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Author Topic: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films  (Read 6262 times)

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Offline George-2.0

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Re: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films
« Reply #45 on: October 08, 2018, 09:17:29 AM »
I was the other person with Lonesome Dove. I saw that when it originally aired. And by saw that I mean my Mom saw it and I also happened to be there. I was 13, and to be honest, I barely remember the plot. However, it still sticks in my mind as one of the best mini-series I've ever seen. I should watch it again.

It's well worth another viewing. And a 13-years-olds fond memories are alright to go on. It deserves a spot on the list for sure.

Fond memories is what put the original True Grit so high on my list. I liked the movie a lot, but the family bonding thing gives it that extra bump. I loved John Wayne movies as a kid, and while my family didn't watch a lot of award shows, I think everyone knew John Wayne was going to win the Academy Award, and I remember mom and pops letting me stay up to watch, part, or all of the Oscars just to see him win and to hear his speech.



Offline George-2.0

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Re: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films
« Reply #46 on: October 08, 2018, 11:46:29 PM »
#33 – MY DARLING CLEMENTINE
”I've heard a lot about you, too, Doc. You left your mark around in Deadwood, Denver and places. In fact, a man could almost follow your trail goin' from graveyard to graveyard.” - Wyatt Earp


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40 points on 2 of 13 lists - Highest Ranking: #2 (Edward J. Grugg III)

Director: John Ford

Stars: Henry Fonda, Victor Mature, Linda Darnell, Ward Bond, Walter Brennan, Tim Holt

Subgenre: Traditional Western

John Ford’s lyrical and, at times, free-handed interpretation of the shootout between the Earps and the Clantons at the O.K. Corral stands as one the greatest of the old-school Hollywood Westerns to expertly explore themes of revenge, loss and the ever encroaching hand of civilization on the Western frontier. Thanks to the ongoing efforts of Old West historians, we now know that Ford’s romanticized account doesn’t bear much relation to historical truth, but it is mighty potent in poetic truth. The stately pace of life in Tombstone reflects the state of mind of the Earps, men hardened by action and dangerous situations returning to and trying to fit into a fairly calm haven. It also served as a timely allegory for soldiers returning to civilian life post World War II. The arrival of Clementine Carter (Cathy Downs) in Tombstone signifies opposing yet equally bleak meanings for Doc Holliday (Victor Mature) and Wyatt Earp (Henry Fonda). For Doc, she is a reminder of the innocence and respectability he has long left behind in his years of dissolute living. For Earp, she is a vision of the future he could have—a home, a wife, a comfortable life—but can’t bring himself to claim. The dedication of the new church with a square dance social, closely followed by the eruption of violence caused by the Earp-Clanton feud, brings the point home. Although evil has been driven out of Tombstone for now, Wyatt’s soul is still untamed. There is no way he can embrace the life of a solid, upstanding citizen. The final scene between him and Clementine leaves the door open should he heal his internal wounds and choose to return to her. - Joe Petitt Jr., Paste

Trivia:
The movie was featured in the TV series M*A*S*H episode M*A*S*H: Movie Tonight (1977). It was said to have been the favorite movie of Col. Sherman Potter.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2018, 11:54:38 PM by George-2.0 »


Offline George-2.0

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Re: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films
« Reply #47 on: October 08, 2018, 11:49:12 PM »
#32 – ULZANA’S RAID
”He don't mean to fight you no place, Lieutenant. He only wants to kill you.” - MacIntosh


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44 points on 3 of 13 lists - Highest Ranking: #9 (George 2.0)

Director: Robert Aldrich

Stars: Burt Lancaster, Bruce Davison, Jorge Luke, Richard Jaeckel, Joaquín Martínez, Karl Swenson, John Pearce

Subgenre: Cavalry Western (revisionist or traditional. Sources disagree)

Released in the thick of the revisionist Western cycle of the late 1960s and early 1970s, Robert Aldrich’s powerful and savage movie is unjustly misunderstood as a reactionary response to films like Little Big Man, Soldier Blue and others. The Apaches, led by the tenacious Ulzana (Joaquin Martinez), are ruthless warriors, though also intelligent and methodical in their war strategizing. Aldrich and screenwriter Alan Sharp envisioned the movie as an allegory of the Vietnam War, raising some knotty moral quandaries for their lead characters—a naive cavalry lieutenant (Bruce Davison) determined to end the Apache guerrilla war through understanding, and a seasoned, battle-weary scout (Burt Lancaster) who knows the situation is long past that stage. Weighing the ethics of war while being attacked will only get you killed. Trying to do the right, compassionate thing will only cause more havoc and put your troops at greater risk of death. It’s a gritty, unromantic affair and the violence is appropriately ugly and jarring. - Derek Hill, Paste

Trivia:
The movie was from an original screenplay by Alan Sharp and was, in turn, based on a true story. Ulzana was an Apache in the time of Geronimo who went on a deadly raid in Arizona in late 1885.

