Ways You Can Help Clean Up the Earth".

If you are REALLY careful with it (i.e. don't 'poof' it in the air, and don't put on so much that, by scratching, your cats can) the best flea-killer is all natural.  Go to a pet shop FISH department, and get "Diatom Filter Powder" (aka 'diatomaceous earth').  It is basically powdered, fossilized diatoms.  But, on a very small scale (that of insects) it is like razor wire.  It scratches the protective waxy coating on their carapaces, and they simply dehydrate and die.  To you, and the cat, it will feel basically like slightly-gritty talc.  It does nothing at all if swallowed, but is not good to get into one's lungs.

To use it for fleas on a pet: put a very small amount on the tips of the fingers on one hand, lift the fur around the back of the neck and shoulders of the cat so that skin shows, and gently rub it onto the skin, making sure not to get puffs of it into the air, and minimal amounts on the fur itself.  You don't need to apply it all over the cat (or dog, if someone else is trying this) it appears applying it just around the neck is adequate, as the fleas move around enough to get to it.

The ONE time that Omaha had fleas, I used that ONCE, and the next morning I looked in one of the areas she would sleep during the day (countertop by a bathroom sink) and there was a bunch of dead fleas there, and she no longer scratched at herself.

WARNING: since this stuff is basically 'sharp rock', you do NOT want it getting in either your - or your pets' - lungs.  That is the reason for the 'don't use so much your pet can poof it in the air if scratching'.

CAUTION: while it may also be used for indoor insects (ants in kitchens, for instance) don't keep it out where it can get blown into the air.  Put it behind the kickboard of floor cabinets, for instance.  But NEVER use it outdoors, as it will kill beneficial bugs that are essential to proper workings of dirt and gardens.


[crap... slept about 12 hours last night as I was so exhausted, but focusing to write this has already resulted in fuzzy thinking again, even though I've written it for multiple people over the years, so no 'new' thinking involved.  :(  (back to my self-imposed 'silence' to try to recover some more, I guess)]


This is amazing information. I don't worry so much about using Frontline and the like on Todd because he is younger and a lot more hardy than Kitty -- I mostly worry about using it on her because she's twelve years old and I don't want to use toxic materials on her unless absolutely necessary.

The diatomaceous earth is something Imrahil and I talked about before for use in gardens as a pest control. I never thought about using it for fleas. My biggest fear is accidentally overusing it and then finding it's just as toxic to Kitty as the flea and tick prevention oils are.

Still, those oils make both of the cats sick. When we put it on them they are low key and acting sick for several hours and that really bothers me (as well as them).

I googled diatomaceous earth as a flea prevention and everything I've seen suggests getting food grade. I'll see what we can find and let you know how it goes.
Bonhead #2
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Offline mattwnelson

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Re: Pets
« Reply #487 on: June 03, 2012, 12:15:54 PM »
Will this stuff work on spiders? I get spiders like you wouldn't believe.


Offline mattwnelson

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Re: Pets
« Reply #488 on: June 03, 2012, 12:21:20 PM »
Yeah, I know they're not insects, but arachnids and insects aren't built too dissimilarly. Still, you have a point about not using it inside unless absolutely necessary... but dang if sometimes it doesn't FEEL necessary with my own personal Giant Spider Invasion.


Offline Darth Geek

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Re: Pets
« Reply #489 on: June 03, 2012, 12:24:25 PM »
Based on the description LucasM gave on how it works, I would guess the spiders would not be small enough for it to work the same way on them.



Offline wurwolf

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Re: Pets
« Reply #490 on: June 03, 2012, 12:58:32 PM »
Well, not so sure about that. It can be an irritant to humans and animals if inhaled, so I imagine it's most likely fatal to spiders as well.
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Offline Bob

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Re: Pets
« Reply #491 on: June 03, 2012, 01:15:39 PM »
So, the rest of this year I will be working about 8 days a month in Chicago, so I need the best way to watch for my dog.   I have a 65 pound doberman who has a LOT of energy and doberman mental.

Last week, I used the really nice Kennel (the client will pay for it!) about a quarter mile from my house that has a nice seperate room with a dog door that leads into her own yard.   They feed them and play with them three times a day.  Rest of the time, they probably just sleep.   The people up there are young and like dogs.

Since I am single, my only other option would be get a dog sitter that comes over twice a day and feeds my dog.  I think this is just leaving a 5 year old doberman in a BAD situation.   I can see her smashing through the front window or what if she gets sick?

Any thoughts if Kennel is the right call?

Thanks.


