2

Author Topic: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films  (Read 4876 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline PsychoGoatee

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1095
  • Liked: 166
  • We are the road crew!
Re: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films
« Reply #105 on: December 20, 2019, 04:23:20 PM »
Learn something new every day. And I've gotta see Five Elements Ninja, that sounds rad. And Police Story sure blew me away.


linszoid

  • Guest
Re: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films
« Reply #106 on: December 20, 2019, 04:31:12 PM »
Wait, so the 5 elements are constantly insulting each other? Is metal all like, "Hey fire, some of us can pee without a burning sensation. No need to get fired up. You must really be hot under the collar. Burn"


Offline stethacantus

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1474
  • Liked: 307
Re: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films
« Reply #107 on: December 20, 2019, 07:36:53 PM »
While the English dub is hilarious -it sounds like the voices come from South Park- I'll say it again, stick to the original language with subs…. It’s much more enjoyable that way)

I don't think Shaw Brothers actually recorded sound, but like most studios across the world, filmed without sound and had their movies dubbed. The Chinese language track is supposedly all dubbed. The only way to hear the true voices of their stars was in the few co-productions with English studios. For example, David Chiang in Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires which was co-produced with Hammer Films. Each actor at Shaw Brothers had his own vocal actor who did his voice for the Chinese release.  It was a combination of the actors working in so many films that they didn't have the time to dub their voices, and some of them unable to speak the dialect  the films were officially being released in.  The English language dubs were done by Australian voice actors who often did more than one character in a film, and would trade off on actors on each film. It wasn't just that the English dubs weren't as well acted as the Chinese dubs, but the dialog needed to be rewritten once translated to English so it would fit the lip movement, and often subtext an occasionally vital plot points were omitted. Removed lines were often replaced with the line "But still...", so often that it became a joke among English language fans of the films.

Perhaps the worst offense was with Heroes of the East. The original film had the Chinese actors speaking Chinese, and most of the Japanese characters only able to speak Japanese. The inability for both cultures to communicate was a major plot point. But in the English dub, all the characters speak English. The original ending has Gordon Liu giving a speech about how both martial arts schools should be united while the leader of the Japanese translates to those who don't speak Chinese. In the English language dub everyone speaks English. The speech is mostly the same, but instead of the leader of the Japanese translating, he is yelling at his students to listen to what Gordon Liu is saying because it is important, while they are trying to listen to what Gordon Liu is saying.


Online George-2.0

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 967
  • Liked: 615
Re: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films
« Reply #108 on: December 20, 2019, 08:39:29 PM »
That's interesting, I knew the Italians did that for decades, didn't know China (or Shaw) was. I mean, I knew they were recording multiple tracks for many of these things - Mandarin, Cantonese.... but I wasn't sure what the original language was, or if it mattered.

In early India cinema, they would sometimes film 2 movies, one in Hindi one Bengali - same story, same director, but with mostly different actors, at times, a few different scenes. As an aside, India has an interesting sound and music history. If anyone is interested, here's a piece on that... http://www.filmsound.org/india/
« Last Edit: December 21, 2019, 12:18:41 AM by George-2.0 »


Online George-2.0

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 967
  • Liked: 615
Re: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films
« Reply #109 on: December 21, 2019, 03:27:12 AM »
#5 – Hero
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/_USDk5jaGek" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/_USDk5jaGek</a>
75 points on 4 of 11 lists - Highest Ranking: #1 (Charles Castle)

Year: 2002
Director: Zhang Yimou

That's one of the more misleading trailers you'll ever find - Hero is actually a highly fictionalized account of the failed assasination attempt on the first Emperor of China - While not ranked by either Paste or GamesRadar, the picture received a 95% rating at Rotten Tomatoes, who wrote... With death-defying action sequences and epic historic sweep, Hero offers everything a martial arts fan could ask for.

Ben Johnson of Kung Fu Movie Guide gave it 5-stars and wrote... "Hero is a monumental picture; like looking at a King Hu movie through a kaleidoscope. Chinese art director Zhang Yimou brings together an ensemble cast of exquisite talent to create a period martial arts tale of epic proportions, whilst meticulous Australian cinematographer Christopher Doyle scours the land for some of the most breathtaking visuals ever captured in an action movie. At times the film is quite overwhelming, and a small screen can never do it justice."

