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Author Topic: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!  (Read 2131 times)

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Offline Pak-Man

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Re: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!
« Reply #60 on: October 10, 2020, 01:35:50 AM »
I would just like to interject and note that Deadpool retconned himself into Infinity Gauntlet and- of COURSE- made the Thanos-Copter canon-ish.

« Last Edit: October 10, 2020, 02:53:42 AM by Pak-Man »


Offline Russoguru

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Re: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!
« Reply #61 on: October 11, 2020, 01:21:00 AM »
Morgan Freeman portrayed 'Easy Reader' from The Electric Company TV show. This comic, Spidey Super Stories, was done in conjunction with the show. There were skits in the show with Spider Man as well as the comic, and vice versa. Meaning Morgan Freeman was in the comic as the Easy Reader character alongside Spider Man . Here's the first live action skit to introduce Spider Man to The Electric Company universe.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZmqWhF1dtE
Fascinating.


Offline CJones

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Re: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!
« Reply #62 on: October 11, 2020, 07:05:20 PM »
#37d Imperial Radch Trilogy, by Ann Leckie

1 List, 24 Points
Top Vote #2 Edward J Grug III

“Thoughts are ephemeral, they evaporate in the moment they occur, unless they are given action and material form. Wishes and intentions, the same. Meaningless, unless they impel you to one choice or another, some deed or course of action, however insignificant. Thoughts that lead to action can be dangerous. Thoughts that do not, mean less than nothing.”

“If that’s what you’re willing to do for someone you hate, what would you do for someone you love?”

“Luxury always comes at someone else’s expense. One of the many advantages of civilization is that one doesn’t generally have to see that, if one doesn’t wish. You’re free to enjoy its benefits without troubling your conscience.”

“When they behave properly, you will say there is no problem. When they complain loudly, you will say they cause their own problems with their impropriety. And when they are driven to extremes, you say you will not reward such actions. What will it take for you to listen?”

“Strange, how equally important, just different always seemed to translate into some “equally important” roles being more worthy of respect and reward than others.”

"There is always more after the ending. Always the next morning, and the next. Always changes, losses and gains. Always one step after the other. Until the one true ending that none of us can escape. But even that ending is only a small one, larges as it looms for us. There is still the next morning for everyone else. For the vast majority of the rest of the universe that ending might as well not ever have happened. Every ending is an arbitrary one. Everything ending is from another angle, not really an ending.” 

 “I had learned to be wary whenever a priest suggested that her personal aims were, in fact, God's will.”

On a remote, icy planet, the soldier known as Breq is drawing closer to completing her quest. Once, she was the Justice of Toren - a colossal starship with an artificial intelligence linking thousands of soldiers in the service of the Radch, the empire that conquered the galaxy. Now, an act of treachery has ripped it all away, leaving her with one fragile human body, unanswered questions, and a burning desire for vengeance.

*Book 1*
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

*Book 2*
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

*Book 3*
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

So this is another that I've never heard of. The first book won the Hugo, Nebula, Arthur C Clarke and British Science Fiction Association awards for best (science fiction) novel.  I'll have to check it out at some point.

The rights to a TV adaptation were bought by Fox in 2014. but so far nothing seems to have come of it.
 
Fun Fact: Ann Leckie's first published work was a "Bodice Ripper" short story in the magazine True Confessions. A bodice ripper is the type of romance novel where the woman is the helpless damsel in distress that must be saved by a man (who may or not be responsible for said distress). She was uncredited for the story, and my guess is she's perfectly happy to keep it that way.

Found this interview on YouTube:
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/aIF5c1QZMEE" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/aIF5c1QZMEE</a>

Also found this fan made trailer:
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/aZP222XGMvo" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/aZP222XGMvo</a>   


Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!
« Reply #63 on: October 12, 2020, 04:59:11 PM »
I have a hard time getting into most other sci fi, because I just want them to be the Imperial Radch books.
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Offline goflyblind

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Re: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!
« Reply #64 on: October 12, 2020, 05:39:56 PM »
i just recently finished reading the first book, and really enjoyed it. was recommended to me by a "if you like the culture series, you might like..." list. also on that list was reynolds' revelation space books.
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Offline PsychoGoatee

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Re: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!
« Reply #65 on: October 12, 2020, 10:15:29 PM »
I'd just like to say, books are cool, and this countdown is also cool. "Quite cool" as Gandalf would say. I don't know if he says that in the book or just the movie, but I did read The Hobbit.