There are two cuts of the film because Burt Lancaster helped to produce the movie. One version was edited under the supervision of Aldrich, the other by Lancaster. There are many subtle differences between the two although the overall running times are similar and most of the changes involve alterations of shots or lines of dialogue within scenes.

Gene Siskel and Vincent Canby of the New York Times named it one of the 10 best films of 1972
« Last Edit: October 09, 2018, 12:48:11 AM by George-2.0 »


Offline George-2.0

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Re: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films
« Reply #48 on: October 08, 2018, 11:51:21 PM »
#31 – THE HATEFUL EIGHT
”When you get to hell, John, tell them Daisy sent you..” - Daisy Domergue


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44 points on 3 of 13 lists - Highest Ranking: #4 (PsychoGoatee)

Director: Quentin Tarantino

Stars: Kurt Russell, Channing Tatum, Tim Roth, Michael Madsen, Samuel L. Jackson, Bruce Dern, Demián Bichir, Walton Goggins, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Zoë Bell, James Parks

Subgenre: Spaghetti-style mystery Western

“Looks can be deceiving,” says Michael Madsen to Kurt Russell upon first introduction in The Hateful Eight. No four words could be more appropriate to the moment, or to the movie, a sprawling film with an intimate core. More so than most marquee movies and tent poles claiming to be “epic,” it actually lives up to the word. There’s a pomp and grandiosity to the weight of the film—the cast is stupendous, the dialogue dazzles, disgusts and delights in equal measure, and the craftsmanship is peerless. Quentin Tarantino is chiefly interested in the exchanging of barbs and threats more than he is in action. Make no mistake, The Hateful Eight is insanely violent, but it’s fixated around violent talk and violent reverie before physical violence. Frontier justice does quench our thirst, but the themes of social justice that drive the film are more satiating by far. It all adds up to a towering work, as profound as it is profane. - Andy Crump, Paste

Trivia:
The guitar that Daisy Domergue (Jennifer Jason Leigh) played while singing "Jim Jones at Botany Bay" was a priceless antique from the 1870s, on loan from the Martin Guitar Museum. At the end of the song, the script called for John "The Hangman" Ruth (Kurt Russell) to grab the guitar and smash it to pieces. Six replicas were built for the shoot, and were supposed to be substituted for the real instrument for the smashing shot, but due to a miscommunication, Kurt Russell was not informed, and destroyed the original guitar before anyone could stop him. Jennifer Jason Leigh's shocked reaction to this is genuine, and can be seen in the released film. The Martin Guitar Museum subsequently announced they would never loan guitars to film shoots again.

As a guitarist myself, reading that story made me sick to my stomach.


Offline George-2.0

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Re: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films
« Reply #49 on: October 08, 2018, 11:54:08 PM »
#30 –THE GREAT SILENCE
”Once, my husband told me of this man. He avenges our wrongs. And the bounty killers sure do tremble when he appears. They call him "Silence." Because wherever he goes, the silence of death follows” - Pauline


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45 points on 4 of 13 lists - Highest Ranking: #11 (Charles Castle)

Director: Sergio Corbucci

Stars: Jean-Louis Trintignant, Klaus Kinksi, Vonetta McGee, Frank Wolff, Luigi Pistilli

Subgenre: Anti-Western/Revisionist Western

Growing in stature as the years pass, the bleak majesty of Sergio Corbucci’s dark, complex meditation on the human cost of progress threatens to outstrip the bleached, hallucinatory, hyper-violent ‘Django’ as his crowning achievement.

Set in Utah during the Great Blizzard of 1899, it follows the mute Silence (Jean-Louis Trintignant), a hired gun with a particular interest in the state-sanctioned bounty hunters – exemplified by Klaus Kinski’s mannered, controlled, entirely deadly Loco – who are clearing the land of anyone who doesn’t have their finger in the pie.

Though overflowing with theological subtext and social indignance, it’s an uncommonly reserved film by spaghetti western (and Kinski) standards, but when that silence is broken, the noise and fury are truly something to behold. - Adam Lee Davies, Time Out

Trivia:
According to Sergio Corbucci, Marcello Mastroianni gave him the idea of a mute gunfighter when the actor told him that he had always wanted to do a Western, but unfortunately didn't speak English. When Corbucci first met Jean-Louis Trintignant, he learned that he didn't speak English either. Because he had a fascination with characters with a crippling weakness, Corbucci decided that this was the moment to turn the taciturn Spaghetti Western hero into a mute.