Trivia from Kung Fu Kingdom (who rated the film 9 out of 10)
In “Highlander Endgame” Donnie Yen appears as an immortal whom Duncan McLeod recognises as Jing Ke, the same historical figure on which “Hero” is based


Online George-2.0

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 967
  • Liked: 615
Re: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films
« Reply #110 on: December 21, 2019, 03:29:07 AM »
#4 – Kung Fu Hustle
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/47nS6Wo4yaw" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/47nS6Wo4yaw</a>
89 points on 7 of 11 lists - Highest Ranking: #2 (Cole Stratton & Johnny Unusual)

Year: 2004
Director: Stephen Chow

Paste ranked it #68 and wrote… Stephen Chow is probably the biggest name in martial arts comedy since the days of Sammo Hung, and Kung Fu Hustle will likely remain one of his most well-regarded films both as a director and performer. Gleefully kooky, it combines occasional song and dance with extremely exaggerated kung fu parody in telling the tale of a young man who ends up overthrowing a large criminal organization, the “Deadly Axe Gang.” This is not a complex film—rather, it’s simply intended as popcorn entertainment at its most absurd. The action has no basis in reality, being closer to a real-world depiction of Looney Tune physics. The characters are broad pastiches and references to famous actors from the genre’s history abound. With comedy that teeters decidedly on the juvenile or inscrutable side, it’s a film that some will dismiss off-hand, but Chow’s style has always and will probably always be “entertain first, make sense later.” That’s what he does, and he does it better than anyone else. —Jim Vorel


Online George-2.0

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 967
  • Liked: 615
Re: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films
« Reply #111 on: December 21, 2019, 03:46:34 AM »
#3 – Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/-jTdOdcMKoY" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/-jTdOdcMKoY</a>
91 points on 9 of 11 lists - Highest Ranking: #2 (Charles Castle)

Year: 2000
Director: Ang Lee

Ranked 6th in Pastes Top 100... Ang Lee’s Oscar-winning epic is not only the highest-grossing foreign film ever, but it also happens to be yet another foreign film that changed the cinematic landscape: a kung fu flick with pulpy soul and a romantic heart. Chow Yun-Fat, Michelle Yeoh and Zhang Ziyi play 19th-century warriors whose loyalty and vitality are tested by a series of events that lead each to contemplate their many life decisions that brought them to that point. Beyond the entrancing and lyrical storytelling, Crouching Tiger stands as a rare, beautiful beacon of hope: a foreign film that was actually universally embraced by Western audiences. Here’s to hoping that happens more often. —Jeremy Medina

Trivia: Crouching Tiger was nominated for 10 Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and won Best Foreign Language Film (Taiwan)

Cheng Pei-pei (Come Drink With Me) won Best Supporting Actress at the 20th Hong Kong Film Awards

The film was originally written as a novel series by Wang Dulu starting in the late 1930s, and is loosely adapted from the storyline of the fourth book in the series

My Thoughts: I have a giant crush on Zhang Ziyi... that's all I wanted to add. Thank you.


« Last Edit: December 21, 2019, 04:29:07 AM by George-2.0 »


Online George-2.0

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 967
  • Liked: 615
Re: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films
« Reply #112 on: December 21, 2019, 03:51:31 AM »
So are you moist with anticipation? Is the suspense killing you?

Sure, we all know it's coming down to Miami Connection and Samurai Cop, but still, who will be #1?

Ah, who am I kidding, there is no suspense. I'm the only member on the forum.

I could go to sleep, make y'all wait another 8 hours, but that would be mean,

So here it is.

wait for it...

wait...

wait...


Online George-2.0

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 967
  • Liked: 615
Re: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films
« Reply #113 on: December 21, 2019, 03:57:24 AM »
#2 – The Legend of Drunken Master
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/7P7tWqwKqE4" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/7P7tWqwKqE4</a>
109 points on 8 of 11 lists - Highest Ranking: #1 (linszoid)

Year: 1994
Director: Lau Kar-leung

Paste ranked it 7th and said… 1994’s Drunken Master II (released in the U.S. as The Legend of Drunken Master) is Jackie Chan’s best movie—by far. It features everything uniquely awesome about Chan’s martial-arts movie stardom while showcasing each of his prime elements (fluidity of motion/technique, comedic timing, sheer athleticism) better than in any one of his other cinematic punch-outs, including the original 1978 Drunken Master (starring an obviously much younger Chan). Here he leads as Wong Fei Hung, a Chinese folk hero who employs his Zui Quan (Drunken Boxing) skills to stop the corrupt British consul set on illegally exporting Chinese artifacts out of the country. Although nearly all the action sequences are wonderfully exhaustive and memorable, the final fight is a breathless show-stopper. —K. Alexander Smith

My Thoughts: When Bruce Lee died there were a lot of pretenders to the throne, a lot of studios trying desperately to find the new Bruce. It failed because Lee was one of a kind. Jackie went the other way, he used comedy, developed his own style... whereas Bruce would face a crowd of toughs and give a look that said, "Is that all you got?" and then plow right in a destroy them all. Jackie's characters would often get this look of concern and then run away from the gang of toughs. He'd use the environment around him, against them - flip back, circle round, climb, fall, all while trying to avoid obstructions (like a bus or a tractor) which he would also employ in his kung fu dance.