Offline CJones

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Re: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!
« Reply #66 on: October 13, 2020, 05:04:25 PM »
#37e Catch-22, by Joself Heller

1 List, 24 Points
Top Vote #2 Pak-Man

“Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't after you.”

“The enemy is anybody who's going to get you killed, no matter which side he is on.”

“It doesn't make a damned bit of difference who wins the war to someone who's dead.”

“There was only one catch and that was Catch-22, which specified that a concern for one's safety in the face of dangers that were real and immediate was the process of a rational mind. Orr was crazy and could be grounded. All he had to do was ask; and as soon as he did, he would no longer be crazy and would have to fly more missions. Orr would be crazy to fly more missions and sane if he didn't, but if he was sane he had to fly them. If he flew them he was crazy and didn't have to; but if he didn't want to he was sane and had to. Yossarian was moved very deeply by the absolute simplicity of this clause of Catch-22 and let out a respectful whistle.
"That's some catch, that Catch-22," he observed.
"It's the best there is," Doc Daneeka agreed.”

The novel is set during World War II, from 1942 to 1944. It mainly follows the life of Captain John Yossarian, a U.S. Army Air Forces B-25 bombardier. Most of the events in the book occur while the fictional 256th Squadron is based on the island of Pianosa, in the Mediterranean Sea, west of Italy. The novel looks into the experiences of Yossarian and the other airmen in the camp, who attempt to maintain their sanity while fulfilling their service requirements so that they may return home.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

A "Catch 22", for the purposes of this book, which coined the term, is a situation where, of two options, one is undesirable, but the other is self defeating and therefore also undesirable. In the book, you had to be insane to be let out of combat, but knowing that that is a way out demonstrates that you're not insane. Asking to be excused from combat precluded the possibility of being excused. Although Catch-22 isn't a real thing in the military, the circumstances that would result in such a position do exist (or at least did during WW2).

There is a sequel to Catch-22 called Closing Time. Considering I've never even heard of it, I guessing it wasn't nearly as successful.

Fun Fact: You may be wondering "why 22". The working title was Catch-18, because the number 18 is significant in Judaism, and early drafts leaned more towards Jewish themes.  However, his agent convinced him to change it so as not to be confused with another WW2 novel, "Mila 18". The title Catch-11 was suggested, with the duplicated 1 paralleling the repetition found in a number of character exchanges in the novel, but because of the release of the 1960 movie Ocean's Eleven, this was also rejected. Catch-17 was rejected so as not to be confused with the World War II film "Stalag 17", as was Catch-14, apparently because the publisher did not believe that 14 was a "funny number". Eventually, the title came to be Catch-22, which, like 11, has a duplicated digit, with the 2 also referring to a number of déjà vu-like events common in the novel.


Offline CJones

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Re: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!
« Reply #67 on: October 16, 2020, 02:56:36 PM »
#37f  The Hound of the Baskervilles, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

1 List, 24 Points
Top Vote #2 Stethacantus

“Evil indeed is the man who has not one woman to mourn him.”

“He burst into one of his rare fits of laughter as he turned away from the picture. I have not heard him laugh often, and it has always boded ill to somebody.” 

“There is nothing more stimulating than a case where everything goes against you.”

“The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.”