My Reflections:
Appropriate that this is grouped with the Hateful Eight, since that film references, or rather lifts scenes from this one. As the Time Out reviewer states, Silence has grown in stature, likely due to the restoration and disc release which allowed audiences to finally see the film as it was intend


Offline George-2.0

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Re: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films
« Reply #50 on: October 09, 2018, 02:45:50 AM »
So we got our first from Ford. Our second from Aldrich. I have Ulzana on one of those 10 Packs...



It cost me $10, and the print was good. Most of the movies were crap... I did like The Eagle and the Hawk. And Jet Pilot as a kind of guilty pleasure. Ulanza's Raid was the jewel of the set.

And it's nice to see a Spaghetti Western (Silence) make the list, from someone other than 'you-know-who'


So anyone getting ideas for their watchlists? Anything on the list so far that you want to see?

I did check out Maverick. It was cute, a little overlong, but cute. it had a good cast. Jodie Foster was my fave. She's built her rep as a dramatic actress over the years, so it was nice to see her in something like this - being playful and silly. Though I disliked the ending
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

It wouldn't make my personal top 50, but it was a good nights entertainment. Glad I watched it.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2018, 02:51:19 AM by George-2.0 »


Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films
« Reply #51 on: October 09, 2018, 04:15:46 PM »
MY DARLING CLEMENTINE is always battling with my number 1 for the top position as favourite Western.

ULZANA’S RAID and THE GREAT SILENCE I haven't seen.

THE HATEFUL EIGHT - I have a love/hate relationship with Tarantino in general, and this movie is the same. I loved a lot of it, and could have done without the oral rape scene. It did not make my list.
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Re: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films
« Reply #52 on: October 09, 2018, 10:41:35 PM »
My Darling Clementine is great. Random detail, I liked how Hateful Eight had an intermission when I saw it in the theater, during the limited release on film part. I don't think I'd had one since I saw Seven Samurai in a theater way back.


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Re: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films
« Reply #53 on: October 09, 2018, 10:53:27 PM »
I do enjoy a movie with an intermission.
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Offline George-2.0

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Re: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films
« Reply #54 on: October 09, 2018, 11:21:27 PM »
I remember when they restored Kubrick's Spartacus (added a found scene, cleaned it up). I drove to the big city to see it at this gorgeous, old style, single screen theater. With plush carpets, a balcony and all. Huge screen too. I think this was showing during a city wide film festival. And that movie had an intermission... where you go out into the lobby and have drinks (and I mean real drinks, like champagne served in glasses). Just a great, classy experience. I've never loved Spartacus more than I did that day.


Offline George-2.0

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Re: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films
« Reply #55 on: October 09, 2018, 11:24:58 PM »
Well lets get back to it. Looks like a day full of Cole and Stethan...

#29 – SILVERADO
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46 points on 2 of 13 lists - Highest Ranking: #2 (Cole Stratton)

Director: Lawrence Kasadan

Stars: Kevin Costner, Brian Dennehy, Scott Glenn, Danny Glover, Kevin Kline, Rosanna Arquette, John Cleese, Jeff Goldblum, Linda Hunt, Jeff Fahey, Amanda Wyss, Earl Hindman

Subgenre: Traditional Western

Lawrence Kasdan’s winning homage benefited from a sterling ensemble cast (Scott Glenn, Kevin Costner, Kevin Cline, Danny Glover, Brian Dennehy, John Cleese, Jeff Goldblum, Rosanna Arquette), keen pacing—both in action and humor—and an all-in approach to the classic Western. The traditional motifs are all there as a quartet of cowboys treks to the film’s namesake town and helps its citizens fight back against corrupt powers that be. From fraught duels to wagon trains and cattle stampedes, Silverado is neither revisionist nor original, but it’s terrifically energetic and fun, not to mention beautifully polished in production. —Amanda Schurr, Paste

Trivia:
John Cleese's first line, "What's all this then?", is a Monty Python in-joke, as that line was often uttered by policemen upon entering the scene of a crime on Monty Python's Flying Circus (1969).


Offline George-2.0

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Re: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films
« Reply #56 on: October 09, 2018, 11:26:01 PM »
#28 – DEAD MAN
"That weapon will replace your tongue. You will learn to speak through it. And your poetry will now be written with blood.” - Nobody


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47 points on 4 of 13 lists - Highest Ranking: #3 (Stethancantus)

Director: Jim Jarmusch

Stars: Johnny Depp, Gary Farmer, Crispin Glover, Robert Mitchum, John Hurt, Gabriel Byrne, Lance Henriksen, Iggy Pop, Billy Bob Thornton, Alfred Molina

Subgenre: Acid Western

Easily the bleakest film on a very bleak list, Jim Jarmusch’s intoxicating and dismally poetic exploration of physical and spiritual death sees Johnny Depp as the coincidently named traveller, William Blake. He’s a meek and mild bookkeeper whose journey into the abyss commences with a strangely confrontational tête-à-tête with a train fireman played by a blackface Crispin Glover.
It then proceeds to more unsettling as the minutes tick by. He arrives at the hellish industry settlement of Machine, only to be forced straight from it as a wanted man when he catches a bullet in his chest and steals the prize stallion from factory owner Robert Mitchum… and murders his son.

