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Author Topic: Sesame Street muppet with autism  (Read 510 times)

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Offline Blasé

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Sesame Street muppet with autism
« on: May 10, 2017, 04:58:08 AM »

Julia

Judging from the feedback she's a big hit.   

I think they handled it well.  Educating children about autism and encouraging tolerance is a great idea.  Being an Asperger's kid myself I identify with her, especially her sensory processing issues.

I also have my doubts.  How can they show her autistic personality without it becoming a major downer?  Will she hold her hands over her ears in every single appearance?  Will they eventually portray her as happy-go-lucky and minimize the agony of being autistic?  Will they normalize autism making it a "personality type" reducing the urgency to treat it as a devastating disease? 

I'm curious what you riffers think.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: Sesame Street muppet with autism
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2017, 05:19:22 PM »
I haven't watched the episode, but I certainly appreciate that they are doing it.  And while Sesame Street occasionally has had missteps in the past (an earlier "black" muppet from the 70's was eventually retired because he read a little too much as a stereotype), I have faith they can get it right.  I think the key is to not stop everything when she arrives, but have her simply be part of the community and not to comment on it too much.  I mean, I'm sure a lot of people with such disabilities don't stop everything to talk about it, so why would she.  Have her around even when she and/or her condition isn't the focus.  And knowing Sesame Street, they can also focus on what she can do rather than what she can't.


Offline Blasé

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Re: Sesame Street muppet with autism
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2017, 11:05:19 AM »
I haven't watched the episode, but I certainly appreciate that they are doing it.  And while Sesame Street occasionally has had missteps in the past (an earlier "black" muppet from the 70's was eventually retired because he read a little too much as a stereotype), I have faith they can get it right.  I think the key is to not stop everything when she arrives, but have her simply be part of the community and not to comment on it too much.  I mean, I'm sure a lot of people with such disabilities don't stop everything to talk about it, so why would she.  Have her around even when she and/or her condition isn't the focus.  And knowing Sesame Street, they can also focus on what she can do rather than what she can't.

Yo, check it.  Beautiful progressivism.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKCdV20zLMs

When they sing at the end I get teary eyed.  Well, actually I get teary eyed all the way through.  I really care about the autism issue.