Author Topic: Pets  (Read 86492 times)

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Offline LucasM

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Re: Pets
« Reply #990 on: December 15, 2017, 03:09:12 AM »


This didn't go in the 'Particularly Amusing Cartoon' thread, because honestly, it's not particularly amusing... it just happens to be reasonable. :)
To dispel some of the misconceptions about head injuries you have developed from watching movies and TV, I wrote this: ...Some Information on Head Injury Effects


Offline LucasM

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Re: Pets
« Reply #991 on: January 12, 2018, 06:35:10 PM »
I was just reading comments on a Facebook page, and multiple people commented on their distress at shocking their pets with static with the extreme cold and consequent low house humidity. So I thought I'd share this.

In some electronics stores (and online), one can find 'static discharge pads' that are self-adhesive. These are generally used for electronics safety, but I'm expanding their usefulness here. Some of them are as small as 2x2", but regardless of size, they should have a wire coming out of them that one connects to a grounding post somewhere (the screw on an electrical outlet is adequate if there is conduit in the walls instead of just insulated wires). I'd suggest attaching these near common areas where one pets one's pets ;) , and get in the habit of discharging oneself into it when one sees the pet approaching.

If possible, you may want to also have a large enough one on the floor that the pet would step on it on its way to you, because you may not be the source of the static: if you have carpet, your friend walking around is rubbing fur on plastic, which is pretty much guaranteed to cause static. Since cats naturally stand in squares on the ground, if one has a static discharge pad that is maybe 10x10", utilizing it shouldn't be an issue for feline family members (once they are used to it being present), and I suspect many dogs will ignore such things on their way for a good head-skritching. :)

I hope this helps prevent a few disrupted relationships this Winter (and beyond) ['next Winter' for those Forum members below the equator :) ].

[Also shared in Completely Random Thoughts thread.]
To dispel some of the misconceptions about head injuries you have developed from watching movies and TV, I wrote this: ...Some Information on Head Injury Effects


Offline CJones

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Re: Pets
« Reply #992 on: January 13, 2018, 03:15:58 PM »
I took one of my black cats to the vet recently, and the vet's assistant said "Aww, I want a black cat." I told her, come to my neighborhood. There are plenty that need a home.

The people across the street have been leaving food out for stray cats for a couple years now. I know they mean well, but the population of black and black & white cats has gotten out of control. They've clearly been interbreeding. I took in three of them about a year ago, when they were kittens, and had them neutered. However, my cats are starting to get pissed off at the number of other cats hanging around my front yard.

What's sad is that these other cats are very friendly. They would make great pets, but I simply can't afford to take care of them all.


Offline Lesbunny

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Re: Pets
« Reply #993 on: February 20, 2018, 04:56:53 PM »
Taken the steps necessary to bring a pair of rats into my life. I think that at this point in my life, rats are a good pet for me to have, since their lifespan is about 2-3 years, and I'm planning on moving to England in that time frame. I'm super excited, but I'm worried about making sure I don't mistreat them. Part of me is saying that being worried about mistreating them is a good thing, though, because as long as I am worried about them being happy, they probably will have stuff they need to BE happy. Hopefully I'll get my pair of girls on Monday, or maybe Tuesday, it depends on when the rescue and I can get together to do the deal. I was actually blown away by the fact that rodent rescues were a thing, too, but I suppose it makes sense; every animal can be mistreated and in need of rescue.


Offline Lesbunny

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Re: Pets
« Reply #994 on: February 27, 2018, 07:01:18 PM »
I'm getting my rats Saturday, and right now I need to come up with a playpen for them to hang out outside of the cage. I'm looking at getting a bunch of those trifold posterboard things at Walmart for like a buck a piece and kinda making a fold away pen so I can climb in and play with them and such. I thought about using the boxes that most of the amazon stuff came in, but they're too inconsistently sized. Once I come up with a pen, I need to find toys I can put in there. Seems like another trip to the dollar store is in order :D


Offline wihogfan

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Re: Pets
« Reply #995 on: February 27, 2018, 08:11:44 PM »
There's such a thing as a rat rescue?