Offline Tripe

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Re: Pets
« Reply #492 on: June 03, 2012, 01:45:56 PM »
Last week, I used the really nice Kennel (the client will pay for it!) about a quarter mile from my house that has a nice seperate room with a dog door that leads into her own yard.   They feed them and play with them three times a day.  Rest of the time, they probably just sleep.   The people up there are young and like dogs.
So, she's been there before and liked it? We thought about kenneling ours for a trip once. The place was actually part of the vets they go to and it was just like you describe. So I took them along to see how they would do. Jemmy didn't seem to mind, Boo on the other hand seemed to visibly crumple and seemed traumatised to even be walking through the place, so back to Ann's parents they went when it was time to travel.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2012, 01:53:45 PM by Tripe H. Redux »


Offline Bob

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Re: Pets
« Reply #493 on: June 03, 2012, 02:08:24 PM »
Yeah, as a doberman, she does not really want to be around other dogs, so I made sure the kennel place had "exectutive rooms" that did not have them touch face with other dogs.   The place really is so close to me and has been around for a year.   If need be, their is an unrelated Vet just across the street.   The room she gets is in a quieter larger room.

Below is the website of the place and you can see it reads well.......and they are good so far.

http://mydogsdayinn.com/


Offline LucasM

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Re: Pets
« Reply #494 on: June 03, 2012, 05:56:26 PM »
[diatomaceous earth]
This is amazing information. I don't worry so much about using Frontline and the like on Todd because he is younger and a lot more hardy than Kitty -- I mostly worry about using it on her because she's twelve years old and I don't want to use toxic materials on her unless absolutely necessary.

The diatomaceous earth is something Imrahil and I talked about before for use in gardens as a pest control. I never thought about using it for fleas. My biggest fear is accidentally overusing it and then finding it's just as toxic to Kitty as the flea and tick prevention oils are.

Still, those oils make both of the cats sick. When we put it on them they are low key and acting sick for several hours and that really bothers me (as well as them).

I googled diatomaceous earth as a flea prevention and everything I've seen suggests getting food grade. I'll see what we can find and let you know how it goes.

[Three hours awake during which I wrote a couple posts here, then three more sleeping... I'd best try to keep this very short.  EDIT: HAH!  Yeah, that worked well....]

Depending on the younger cats' age, standard oil-suspension flea control could potentially be more damaging to the younger cat (as neuronal/brain formation can be disrupted).  Last time I looked into them (the last time I needed to: about 20 years ago [they may be different now, but I kinda' doubt it]) I believe the liquid flea treatments' active ingredient was neurotoxins.  And neurotoxins will kill neurons, no matter what species they occur in.  So not good for cats (who, obviously, ingest the stuff in pretty large quantities as they clean themselves) or the humans who have contact with them (who also will likely ingest some, either post-petting a cat, or from touching a place the cat has been sitting).  [Prior to finding the stuff, Omaha would foam at the mouth after getting treated with the oil-based ones.  That's the same immediate result as ingesting rat poison.]

Given my neuropsych training I am very much against any neurotoxins being in my house, much less directly applied onto living creatures I care about.

My understanding has been that the potential side effects of the diatomaceous earth might be local skin irritation (which would end when the stuff falls/washes off).  More serious ones should only only occur if it is used in large quantities so that a LOT gets into the lungs.  Those might be lung irritation (that might not be able to be relieved since what is basically stone wouldn't break down), or the albino equivalent of 'black lung' ('albino', since diatomaceous earth is white, while coal is obviously black).  But you'd have to cake the stuff on to get to that point.  [The reason it's applied to the back of the neck and between the shoulders is cats have a harder time reaching these areas and get enough leverage to potentially poof it into the air much.  So if one only uses what sticks to the end of your fingers to begin with, that's unlikely.]

It is probably slightly worse than talcum powder (which should not be used on infants, and certainly not 'poofed' in the air), as the diatomaceous earth likely has sharper edges, but both have the same result in the lungs: they never break down.  [Some time ago I read that it was suspected that use of talc on babies was one of the reasons contributing to the increase in asthma over the last 50 years.  (Because no one said, "hey: don't poof this up in a cloud around your kid when you're changing it".]

I'd never heard of 'food grade' diatomaceous earth before.  Only food grade stones I'm familiar with are things like NaCl, KCl, and the occasional med (e.g. LiCl).

[Yup, gotta stop writing.  [And so much for the idea of 'short' once I started.]  Took more concentration than anticipated to write this, had to edit the crap out of it to get it coherent.]


EDIT:  (For the spider discussion.)  It may not work on them since their legs are long enough where their bodies can't touch and scrape against it (unless you know of a place the spiders have to squeeze into, like, between a floorboard and the wall).

As long as it isn't out in the open, or not able to be stirred by wind (e.g. near a windowframe or air duct) it is unlikely to come into contact with anyone's lungs, so pretty much inert.


I bought some food grade diatomaceous earth on Amazon recently.  Avoid contact not just with lungs but any mucous membranes is what the packaging said.

Damn!  And here I was thinking about adding it to KY jelly and marketing that for 'crabs' protection!  ;)


But I suppose it is necessary these days to say, "don't stick small jagged rocks in your eyes," and, "don't snort tiny stone razor wire - you won't get high off of it."  :P
« Last Edit: June 03, 2012, 08:07:18 PM by LucasM »
To dispel some of the misconceptions about head injuries you have developed from watching movies and TV, I wrote this: ...Some Information on Head Injury Effects