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Author Topic: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95  (Read 24261 times)

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Offline PsychoGoatee

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Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #15 on: August 16, 2016, 07:29:23 AM »
Another fun Richard Dreyfuss comedy to check out is Let It Ride, with Teri Garr and Jennifer Tilly.

Wow, only 3 lists with Sir Patrick?  And no mention of Dune, some folk around here ain't gonna like that... ;D   If you can find the long version of the TV miniseries Moby Dick he is great in that, there's a short version that came out first on DVD that was edited poorly.

He also rules in Excalibur! I actually have a life-size cardboard cutout of Captain Picard that I've had since High School, and I didn't put him on my list. Man it's tough to keep it to 25. He was awesome in Green Room recently as the villain.

Also shocking that somebody like Christopher Walken almost didn't make it, you weren't kidding about every vote counting.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2016, 07:31:43 AM by PsychoGoatee »


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #16 on: August 16, 2016, 07:32:43 AM »
#45
Gene Wilder

27 Points, 3 Lists, #4 Cole Stratton

Whozat?

Jerome Silberman (born June 11, 1933), known professionally as Gene Wilder, is an American stage and screen comic actor, screenwriter, and author.

Wilder began his career on stage, and made his screen debut in the TV-series Armstrong Circle Theatre in 1962. Although his first film role was portraying a hostage in the 1967 motion picture Bonnie and Clyde, Wilder's first major role was as Leopold Bloom in the 1968 film The Producers for which he was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. This was the first in a series of collaborations with writer/director Mel Brooks, including 1974's Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein, which Wilder co-wrote, garnering the pair an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay. Wilder is known for his portrayal of Willy Wonka in Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971) and for his four films with Richard Pryor: Silver Streak (1976), Stir Crazy (1980), See No Evil, Hear No Evil (1989), and Another You (1991). Wilder has directed and written several of his films, including The Woman in Red (1984).

His third wife was actress Gilda Radner, with whom he starred in three films. Her death from ovarian cancer led to his active involvement in promoting cancer awareness and treatment, helping found the Gilda Radner Ovarian Cancer Detection Center in Los Angeles and co-founding Gilda's Club.

Since his most recent contribution to acting in 2003, Wilder has turned his attention to writing. He has produced a memoir in 2005, Kiss Me Like a Stranger: My Search for Love and Art; a collection of stories, What Is This Thing Called Love? (2010); and the novels My French Whore (2007), The Woman Who Wouldn't (2008) and Something to Remember You By (2013).

You Might Remember Him As...
Willy Wonka in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, Dr. Frederic Frankenstein in Young Frankenstein,  Leo Bloom in The Producers, The Shaky Hand Kid in Blazing Saddles

Try Not to Remember Him From
Haunted Honeymoon

Hey, Don't Forget to Check Out
He has a small role in Bonnie and Clyde that's worth checking out (thought the whole movie is great).

Coming Up
His appearance was on some will  Will & Grace.  IMDB also says he appeared in The Yo! Gabba! Gabba! Movie 2, but outside of imdb and the Yo Gabba Gabba wiki, it doesn't actually look like it exists.  I think someone is fan-ficcing us.

Casting Idea

He's retired now, but I bet he could have taken an Albert Brooks-like turn as a scary fucking crime boss.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/3svB0cl3gGs" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/3svB0cl3gGs</a>


Offline PsychoGoatee

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Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #17 on: August 16, 2016, 07:43:52 AM »
Gene Wilder is great, Young Frankenstein is one of my favs. Definitely an original. And he's even made it to a meme on the internet age with those Willy Wonka reaction pics.  ;D

I have a feeling my favorite Doctor/Baron Frankenstein isn't making it onto this list, but you never know. Lot of picks left.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #18 on: August 16, 2016, 08:57:19 AM »
#44
Buster Keaton

29 Points, 2 Lists, #3 Fred Garvin

Whozat?

