Author Topic: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95  (Read 24257 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline CJones

  • Bilbo Baggins Balladeer
  • ******
  • Posts: 4014
  • Liked: 693
  • 5000 deaths and counting
Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #30 on: August 17, 2016, 11:03:19 AM »
How can Leonard Nimoy make the list without someone mentioning this?

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/AGF5ROpjRAU" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/AGF5ROpjRAU</a>


Offline Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 27762
  • Liked: 5616
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #31 on: August 17, 2016, 12:55:52 PM »
That's just a black square for me, since Youtube clips don't play here anymore. But I'm just going to assume that it's Nimoy singing Bilbo Baggins.



Offline CJones

  • Bilbo Baggins Balladeer
  • ******
  • Posts: 4014
  • Liked: 693
  • 5000 deaths and counting
Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #32 on: August 17, 2016, 02:04:38 PM »
That's just a black square for me, since Youtube clips don't play here anymore. But I'm just going to assume that it's Nimoy singing Bilbo Baggins.

It is.

I'm using Firefox, and I still see everything just fine.


Offline PsychoGoatee

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1010
  • Liked: 122
  • We are the road crew!
Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #33 on: August 17, 2016, 04:34:34 PM »

And love for Nemoy as well.
Not enough love to spell his name correctly, apparently. But it's the thought that counts.

I noticed several posts including the official countdown one misspelled Leslie Nielsen, but I was cool about it.  :P How come you didn't hassle our host about that? Sall good.

I think this list should have an honorable mention to the Ayatollah of Rock n Rolla, the guy who played Lord Humongus in Road Warrior.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2gVXd7FzhQ
« Last Edit: August 17, 2016, 05:38:58 PM by PsychoGoatee »


Online Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 25916
  • Liked: 4959
  • Mr. Robot
Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #34 on: August 17, 2016, 05:48:08 PM »
#39
Audrey Hepburn

32 Points, 3 Lists, #10 Fred Garvin

Whozat?
Audrey Hepburn (born Audrey Kathleen Ruston; 4 May 1929 – 20 January 1993) was a British actress. Recognised as a film and fashion icon, Hepburn was active during Hollywood's Golden Age. She was ranked by the American Film Institute as the third-greatest female screen legend in Golden Age Hollywood and was inducted into the International Best Dressed List Hall of Fame. Born in Ixelles, a district of Brussels, Hepburn spent her childhood between Belgium, England and the Netherlands. In Amsterdam, she studied ballet with Sonia Gaskell before moving to London in 1948, continuing her ballet training with Marie Rambert, and then performing as a chorus girl in West End musical theatre productions.

Following minor appearances in several films, Hepburn starred in the 1951 Broadway play Gigi after being spotted by French novelist Colette, on whose work the play was based. She shot to stardom for playing the lead role in Roman Holiday (1953), for which she was the first actress to win an Academy Award, a Golden Globe and a BAFTA Award for a single performance. The same year Hepburn won a Tony Award for Best Lead Actress in a Play for her performance in Ondine. She went on to star in a number of successful films, such as Sabrina (1954), The Nun's Story (1959), Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961), Charade (1963), My Fair Lady (1964) and Wait Until Dark (1967), for which she received Academy Award, Golden Globe and BAFTA nominations. Hepburn won a record three BAFTA Awards for Best British Actress in a Leading Role. In recognition of her film career, she was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from BAFTA, the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award and the Special Tony Award. She remains one of the few people who have won Academy, Emmy, Grammy and Tony Awards.

Hepburn appeared in fewer films as her life went on, devoting much of her later life to UNICEF. She had contributed to the organisation since 1954, then worked in some of the poorest communities of Africa, South America and Asia between 1988 and 1992. She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in recognition of her work as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador in December 1992. A month later, Hepburn died of appendiceal cancer at her home in Switzerland at the age of 63.

You Might Remember Her As...
Sabrina Fairchild in Sabrina, Princess Ann in Roman Holiday, Eliza Dolittle in My Fair Lady and the Woman Who Ate Precious Stones and Jewels in Breakfast at Tiffany's.