My old lab mix that I really thought was on his last legs about 6 months ago (blind for the last 2 years, around 13 or 14 years old-not sure as he was a stray before spending 6 months at 2 different Humane Societies before we got him) is still with us, but we're likely really in our last days/weeks with him now. I took him to the park a week ago (quick trip-maybe 15 minutes) and he couldn't walk for about 12 hours afterwards and I was up most of the night with him last night as he was vomiting and vomiting. Better day today as he kept boiled chicken and rice down and took him for a very, very short walk (to the end of the street and back). He's sleeping 18 hours a day, but mostly happy (although weak) when awake. Still kind of hoping he goes to sleep and just doesn't wake up sometime soon, but know we won't get that lucky and am more at peace knowing that I'm likely going to have to euthanize him than I was with I first 3 we had due to knowing we provided him the best life we could for the last 6 years (and the other 3 were unfortunately all younger than him).
 


Offline Lesbunny

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Re: Pets
« Reply #996 on: February 27, 2018, 08:33:25 PM »
There's such a thing as a rat rescue?

My old lab mix that I really thought was on his last legs about 6 months ago (blind for the last 2 years, around 13 or 14 years old-not sure as he was a stray before spending 6 months at 2 different Humane Societies before we got him) is still with us, but we're likely really in our last days/weeks with him now. I took him to the park a week ago (quick trip-maybe 15 minutes) and he couldn't walk for about 12 hours afterwards and I was up most of the night with him last night as he was vomiting and vomiting. Better day today as he kept boiled chicken and rice down and took him for a very, very short walk (to the end of the street and back). He's sleeping 18 hours a day, but mostly happy (although weak) when awake. Still kind of hoping he goes to sleep and just doesn't wake up sometime soon, but know we won't get that lucky and am more at peace knowing that I'm likely going to have to euthanize him than I was with I first 3 we had due to knowing we provided him the best life we could for the last 6 years (and the other 3 were unfortunately all younger than him).

You can pick any type of pet animal and there's basically rescues for them.

I'm really sorry to hear about your dog, though. I can't imagine the pain I'll go through in several hundred years when Ein passes. One thing I've heard multiple times, though, is that if you do have to euthanise them, stay with them, because they look for you after you leave, which is just heartbreaking.


Offline wihogfan

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Re: Pets
« Reply #997 on: February 27, 2018, 08:48:25 PM »
We have a house calls vet (comes to our home) who will euthanize him here if/when the time comes. It was devastating when we had to put our first 3 dogs down, and will be very emotional this time as well, but not being with them at the end was not something I ever considered and while I'm not sure being with them made it any easier for me, I wouldn't have felt right doing it any other way.


Offline LucasM

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Re: Pets
« Reply #998 on: February 28, 2018, 03:07:33 AM »
I'm very sorry, wihogfan.  Having just had to have Lucas euthanised a year ago this month, I feel for you.  I, too, am very glad that my vet was willing to make a house call for Lucas.

It may be incredibly difficult, but if you can, try to ask yourself, as emotionally painful as it is, with your dog in such bad shape, is it fair to your dog to wait and hope he dies in his sleep?  When I saw Lucas struggling a fair amount of the time, regardless of whether he was happy for brief bursts with me each day, for me, I ultimately decided that forcing him to stay around because of the pain of the loss was unfair to him.  It sounds like you gave him a wonderful life.  As yourself if you can let him have a comfortable death, where he isn't struggling to function most all the time, or in pain that he isn't telling you about.  I regret being unable to see that Lucas was struggling much of the time before that near-final vet visit when they told me his thyroid was no longer treatable.  Because of the difficulties he was having, within a week I had to let him go.

I do hope that you can make the most of your remaining time together.  Take care of yourself.
To dispel some of the misconceptions about head injuries you have developed from watching movies and TV, I wrote this: ...Some Information on Head Injury Effects


Offline Russoguru

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Re: Pets
« Reply #999 on: February 28, 2018, 07:04:35 PM »
I have a really good friend who has to take her dog in for Chemo on a regular basis. Now, this is just me, but from all my experiences with pets having surgery, I honestly feel its wisest if your pet has a cancerous malignant tumor to just put them down. I know that may be met with not the most positive feelings but honestly, do you really want to put your pet through multiple rounds of chemotherapy? It's obviously not so much a matter of money but it's also pure misery on the part of your pet IMHO. Sigh, such is the burden of owning and taking care of pets always entails a risk of something.


Offline Lesbunny

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Re: Pets
« Reply #1000 on: February 28, 2018, 08:58:43 PM »
I have a really good friend who has to take her dog in for Chemo on a regular basis. Now, this is just me, but from all my experiences with pets having surgery, I honestly feel its wisest if your pet has a cancerous malignant tumor to just put them down. I know that may be met with not the most positive feelings but honestly, do you really want to put your pet through multiple rounds of chemotherapy? It's obviously not so much a matter of money but it's also pure misery on the part of your pet IMHO. Sigh, such is the burden of owning and taking care of pets always entails a risk of something.