Joseph Frank "Buster" Keaton (October 4, 1895 – February 1, 1966) was an American actor, director, producer, writer, and stunt performer. He was best known for his silent films, in which his trademark was physical comedy with a consistently stoic, deadpan expression, earning him the nickname "The Great Stone Face".  Keaton was recognized as the seventh-greatest film director by Entertainment Weekly.  In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Keaton the 21st greatest male star of Classic Hollywood Cinema.  Critic Roger Ebert wrote of Keaton's "extraordinary period from 1920 to 1929, [when] he worked without interruption on a series of films that make him, arguably, the greatest actor-director in the history of the movies".  His career declined afterward with a dispiriting loss of his artistic independence when he was hired by MGM, which resulted in a crippling alcoholism that ruined his family life. He recovered in the 1940s, remarried, and revived his career to a degree as an honored comic performer for the rest of his life, earning an Academy Honorary Award in 1959.


You Might Remember Him As...
Johnnie Grey in the General, Sherlock Jr. in Sherlock Jr., Alfred Butler in Battling Butler, and Mickey Mouse in Steamboat Bill Jr.

Try Not to Remember Him From
How to Stuff a Wild Bikini (he was in a surprising number of 60's Beach movies).  Also, I know this may be controversial, but I really don't care for It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.

Hey, Don't Forget to Check Out
I don't know which one is the best of his more obscure works, but there's a Twilight Zone episode he's in that's fairly silly (and certainly one of the better comedy episodes of the show, since those usually turn out bad).

Last Appearance
His last appearance was in a Lucille Balle special called Lucy in London

Casting Idea
I admit I don't know the best way to use his talents, but how cool would it have been if the three big names in silent comedy: Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton did a film where they can mix their various comedy stylings.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/JzZYZj0i3Og" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/JzZYZj0i3Og</a>


Offline Tripe

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Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #19 on: August 16, 2016, 09:06:06 AM »
Last Appearance
His last appearance was in a Lucille Balle special called Lucy in London
Fascinating, depends on if you're British or not...


Offline Russoguru

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Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #20 on: August 16, 2016, 02:56:15 PM »
Wonderful list so far!  ;D


Offline CJones

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Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #21 on: August 16, 2016, 03:20:28 PM »
So far I've had Patrick Steward and Gene Wilder. I thought I had had Leslie Nielson, but I must have cut him.

Buster Keaton kinda reminds me of lead character from Mr Robot.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #22 on: August 16, 2016, 04:19:35 PM »
#43
Michael Caine

30 Points, 2 Lists, #5 CJones

Whozat?
Sir Michael Caine, CBE (born Maurice Joseph Micklewhite; 14 March 1933) is an English actor and author. Renowned for his distinctive working class cockney accent, Caine has appeared in over 115 films and is regarded as a British film icon.

He made his breakthrough in the 1960s with starring roles in a number of acclaimed British films, including Zulu (1964), The Ipcress File (1965), Alfie (1966), for which he was nominated for an Academy Award, The Italian Job (1969), and Battle of Britain (1969). His most notable roles in the 1970s included Get Carter (1971), The Last Valley, Sleuth (1972), for which he earned his second Academy Award nomination, The Man Who Would Be King (1975), and A Bridge Too Far (1977). He achieved some of his greatest critical success in the 1980s, with Educating Rita (1983) earning him the BAFTA and Golden Globe Award for Best Actor. In 1986, he received an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in Woody Allen's Hannah and Her Sisters.

Caine played Ebenezer Scrooge in The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992). Having by that time practically retired from acting on the big screen, he enjoyed a career resurgence in the late 1990s, receiving his second Golden Globe Award for his performance in Little Voice in 1998 and receiving his second Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for The Cider House Rules the following year. Caine played Nigel Powers in the 2002 parody Austin Powers in Goldmember, and Alfred Pennyworth in Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight Trilogy. He appeared in several other of Nolan's films including The Prestige (2006), Inception (2010), and Interstellar (2014). He also appeared as a supporting character in Alfonso Cuarón's Children of Men and Pixar's 2011 film Cars 2. As of 2015, films in which he has starred have grossed over $7.4 billion worldwide. Caine is ranked the ninth highest grossing box office star.

Caine is one of only two actors nominated for an Academy Award for acting in every decade from the 1960s to 2000s (the other one being Jack Nicholson; Laurence Olivier was also nominated for an acting Academy Award in five different decades, beginning in 1939 and ending in 1978). In 2000, Caine was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in recognition of his contribution to cinema.