Try Not to Remember Her From
Charade is something of a divisive movie and at a quick glance I don't know which of her movies were trainwreck so... I dunno.  (Always is considered one of Speilberg's sappier movies, but I haven't seen it in forever).

Hey, Don't Forget to Check Out
They All Laughed, a movie that is much better received now than when it was first released.

Last Appearance

It wasn't really acting (in the conventional sense) but she was the host of a documentary series called Gardens of the World in 1993.

Casting Idea

Has she ever played a crazy or evil person.  Looking at her pictures, she has such a penetrating gaze that I think would be good in a spookier performance.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/lB2ckiy_qlQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/lB2ckiy_qlQ</a>


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Not Quite Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11596
  • Liked: 2559
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #35 on: August 17, 2016, 06:14:21 PM »
Try Not to Remember Her From
Charade is something of a divisive movie and at a quick glance I don't know which of her movies were trainwreck so... I dunno.  (Always is considered one of Speilberg's sappier movies, but I haven't seen it in forever).

Speilberg?  Trainwreck?  Divisive?

Are you sure you are thinking of the correct movie?  With Cary Grant, Walter Matthau, James Coburn.  Music by Henry Mancini...

No one named Speilberg involved even when I look at the full credits.   ???


Offline ColeStratton

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 772
  • Liked: 290
  • I'm king of the room!
    • SF Sketchfest
Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #36 on: August 17, 2016, 06:23:33 PM »
Try Not to Remember Her From
Charade is something of a divisive movie and at a quick glance I don't know which of her movies were trainwreck so... I dunno.  (Always is considered one of Speilberg's sappier movies, but I haven't seen it in forever).

Speilberg?  Trainwreck?  Divisive?

Are you sure you are thinking of the correct movie?  With Cary Grant, Walter Matthau, James Coburn.  Music by Henry Mancini...

No one named Speilberg involved even when I look at the full credits.   ???

That would be "Always," which is a remake of "A Guy Named Joe" and it's just ok. Charade, however, is magic. And it was in the public domain forever so there's tons of really bad prints of it out there. But then Criterion got ahold of it and now it looks niiiiice.
My website!: www.colestratton.com
My podcast!: www.popmyculturepodcast.com
My comedy fest!: www.sfsketchfest.com
My goodness!


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Not Quite Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11596
  • Liked: 2559
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #37 on: August 17, 2016, 06:31:36 PM »
Always makes more sense, I think I've only seen parts of that, looked like failed attempt at a comedy/drama...

Oh, and yes, the Criterion Blu-Ray of Charade is very, very nice...
« Last Edit: August 17, 2016, 06:33:33 PM by MartyS (Gromit) »


Online Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 25916
  • Liked: 4959
  • Mr. Robot
Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #38 on: August 17, 2016, 06:52:52 PM »
Always makes more sense, I think I've only seen parts of that, looked like failed attempt at a comedy/drama...

Oh, and yes, the Criterion Blu-Ray of Charade is very, very nice...

Yeah, I suggested two.  I've never seen Charade but I've heard a lot of people say it's a fun Hitchcock-esque movie and others saying it's a pale imitation.  I'll be happy to check it out myself.  I like fun, silly thrillers myself, so I wouldn't be surprised if I was one of the people who liked it.  (I also like the original Italian Job, which is similarly divisive).


Online Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 25916
  • Liked: 4959
  • Mr. Robot
Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #39 on: August 17, 2016, 06:54:34 PM »
#38
James "Jimmy" Stewart

32 Points, 3 Lists, #9 Cole Stratton

Whozat?
James Maitland Stewart was born on 20 May 1908 in Indiana, Pennsylvania, to Elizabeth Ruth (Johnson) and Alexander Maitland Stewart, who owned a hardware store. He was of Scottish, Ulster-Scots, and some English, descent.