Though it quotes liberally (and jokingly) from the book of western lore, the structure of Jarmusch’s film is more like an epic poem – the tall tales of Chaucer infused with the macabre gothic of Poe – while its style comes over as a malevolent homage to Tarkovsky’s bucolic quest for spiritual enlightenment, ‘Andrei Rublev’, or to Bosch’s ‘The Garden of Earthly Delights’.

Blake is helped along his deathly trail (which takes in a who’s-who cast of American supporting character actors) by a Native American outcast called Nobody (Gary Farmer). A brilliant scene in which he’s scrambling through the brush calling ‘Nobody! Nobody! Nobody!’ encapsulates the film’s strange and surreal beauty. - David Jenkins, Time Out

Trivia:
The film contains conversations in the Cree and Blackfoot languages, which were intentionally not translated or subtitled, for the exclusive understanding of members of those nations, including several in-jokes aimed at Native American viewers.


Offline George-2.0

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Re: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films
« Reply #57 on: October 09, 2018, 11:27:01 PM »
#27 – THE NAKED SPUR
"Now ain't that the way? A man gets set for trouble head-on and it sneaks up behind him every time!" - Ben Vandergroat


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48 points on 4 of 13 lists - Highest Ranking: #8 (Cole Stratton)

Director: Anthony Mann

Stars: James Stewart, Janet Leigh, Robert Ryan, Ralph Meeker, Millard Mitchell

Subgenre: Psychological Western

You’d think an Anthony Mann film that casts James Stewart in one of the darkest roles of his career would be arresting simply for Stewart. In fairness to Jimmy, he’s absolutely fantastic here, unhinged, vengeful, and hell-bent on bringing Robert Ryan’s despicable outlaw to justice. But while Ryan isn’t Mann’s lead, he is the source of all the conflict in The Naked Spur, the crafty, devious engine who drives all of the film’s action through chicanery and deceit. He’s a lot of fun to watch, especially in comparison with Stewart, who broods as Ryan schemes. Theirs is a psychological slugfest that’s atypical of the Western’s brawnier pugilist impulses, but under Mann’s meticulous direction, seeing that battle of wits play out proves every bit as pleasurable as watching an explosive gunfight. - Andy Crump, Paste

Trivia:
When this film was released in Spain, its title was changed to "Colorado Jim" and the name of James Stewart's character was also changed from "Howard Kemp" to "Colorado Jim", for unknown reasons.


Offline George-2.0

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Re: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films
« Reply #58 on: October 09, 2018, 11:28:28 PM »
#26 – YOUNG GUNS
”He ain't all there, is he?” (repeated line)


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49 points on 3 of 13 lists - Highest Ranking: #5 (Stethancantus, PsychoGoatee)

Director: Christopher Cain

Stars: Emilio Estevez, Kiefer Sutherland, Lou Diamond Phillips, Charlie Sheen, Dermot Mulroney, Casey Siemaszko, Terence Stamp, Jack Palance, Brian Keith

Subgenre: Outlaw Western

A group of young, hotheaded kids, including the infamous William H. Bonney (Emilio Estevez), are hired to help out British land-owner John Henry Tunstall (Terence Stamp). When their boss is killed, Bonney leads the group of gunslingers out to capture the murderers. Giving in to his rage, Bonney shoots the guilty men down instead of bringing them back to town, and he and his boys end up on the run from the law. - Rotten Tomatoes

Young Guns is best watched in the playful, none-too-serious spirit in which it was made. - Janet Maslin, New York Times

Trivia:
In the scene where the men are going through the Indian Village (Spirit World), Kiefer Sutherland's character "Doc" is shown in the front of the group with a cover on his face, but it is not Kiefer Sutherland. He left that morning before the scene was shot, due to the birth of his child.


Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: LoC #112 -Top 50 Western Films
« Reply #59 on: October 09, 2018, 11:51:04 PM »
Every time I've tried to watch DEADMAN I've not made it through. I'm not really a Jim Jarmusch.

The only one above that I've seen (all the way through) is YOUNG GUNS. Maybe I need to revisit it, because I wasn't all that impressed.

Gosh, here we are at the halfway point and my list hasn't been too well represented so far. Hope to have a better showing in the top half.
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