You Might Remember Him As...
Alfie Elkins in Alfie, Elliot in Hannah and Her Sisters, Dr. Wilbur Larch in the Cider House Rules and Robin, the Boy Wonder in the Batman movies.

Try Not to Remember Him From
Jaws: The Revenge.  “I have never seen it, but by all accounts it is terrible. However, I have seen the house that it built, and it is terrific.” - Michael Caine

Hey, Don't Forget to Check Out
He's a pretty good Scrooge in A Muppet Christmas Carol.

Coming Up

Michael Caine will appear in the remake of the 1979 old man caper movie Going in Style.

Casting Idea

Though Michael Caine cartainly hasn't stopped doing comedy, I think I would like to see a good latter day comedy director like Edgar Wright or Taika Waititi take advantage of his comedic chops. 

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/XRLNbKiDQJQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/XRLNbKiDQJQ</a>


Offline PsychoGoatee

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Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #23 on: August 16, 2016, 04:32:21 PM »
Casting Idea

Though Michael Caine cartainly hasn't stopped doing comedy, I think I would like to see a good latter day comedy director like Edgar Wright or Taika Waititi take advantage of his comedic chops. 


Sounds good to me! Michael Caine is great, love Get Carter. DeathTrap is cool too.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #24 on: August 16, 2016, 06:50:06 PM »
#42
Peter Sellers

30 Points, 3 Lists, #8 MartyS (Gromit)

Whozat?
Peter Sellers, CBE (born Richard Henry Sellers; 8 September 1925 – 24 July 1980) was an English film actor, comedian and singer. He performed in the BBC Radio comedy series The Goon Show, featured on a number of hit comic songs and became known to a worldwide audience through his many film characterisations, among them Chief Inspector Clouseau in The Pink Panther series of films.

Born in Portsmouth, Sellers made his stage debut at the Kings Theatre, Southsea, when he was two weeks old. He began accompanying his parents in a variety act that toured the provincial theatres. He first worked as a drummer and toured around England as a member of the Entertainments National Service Association (ENSA). He developed his mimicry and improvisational skills during a spell in Ralph Reader's wartime Gang Show entertainment troupe, which toured Britain and the Far East. After the war, Sellers made his radio debut in ShowTime, and eventually became a regular performer on various BBC radio shows. During the early 1950s, Sellers, along with Spike Milligan, Harry Secombe and Michael Bentine, took part in the successful radio series The Goon Show, which ended in 1960.

Sellers began his film career during the 1950s. Although the bulk of his work was comedic-based, often parodying characters of authority such as military officers or policemen, he also performed in other film genres and roles. Films demonstrating his artistic range include I'm All Right Jack (1959), Stanley Kubrick's Lolita (1962) and Dr. Strangelove (1964), What's New, Pussycat? (1965), Casino Royale (1967), The Party (1968), Being There (1979) and the five films of the Pink Panther series (1963–78). Sellers's versatility enabled him to portray a wide range of comic characters using different accents and guises, and he would often assume multiple roles within the same film, frequently with contrasting temperaments and styles. Satire and black humour were major features of many of his films, and his performances had a strong influence on a number of later comedians. Sellers was nominated three times for an Academy Award, twice for the Academy Award for Best Actor for his performances in Dr. Strangelove and Being There, and once for the Academy Award for Best Live Action Short Film for The Running Jumping & Standing Still Film (1960). He won the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role twice, for I'm All Right Jack and for the original Pink Panther film, The Pink Panther (1963) and was nominated as Best Actor three times. In 1980 he won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy for his role in Being There, and also earned three other Golden Globe nominations in the same category. Turner Classic Movies calls Sellers "one of the most accomplished comic actors of the late 20th century."

In his personal life, Sellers struggled with depression and insecurities. An enigmatic figure, he often claimed to have no identity outside the roles that he played. His behaviour was often erratic and compulsive, and he frequently clashed with his directors and co-stars, especially in the mid-1970s when his physical and mental health, together with his alcohol and drug problems, were at their worst. Sellers was married four times, and had three children from his first two marriages. He died as a result of a heart attack in 1980, aged 54. English filmmakers the Boulting brothers described Sellers as "the greatest comic genius this country has produced since Charles Chaplin."