We owe The Hound of the Baskervilles (1902) to Arthur Conan Doyle's good friend Fletcher "Bobbles" Robinson, who took him to visit some scary English moors and prehistoric ruins, and told him marvelous local legends about escaped prisoners and a 17th-century aristocrat who fell afoul of the family dog. Doyle transmogrified the legend: generations ago, a hound of hell tore out the throat of devilish Hugo Baskerville on the moonlit moor. Poor, accursed Baskerville Hall now has another mysterious death: that of Sir Charles Baskerville. Could the culprit somehow be mixed up with secretive servant Barrymore, history-obsessed Dr. Frankland, butterfly-chasing Stapleton, or Selden, the Notting Hill murderer at large? Someone's been signaling with candles from the mansion's windows. Nor can supernatural forces be ruled out. Can Dr. Watson--left alone by Sherlock Holmes to sleuth in fear for much of the novel--save the next Baskerville, Sir Henry, from the hound's fangs?

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

I've never read any of the Sherlock Holmes stories. I'm just not really a fan of mystery novels in general. Like I said in Sign of the Four, they always feel too contrived. However, Hound of the Baskervilles is considered by most Sherlock fans to be the best, or very nearly best, of the Sherlock Holmes stories.

Fun Fact: This was the first Sherlock Holmes story written after his death in The Final Problem, eight years prior. To get around this problem, Doyle set the events of Hound two years before the events of Final Problem. Doyle had never intended to write any more Sherlock Holmes stories after The Final Problem, but demand for it was so high that he relented. The next story, "The Adventure of the Empty House", resurrected him proper, claiming Holmes had faked his own death.   


Offline CJones

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Re: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!
« Reply #68 on: October 20, 2020, 04:41:30 PM »
#31a The City and the City, by China Miéville

1 List, 25 Points
Top Vote #1 Edward J Grug III

“He walked with equipoise, possibly in either city. Schrödinger’s pedestrian.”

“Is it more childish and foolish to insist that there is a conspiracy or that there is not?”

“…where the two cities are close up they make for interference patterns, harder to read or predict. They are more than a city and a city; that is elementary urban arithmetic.”

“Books are always obviously having conversations with other books, and some times they're amiable and sometimes not.”

When a murdered woman is found in the city of Beszel, somewhere at the edge of Europe, it looks to be a routine case for Inspector Tyador Borlú of the Extreme Crime Squad. But as he investigates, the evidence points to conspiracies far stranger and more deadly than anything he could have imagined.

Borlú must travel from the decaying Beszel to the only metropolis on Earth as strange as his own. This is a border crossing like no other, a journey as psychic as it is physical, a shift in perception, a seeing of the unseen. His destination is Beszel’s equal, rival, and intimate neighbor, the rich and vibrant city of Ul Qoma. With Ul Qoman detective Qussim Dhatt, and struggling with his own transition, Borlú is enmeshed in a sordid underworld of rabid nationalists intent on destroying their neighboring city, and unificationists who dream of dissolving the two into one. As the detectives uncover the dead woman’s secrets, they begin to suspect a truth that could cost them and those they care about more than their lives.

What stands against them are murderous powers in Beszel and in Ul Qoma: and, most terrifying of all, that which lies between these two cities.

Note: I couldn't find a good synopsis of this book. The one on Wikipedia is less than three lines long. The only other one I could find was many many pages long, presumably written by someone who doesn't understand what a synopsis is. Wikipedia does have a fair amount to say about the setting though, from which I gather is more interesting than the actual plot.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

This sounds like a great premise. I'll add it to my list of books I want to read, but probably will never get around to :P

Fun-ish Fact: China Miéville wrote this book as a gift for his terminally ill mother, who was a fan of police procedurals.

There is a four part miniseries based on the book, produced for BBC Two in 2018. I have no idea if it is any good, but it's available on Amazon Prime, with ads, and on BritBox without.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/imve_FOmxIc" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/imve_FOmxIc</a>


Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!
« Reply #69 on: October 20, 2020, 09:01:55 PM »
Sadly the tv series didn't really work. (Which isn't surprising given the premise)

One problem is that they make it about a romance that isn't in the book and just isn't interesting at all.