Stewart was educated at a local prep school, Mercersburg Academy, where he was a keen athlete (football and track), musician (singing and accordion playing), and sometime actor. In 1929 he won a place at Princeton, where he studied architecture with some success and became further involved with the performing arts as a musician and actor with the University Players.

After graduation, engagements with the University Players took him around the northeastern United States, including a run on Broadway in 1932. But work dried up as the Great Depression deepened, and it wasn't until 1934, when he followed his friend Henry Fonda to Hollywood, that things began to pick up.

After his first screen appearance in Art Trouble (1934), he worked for a time for MGM as a contract player and slowly began making a name for himself in increasingly high-profile roles throughout the rest of the 1930s. His famous collaborations with Frank Capra, in You Can't Take It with You (1938), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), and, after World War II, It's a Wonderful Life (1946) helped to launch his career as a star and to establish his screen persona as the likable everyman.

Having learned to fly in 1935, he was drafted into the U.S. Army in 1940 as a private (after twice failing the medical for being underweight). During the course of World War II he rose to the rank of colonel, first as an instructor at home in the United States, and later on combat missions in Europe. He remained involved with the U.S. Air Force Reserve after the war and retired in 1959 as a brigadier general.

Stewart's acting career took off properly after the war. During the course of his long professional life he had roles in some of Hollywood's best remembered films, starring in a string of Westerns (bringing his "everyman" qualities to movies like The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962)), biopics (The Stratton Story (1949), The Glenn Miller Story (1954), and The Spirit of St. Louis (1957), for instance) thrillers (most notably his frequent collaborations with Alfred Hitchcock) and even some screwball comedies .

He continued to work into the 1990s and died at the age of 89 in 1997.

You Might Remember Him As...
Elwood P. Dowd in Harvey, Jefferson Smith in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Scottie Ferguson in Vertigo, The Richest Man in Town in It's a Wonderful Life

Try Not to Remember Him From
The Magic of Lassie (Lassie's close up card tricks are impressive, though.)

Hey, Don't Forget to Check Out
I've heard good things about Destry Rides Again.

Last Appearance

He played Wylie Burp, the sharp-shooting dog in An American Tail: Fievel Goes West.

Casting Idea

It seems like a shame that Stewart never worked with the younger Speilberg.  I feel like they might work well together.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/zWyEc7FAMTg" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/zWyEc7FAMTg</a>


Offline PsychoGoatee

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1010
  • Liked: 122
  • We are the road crew!
Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #40 on: August 17, 2016, 07:53:43 PM »
Rear Window is my fav Jimmy Stewart flick, anybody who's popular enough to do impressions of is probably a good sign of being awesome. In good company with Chris Walken on this list here.

With a friend of mine the "you're a real apt pupil!" line from Vertigo is the go-to for Stewart impressions.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2016, 07:56:04 PM by PsychoGoatee »


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Not Quite Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11596
  • Liked: 2559
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #41 on: August 17, 2016, 08:05:49 PM »
Yeah, I suggested two.  I've never seen Charade but I've heard a lot of people say it's a fun Hitchcock-esque movie and others saying it's a pale imitation.

Yeah, I read what was in parentheses wrong the first time.

Well, I would never think Charade was trying to be Hitchcock-esque, I guess people compare it to North By Northwest just because they both have Cary Grant?  I suppose back when it came out having tension and a little fear in a comedy was rare, but now it's not so no reason to say it's trying to be a funny Hitchcock type film.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2016, 08:50:15 PM by MartyS (Gromit) »


Online Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 25916
  • Liked: 4959
  • Mr. Robot
Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #42 on: August 17, 2016, 08:46:21 PM »
#37
Chris Pratt

33 Points, 2 Lists, #6 Russoguru

Whozat?
Pratt was waiting tables at the Bubba Gump Shrimp Company restaurant in Maui when the 19-year-old was discovered by actress, director and City Limits star Rae Dawn Chong. She cast him in her directorial debut, the short horror film Cursed Part 3, which was filmed in Los Angeles.