You Might Remember Him As...
Doctor Strangelove (and others) in Doctor Strangelove or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, Inspector Clouseau in the Pink Panther films, Chance in Being There and Alice the Goon in the Goon Show.

Try Not to Remember Him From
The Fiendish Plot of Doctor Fu Manchu is pretty bad.

Hey, Don't Forget to Check Out
I haven't seen it, but the Mouse the Roared looks like it was a pretty fun romp.

Last Appearance

His last appearance was in the much hated "The Trail of the Pink Panther", which was largely made up of deleted scenes from other Panther films.

Casting Idea

That's a tough one.  I Feel like he was destined to be a villain (a scary one) in a children's movie, but I don't think it ever happened.  I tried thinking if there was a Roald Dahl role but I dunno.  MAYBE Mr. Twit from The Twits (what a mean-spirited kids movie that would be).

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/6T2uBeiNXAo" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/6T2uBeiNXAo</a>


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #25 on: August 17, 2016, 07:17:49 AM »
#41
Leonard Nimoy

31 Points, 2 Lists, #1 Russoguru

Whozat?
Leonard Simon Nimoy (March 26, 1931 – February 27, 2015) was an American actor, film director, photographer, author, singer and songwriter. He was known for his role as Spock of the Star Trek franchise, a character he portrayed in television and film from a pilot episode shot in late 1964 to his final film performance released in 2013.

Nimoy began his career in his early twenties, teaching acting classes in Hollywood and making minor film and television appearances through the 1950s, as well as playing the title role in Kid Monk Baroni. Foreshadowing his fame as a semi-alien, he played Narab, one of three Martian invaders in the 1952 movie serial Zombies of the Stratosphere.

In December 1964, he made his first appearance in the rejected Star Trek pilot "The Cage", and went on to play the character of Spock until the end of the production run in early 1969, followed by eight feature films and guest slots in the various spin-off series. The character has had a significant cultural impact and garnered Nimoy three Emmy Award nominations; TV Guide named Spock one of the 50 greatest TV characters. After the original Star Trek series, Nimoy starred in Mission: Impossible for two seasons, hosted the documentary series In Search of..., narrated Civilization IV, and made several well-received stage appearances. He also had a recurring role in the science fiction series Fringe.

Nimoy's profile as Spock was such that both of his autobiographies, I Am Not Spock (1975) and I Am Spock (1995), were written from the viewpoint of sharing his existence with the character. In 2015 an asteroid was named 4864 Nimoy in his honor.  In 2016, a feature documentary, For the Love of Spock, was released that covered his life and career.

You Might Remember Him As...
Spock in Star Trek, Dr. William Bell in Fringe, the narrating bigfoot in In Search Of..., some Transformers

Try Not to Remember Him From
Star Trek V: Spock's Brother with the Magic Feelings and Also God

Hey, Don't Forget to Check Out
He has a great turn in the 1978 remake of The Invasion of the Body Snatchers.

Last Appearance

He had a couple cameos in the last two Star Treks.

Casting Idea

I'm surprised he didn't do more voice work.  He did a bit but I think he would be very good in a Pixar movie (and video games).

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/UrgvBYZwS9k" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/UrgvBYZwS9k</a>


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #26 on: August 17, 2016, 07:26:33 AM »
He was also awesome as the narrator in Civilization IV.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #27 on: August 17, 2016, 08:28:43 AM »
#40
Frances McDormand

32 Points, 2 Lists, #5 Asbestos Bill

Whozat?
McDormand was born in Chicago, Illinois, and was adopted by a couple originally from Canada – Noreen E. (Nickleson), a registered nurse and receptionist, and Vernon W. McDormand, a Disciples of Christ pastor. She has said that her biological mother may have been one of the parishioners at Vernon's church. She has a sister, Dorothy A. McDormand, who is an ordained Disciples of Christ minister and chaplain, as well as another sibling, both of whom were adopted by the McDormands, who had no biological children. As her father specialized in restoring congregations,[3] he frequently moved their family, and they lived in several small towns in Illinois, Georgia, Kentucky, and Tennessee, before settling in Monessen, Pennsylvania, where she graduated from Monessen High School in 1975. McDormand attended Bethany College in West Virginia, earning a Bachelor of Arts in theater in 1979. In 1982, she earned a Master of Fine Arts from the Yale School of Drama. She was a roommate of Holly Hunter at the time.