I've read a few other Miéville books and enjoyed some, but none as much as this. I would love more books in that world.
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Offline CJones

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Re: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!
« Reply #70 on: October 21, 2020, 06:55:06 PM »
#31b The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald

1 List, 25 Points
Top Vote #1 Stethacantus

“In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I've been turning over in my mind ever since.
"Whenever you feel like criticizing any one," he told me, "just remember that all the people in this world haven't had the advantages that you've had.”

“I hope she'll be a fool -- that's the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool.” 

“He smiled understandingly-much more than understandingly. It was one of those rare smiles with a quality of eternal reassurance in it, that you may come across four or five times in life. It faced--or seemed to face--the whole eternal world for an instant, and then concentrated on you with an irresistible prejudice in your favor. It understood you just as far as you wanted to be understood, believed in you as you would like to believe in yourself, and assured you that it had precisely the impression of you that, at your best, you hoped to convey.”

“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”

The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald's third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. This exemplary novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The story is of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his new love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when The New York Times noted "gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession," it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Fitzgerald, inspired by the parties he had attended while visiting Long Island's North Shore, began planning the novel in 1923, desiring to produce, in his words, "something new—something extraordinary and beautiful and simple and intricately patterned." Progress was slow, with Fitzgerald completing his first draft following a move to the French Riviera in 1924. His editor, Maxwell Perkins, felt the book was vague and persuaded the author to revise over the following winter.

First published by Scribner's in April 1925, The Great Gatsby received mixed reviews and sold poorly. In its first year, the book sold only 20,000 copies. Fitzgerald died in 1940, believing himself to be a failure and his work forgotten. However, the novel experienced a revival during World War II, and became a part of American high school curricula and numerous stage and film adaptations in the following decades. Today, The Great Gatsby is widely considered to be a literary classic and a contender for the title of the "Great American Novel."

I actually have read this, but it was so long ago I remember very little of it. The main thing I do remember is Gatsby being characterized as "Nouveau Riche", "new money". When Nick asks him where he got his money, Gatsby says he earned it. Nick replies "I thought you inherited your money." "I did, old sport, but I lost most of it in the big panic - the panic of the war." Gatsby says back. He started out with money, lost most of it, and then made his way back to the top as part of the nouveau riche. He's the only wealthy character in the book that didn't inherit his money.

Fun Fact: There are naked women reflected in the irises of the face on the cover. The cover art was actually finished before the book, and Fitzgerald liked it so much he worked it into the novel.

Another Fun Fact: The copyright on this book runs out this year. As of January 1st 2021, it will be in the public domain.


Offline stethacantus

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Re: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!
« Reply #71 on: October 21, 2020, 09:58:14 PM »
It also made a great video game for Nintendo:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/yqTUKgQ_Cz4" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/yqTUKgQ_Cz4</a>

There is a playable version online:
http://greatgatsbygame.com/


Offline CJones

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Re: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!
« Reply #72 on: October 22, 2020, 05:32:48 PM »
Sorry, no entry tonight. I'm recovering from a minor medical procedure. The next one is a doozy and I'd like to do it justice.


Offline dbsommer

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Re: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!
« Reply #73 on: October 22, 2020, 06:12:39 PM »
So for useless stats now that we've had a #1 choice show up, assuming I counted correctly:

Every one out of the 11 submitters has had at least one of their top 4 choices show up.

6 unique number 4-2 choices are in. That is a weird stat as the odds of that are probably abysmal. Also means there was quite a bit of overlap with those top 4 among the voters.

So far only Stethacantus has had 4 unique top 4 choices, though George 2.0 has a chance of rivaling that if his #1 is unique.

Enders Game is the only lower numbered book (13 was it's highest choice) that has appeared on multiple lists so far.

Night Watch would have had 20 more points if I had remembered the correct title to the story in the series. It was supposed to be my number 6 and not 'Guards,Guards'. Now if 'Guards, Guards does somehow show up it'll get those 20 points instead.


Offline goflyblind

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Re: List o' Crap #127 Top 50 Novels Countdown!
« Reply #74 on: October 22, 2020, 06:25:35 PM »
guards! guards! introduces errol, so it's an okay mistake.
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