Pratt's first regular television role was as Harold Brighton "Bright" Abbott on the series Everwood.  After Everwood's cancellation, he joined the cast of The O.C. for its fourth season, playing activist Winchester "Ché" Cook. He also had an appearance in the 2008 action film Wanted.

Pratt read for the lead role of Captain James T. Kirk in the 2009 film Star Trek, and for Jake Sully in the 2009 film Avatar. The latter audition was particularly humbling for Pratt, who recalls: "They said they want somebody that has 'that thing', that 'it factor'. I walked into that room knowing that I did not have that thing, and I walked out thinking I would never have that thing, probably." Pratt resolved to rethink his career ambitions, commenting: "People have to work. I just don't want it to be at a fucking restaurant."

In 2009, Pratt began playing the dimwitted but lovable Andy Dwyer on the NBC comedy series Parks and Recreation. Originally meant to be a temporary character, Andy was so likable that producers asked Pratt back as a series regular. This led to the character being written much more sympathetically at the start of season two.

Although Pratt had been known until that point for playing supporting characters, and was best known as his portly Parks and Recreation character, that changed in 2014 when he headlined two feature films, the first of which was The Lego Movie. The film became the third-highest-grossing film of 2014 in North America. This was followed that August by Guardians of the Galaxy, which became the highest-grossing film of 2014 in North America, making Pratt the star of two of the top five highest-grossing films of that year.

In November 2013, Pratt, an avid fan of Jurassic Park, who has referred to that film as "my Star Wars", replaced Josh Brolin as the lead in the film Jurassic World (2015). He played Owen Grady, who works training Velociraptors.He will reprise his role in a sequel, which is set for a June 22, 2018 release.

You Might Remember Him As...
Starlord in Guardians of the Galaxy, Emmet Brickowski in The Lego Movie, Andy Dwyer in Parks and Recreation, The Dino-Cycle Man in Jurassic World

Try Not to Remember Him From
Bride Wars.  A lot of genuinely talented people sucked into that abyss of lameness.

Hey, Don't Forget to Check Out
It's not obscure, but he was in Moneyball, a movie I rather liked.

Coming Up

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, the remake of a remake The Magnificent Seven (looks like it could be fun) and the science fiction film Passengers (reading the description, it sounds like it could be a good drama, so I hope it doesn't turn out to just be some action and/or horror movie).

Casting Idea

He needs to do straight on comedy again.  I also think his sensibility would be great for another Miller/Lord project.  Maybe all of them.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/qs2g-WmJ4KA" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/qs2g-WmJ4KA</a>


Offline stethacantus

  • Big Montana
  • *****
  • Posts: 697
  • Liked: 60
Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #43 on: August 17, 2016, 08:50:49 PM »
You Might Remember Him As...
Johnnie Grey in the General, Sherlock Jr. in Sherlock Jr., Alfred Butler in Battling Butler, and Mickey Mouse in Steamboat Bill Jr.

I am going to assume that was meant to be a joke. Buster played the title character in Steamboat Bill Jr., or more specific, William Canfield Jr., son of Captain "Bill" Canfield. Walt Disney parodied the same movie a few months later with Steamboat Willie, which was the screen debut of  Mickey Mouse. Since most people avoid silent films, they are more likely to remember Keaton as Erronius in the musical A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum ( 1966 ), as the train conductor in Around the World in 80 Days ( 1956 ), in his very brief cameo as one of Norma Desmond's bridge playing friends in Sunset Boulevard ( 1950 ) and his even shorter blink or you will miss it cameo as Jimmy, the owner of Culpepper's getaway boat in It's a Mad,Mad, Mad, Mad World ( 1963 ). And of course there were those damn Beach Party movies.


Try Not to Remember Him From
How to Stuff a Wild Bikini (he was in a surprising number of 60's Beach movies).  Also, I know this may be controversial, but I really don't care for It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.