McDormand's first professional acting job was in Trinidad and Tobago, performing in a play written by Derek Walcott and funded by the MacArthur Foundation. Her film debut was in the 1984 Coen brothers first film, Blood Simple. In 1985, Frances, Holly Hunter and director Sam Raimi shared a house in The Bronx.  In 1987, she appeared as the wacky friend Dot in the hit film Raising Arizona, starring Holly Hunter and Nicolas Cage. In addition to her early film roles, McDormand played Connie Chapman in the fifth season of the television police drama Hill Street Blues. In 1988, she played Stella Kowalski in a stage production of Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, for which she was nominated for a Tony Award. McDormand is an associate member of the experimental theater company The Wooster Group.

McDormand appeared in several theatrical and television roles during the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s. She has gained renown and critical acclaim for her dramatic work, and is a respected actress, having been nominated for Academy Awards four times. In 1988, she was nominated for a Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Mississippi Burning. In 1996, she won the Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance as police chief Marge Gunderson in Fargo. In 2000, she was nominated for the Best Actress in a Supporting Role and the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture for her portrayal of an overbearing mother in Almost Famous. For her role in Wonder Boys (2000), she won Best Supporting Actress from the Broadcast Film Critics Association, the Florida Film Critics Circle, and the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. In 2006, McDormand received her fourth nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in 2005's North Country, although she lost to Rachel Weisz. She also had a role in the film Friends with Money, a dark comedy co-starring Jennifer Aniston, Catherine Keener, and Joan Cusack, and directed by Nicole Holofcener. She received an Independent Spirit Award for her role in Friends with Money.

McDormand has recently starred in the films Burn After Reading and Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day. McDormand starred in Transformers: Dark of the Moon, the sequel after Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen. She played the US government's National Intelligence Director, alongside Burn After Reading co-star John Malkovich. She returned to the stage in the David Lindsay-Abaire play Good People, in a limited engagement on Broadway from February 8, 2011 to May 29, 2011.[8][9] Her performance earned her a Tony Award win for Best Leading Actress in a Play.  In November 2014, HBO telecast a four-part mini-series based upon the series of short stories by Elizabeth Strout, Olive Kitteridge, co-produced by and starring McDormand. The role won her an Emmy Award and a SAG Award. With her Emmy win, she became only the 12th actress in history to achieve the Triple Crown of Acting, for competitive Oscar, Emmy and Tony Award wins in the acting categories.

You Might Remember Her As...
Marge Gunderson in Fargo, Glory Dodge in North Country, Elaine Miller in Almost Famous, one of the firemen in Mississippi Burning

Try Not to Remember Her From
Tranformers: Dark of the Moon (the movie WOULD have been improved if she was Marge Gunderson in that movie.  And John Turturro could be a time displaced Barton Fink).

Hey, Don't Forget to Check Out
I haven't seen it, but I hear Lone Star is good (I need to watch more John Sayles movies)

Coming Up

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is her next project, a drama (possibly a darkly comical one since it is by the guy who did Seven Psychopaths and In Bruges) about a woman who goes to war with the police following the death of her daughter.

Casting Idea

Has she ever played a powerful, fearsome business woman.  Seems like it's time.  Playing a powerful bad guy in general seems like it could be right in her wheelhouse.

Also, if they are making a Columbo movie...
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/UrgvBYZwS9k" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/UrgvBYZwS9k</a>

(Unfortunately, they cut off the great capper/reveal of that scene.  Also, this is a great showcase scene for William H. Macy)


Offline PsychoGoatee

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Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #28 on: August 17, 2016, 09:22:19 AM »
Frances McDormand is great in everything. Blood Simple is one of my favs, Burn After Reading is underrated (really funny), and every other Ceon bros flick. Looking at imdb she apparently has a small role in Aeon Flux, that was a really really good rifftrax.

And love for Nemoy as well.


Offline Darth Geek

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Re: Top 50 Actors and Actresses Countdown: List of Crap #95
« Reply #29 on: August 17, 2016, 10:51:28 AM »

And love for Nemoy as well.
Not enough love to spell his name correctly, apparently. But it's the thought that counts.