I think it's appropriate that our top films feature two distinct, charismatic superstars of the genre - the kings. Which takes us to...
« Last Edit: December 21, 2019, 04:08:26 AM by George-2.0 »


Online George-2.0

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 967
  • Liked: 615
Re: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films
« Reply #114 on: December 21, 2019, 04:05:41 AM »
#1 – Enter The Dragon
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/81jCPIag4KA" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/81jCPIag4KA</a>
122 points on 8 of 11 lists - Highest Ranking: #1 (George-2.0)

Year: 1973
Director: Robert Clouse

GamesRadar ranked it 7th - Paste ranked it 3rd and wrote… What remains to be said about Enter the Dragon? Bruce Lee’s most essential film draws upon the classic tournament structure to give a variety of interesting fights (even for a confused-looking John Saxon), but it also shines in any of the other moments where it’s following Lee as he snoops around Han’s fortress, uncovering his drug manufacturing schemes. Jim Kelly is also valuable as a second talented performer, in the role that would make him a blaxploitation icon. There’s no shortage of iconic moments and fights, such as the final duel with a claw-handed Han, but perhaps the best is when Lee fights his way through a few dozen henchmen in the bowels of the fortress, including a young Jackie Chan, who gets his neck snapped. You’ve also got to feel for that poor mook who sees Bruce Lee wielding nunchucks and says to himself, “No problem, I can take him.” —Jim Vorel

Casting:
John Saxon is a black belt in Judo and Shotokan Karate, who studied under grandmaster Hidetaka Nishiyama for three years. In negotiations, his agent told the film's producers that if they wanted him they would have to change the story so that the character of Williams would be killed, not Roper. They agreed and the script was changed.

Rockne Tarkington was originally cast in the role of Williams. However, he unexpectedly dropped out days before the production was about to begin in Hong Kong. Producer Fred Weintraub knew that karate world champion, Jim Kelly had a training dojo in Crenshaw, Los Angeles so he hastily arranged a meeting. Weintraub was immediately impressed, and Kelly was cast in the film. The success of Kelly's appearance launched his career as a star: after Enter the Dragon, he signed a three-film deal with Warner Bros and went on to make several martial arts-themed blaxploitation films in the 1970s.
 
Jackie Chan appears as a guard during the underground lair battle scene and gets his neck snapped by Lee. He also performed several stunts for the film, including the scene where Lee's character quickly climbs a rooftop at night. However, Yuen Wah was Lee's main stunt double for the film.
 
Sammo Hung appears in a brief fight scene against Lee at the start of the film.

My Review: https://letterboxd.com/captainquint/film/enter-the-dragon/

Greatest Movie Poster ever? A lot of the HK flicks featured incredible poster art, but this definitely ranks among my favorites

« Last Edit: December 21, 2019, 04:07:32 AM by George-2.0 »


Online George-2.0

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 967
  • Liked: 615
Re: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films
« Reply #115 on: December 21, 2019, 04:23:52 AM »
And there it is, I wanted to get it done before Christmas - mission accomplished. I want to thank everyone who contributed lists (10 full, 1 partial). I'm grateful to all who helped make this a pretty darn good LoC. While I was familiar with the movies we got in the States in the 70s, I was no expert going in, but I watched a lot of movies over the last couple of weeks, did a lot of reading and learning, and that added to my enjoyment as host.

Final thoughts on what didn't make the 50? I thought Ong Bak was a lock (it was on 3 lists, but missed the 50 by 2 pts). I thought the Matrix would show up on more lists. I was surprised that Van Damme and Chuck Norris were no shows (aside from his gig in a Bruce Lee movie). And despite Under Siege being a solid flick, I'm not surprised that Seagal wasn't present, as a lot of people dislike him.

I now throw the meteor hammer over to Linszoid for the next LoC. Take it away sensei.

The Top 15


linszoid

  • Guest
Re: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films
« Reply #116 on: December 21, 2019, 08:43:51 AM »
Nice job on the list, even though we as a group seemed to forget about Death Promise.

I'll try to get mine started today or tomorrow.


Offline F-Zero

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 536
  • Liked: 185
Re: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films
« Reply #117 on: December 21, 2019, 09:03:41 AM »
I picked up some leads on great kung fu movies i havent seen.  Awesome job, thx for hosting


Offline Russoguru

  • Climbed El Capitan
  • *******
  • Posts: 5098
  • Liked: 1197
  • Everyday ends with a tums festival!
Re: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films
« Reply #118 on: December 21, 2019, 09:18:52 AM »
So Enter the Dragon won? Wow, I'm shocked.  ;)
"In all my years of conquest, violence, and slaughter, it was never personal. But I'll tell you now, what I'm about to do to your stubborn, annoying little planet... I'm going to enjoy it... very very much."
-Thanos


Offline PsychoGoatee

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1095
  • Liked: 166
  • We are the road crew!
Re: List of Crap #121: Top 50 Martial Arts/Wuxia Films
« Reply #119 on: December 21, 2019, 10:26:35 AM »
Lot of fun, excellent countdown! And you're right I forgot about Van Damme and Tony Jaa. Bloodsport is a classic for sure. And this list gave me some more cool movies for my watch list, as always, which is cool.