If your child had a cancerous malignant tumor, would you suggest euthanasia as well? Chemo is miserable for anyone, and pets are basically furry children. At least in my opinion. I wouldn't want to write off the possibility of saving my pet unless I get told it's a waste of time by a physician.


Offline Russoguru

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Re: Pets
« Reply #1001 on: March 01, 2018, 07:17:15 PM »
See for me there's a WORLD of difference between a pet and your own child. Yes, I understand there's an unbreakable emotional bond and yes I understand they are family. However, there are certain barriers that hamper the whole level of being able to cooperate with medical treatment, the biggest one being communication. I can tell a child "Don't worry, you're going to be okay, I know this sucks but it's the best and only thing we can do". See I can't communicate with a dog, cat, gerbil, opossum, dolphin or what have you. If an animal has no concept of what's going on to them, then that's a big problem for me. An incision can be made to remove a cyst, a tumor or whatever, but at least you can tell a child "Don't mess with the stitches/staples". I can't tell an animal to not pull all the staples out of their stomach after they've gotten major surgery the previous day! I certainly also can't be expected to be monitoring them 24/7 to make sure they aren't undoing all the surgical work that's just been done!

Don't get me wrong LB I am sympathetic to your position but I have had experiences that strongly influence my opinion.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2018, 07:23:05 PM by Russoguru »


Offline LucasM

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Re: Pets
« Reply #1002 on: March 01, 2018, 08:36:13 PM »
There is another practical difference: life expectancy.  To subject an animal to a lengthy amount of treatment for a very short period of additional life of questionable quality is - to me - cruel.  With, for instance, a 'dog year' being about seven human years (more if larger dog, less if smaller), the animal's perception of the LENGTH of treatment would also be altered (relative to it's life length).  So it becomes a quality of life issue, when such a short period of additional life is possible even with treatment.  For a child with a potential for a far longer life than what they have already experienced left to them following treatment, it is different.  [I don't wish to go into the ethical issues involved in a child who would not survive either way, though I will say that I believe that should be, to a large degree, the child's decision (depending on the child's age and ability to comprehend what is or would be happening to it).]
« Last Edit: March 01, 2018, 11:59:22 PM by LucasM »
To dispel some of the misconceptions about head injuries you have developed from watching movies and TV, I wrote this: ...Some Information on Head Injury Effects


Offline Lesbunny

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Re: Pets
« Reply #1003 on: March 02, 2018, 08:55:10 PM »
Maybe a child isn't a good example in this case. It entirely depends on the age of the dog in question. If it's a puppy, then a child works perfectly, but, if we're talking a 10 year old golden, then I suppose grandpa is a better analogy. If we have an elderly person, someone who isn't capable of making the decisions for themselves(so that the scenarios are relatively similar), who is suffering from cancer, and we have the means to save them, wouldn't we be morally obligated to do so, provided, of course, that there was no undue harm placed on others that they did not accept? The only difference here is that grandpa is a human, and the dog is not. To treat either of them would be to lengthen their lives to a relatively minor degree. Allowing the death of another is wrong, and so the question isn't whether or not it's humane to treat either patient, but rather whether or not a human life is more valuable than a non human life.


Offline LucasM

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Re: Pets
« Reply #1004 on: March 02, 2018, 09:29:16 PM »
Not really.  I have a 91 year old father.  He was diagnosed with cancer last fall.  If he hadn't automatically done as the doctors told him (something common to people of that generation) I would have had a discussion with him about the relatively small amount of additional time he is likely to gain, and the massive loss of quality of living from the treatment itself, asking him to think if he wanted extra life at the expense of suffering from the treatment itself during it.

I did not have to do much end-of-life counseling while working, but I did some.  There is a level of 'just existing for the sake of existing' that does not make sense (the conclusion of those I worked with before I entered the hospital room, and to me, after seeing and working with them).

And I'll state it clearly here: I have prepared a living will (or the closest approximation of one that one can have in this state) that says that if I am injured and expected to function less than I do now, I wish NO medical treatment that would keep me alive.  The same for anything life-threatening that comes up.  There is significant merit to evaluating Quality of Life when discussing end-of-life issues with anyone.

So no, not an issue of 'animal v. human'.  At least not to me.
To dispel some of the misconceptions about head injuries you have developed from watching movies and TV, I wrote this: ...Some Information on Head Injury Effects