Film historian Kevin Brownlow may argue with you on this one. Not only did he proclaim Boom on the Moon ( 1946 ) Keaton's worst feature film, but "The worst film ever made." I take it he did not care much for it. Boom on the Moon was a science fiction film Keaton made for a Mexican movie studio ( original title El Moderno Barba Azul which translates to "The Modern Day Bluebeard" ) and was the very first film produced by Alexander Salkind.

And yes, It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World was a failure. Stanley Kramer had no business trying to direct a comedy, and knew nothing about properly staging comedy stunts. However, the movie is so overblown that it is still entertaining to watch. And the cast is very talented, and able to do wonders with the weak material they were given. Still, if you want to see the same basic plot done right then I would suggest seeing Rat Race ( 2001 ).


Hey, Don't Forget to Check Out
I don't know which one is the best of his more obscure works, but there's a Twilight Zone episode he's in that's fairly silly (and certainly one of the better comedy episodes of the show, since those usually turn out bad).

No one has more obscure works than Buster Keaton. To this day they are still rediscovering industrial films he made during the 50s and 60s. And he made a lot of television appearances, my favorite being his appearance on Candid Camera. And he made a lot of television commercials. Buster loved doing the obscure stuff because it was the only place left where he had creative control over his work. But for my money, the best of his obscure work was The Railrodder made for the National Film Board of Canada in 1965. It is currently out of print on DVD, but thankfully is available on YouTube in it's 25 minute entirety.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/epfOOodUzHI" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/epfOOodUzHI</a>


Last Appearance
His last appearance was in a Lucille Balle special called Lucy in London

This one is new to me. None of my Buster Keaton books lists Buster as guest starring on Here's Lucy. Also, Buster died in February of 1966, so I do not really see how he could have been in a show that was shot later the same year. And yet, IMDb does list him in the cast, and there are stills of Buster and Lucy allegedly from the show. Like I said, Buster did so much work in his final years that they are still rediscovering the odd industrial film and television guest appearance.

However, the accepted final appearance of Buster Keaton is the movie War Italian Style which was shot in 1965, but not put in general release until 1967. And yet, this can't even be called his final appearance. In 1962 Keaton was in a movie called Ten Girls Ago which was never released. The producer went bankrupt during post production. There has been a lot of talk about one of the video companies financing the completion of this movie, but so far it has never happened. But if it ever is completed and released, it would be a final feature film with Buster Keaton in the cast ( Also, the final appearances of  Burt Lahr and Eddie Foy Jr. )

Casting Idea
I admit I don't know the best way to use his talents, but how cool would it have been if the three big names in silent comedy: Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton did a film where they can mix their various comedy stylings.

Probably not a good idea. Buster Keaton and Charlie Chaplin appeared together in Limelight ( 1952 ) and Chaplin had most of Keaton's performance edited out of the film. I can't imagine what would have happend if all three were in the same movie.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2016, 08:52:20 PM by stethacantus »


Online Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 25916
  • Liked: 4959
  • Mr. Robot
Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #44 on: August 17, 2016, 09:09:51 PM »
You Might Remember Him As...
Johnnie Grey in the General, Sherlock Jr. in Sherlock Jr., Alfred Butler in Battling Butler, and Mickey Mouse in Steamboat Bill Jr.

I am going to assume that was meant to be a joke. Buster played the title character in Steamboat Bill Jr., or more specific, William Canfield Jr., son of Captain "Bill" Canfield. Walt Disney parodied the same movie a few months later with Steamboat Willie, which was the screen debut of  Mickey Mouse. Since most people avoid silent films, they are more likely to remember Keaton as Erronius in the musical A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum ( 1966 ), as the train conductor in Around the World in 80 Days ( 1956 ), in his very brief cameo as one of Norma Desmond's bridge playing friends in Sunset Boulevard ( 1950 ) and his even shorter blink or you will miss it cameo as Jimmy, the owner of Culpepper's getaway boat in It's a Mad,Mad, Mad, Mad World ( 1963 ). And of course there were those damn Beach Party movies.

Yeah, excet for the first entry I've been putting joke credits in each one (not particularly good ones, but I'm tired, yo.  It's been a busy week).