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Author Topic: SOLO: A Star Wars Story (2018)  (Read 6252 times)

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Offline RVR II

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« Last Edit: October 17, 2017, 10:28:10 AM by RVR II »



Offline Kete

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Re: Han Solo Spin-Off Movie (2018)
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2016, 06:52:42 PM »
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Offline RVR II

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Offline SJP

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Re: Young Han Solo Spin-Off Movie (2018)
« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2017, 12:28:48 PM »
I actually have no problem with this.  In fact, I am very much on board with this.  All it conjures up is old memories of Willow, and I don't think that's a bad thing at all.
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Offline Darth Geek

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Re: Young Han Solo Spin-Off Movie (2018)
« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2017, 01:06:53 PM »
Yeah, this isn't really a bad thing. It's a shame to see Lord and Miller leave the project, especially so late in the shooting schedule. But Ron Howard isn't a bad director. The biggest complaint I could give is that sometimes he's kind of a boring director. But that isn't the worst thing they could do. It's not like they hired Paul WS Anderson or something.



Offline The Lurker

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Re: Young Han Solo Spin-Off Movie (2018)
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2017, 01:11:48 PM »
Was hoping Joe Johnston would get picked.


Offline Darth Geek

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Re: Young Han Solo Spin-Off Movie (2018)
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2017, 01:26:49 PM »
Was hoping Joe Johnston would get picked.
That would be good. Or, hell, give it to Patty Jenkins!



Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: Young Han Solo Spin-Off Movie (2018)
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2017, 05:13:02 PM »
I have never seen a Ron Howard film and thought it was better than adequate. Often AWFUL.

(Caveat - I have never seen A Beautiful Mind, but I believe I've seen anything else some one would point to as a great Ron Howard film)
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Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: Young Han Solo Spin-Off Movie (2018)
« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2017, 06:18:43 PM »
I have never seen a Ron Howard film and thought it was better than adequate. Often AWFUL.

I'm not that quite harsh on him and I even think he might not be a bad choice for a Star Wars film... but Han Solo is an odd choice.  I feel like Han has an edge and Ron Howard is all soft edges.  Now if he narrated it, Arrested Development style...


Offline Edward J Grug III

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Re: Young Han Solo Spin-Off Movie (2018)
« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2017, 06:49:37 PM »
I have never seen a Ron Howard film and thought it was better than adequate. Often AWFUL.

I'm not that quite harsh on him and I even think he might not be a bad choice for a Star Wars film... but Han Solo is an odd choice.  I feel like Han has an edge and Ron Howard is all soft edges.  Now if he narrated it, Arrested Development style...

The other thing is it is extremely bizarre for such a high profile director to step into a mostly completed film.
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Offline SJP

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Re: Young Han Solo Spin-Off Movie (2018)
« Reply #11 on: June 23, 2017, 07:24:32 AM »
If they are calling in a director like that, it might not be as complete as they are letting on.

Either that, or the plot revolved around Han Solo pretending he was a high school student in order to bust an underground counterfeit Credit ring, and everyone busted out into "Everything is Awesome" for no reason whatsoever, and Disney was not happy with the direction the film was taking. ;) (I kid, I kid!)
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Offline Henry88

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Re: Young Han Solo Spin-Off Movie (2018)
« Reply #12 on: June 24, 2017, 12:26:26 PM »
The Upwards Failing of Colin Trevorrow (and Why It Matters)

WHAT THE LORD AND MILLER FIRING MEANS TO THE OVERALL WORLD OF LUCASFILM
Quote from: Neil Turitz
When the news broke the other day that Lucasfilm had fired the directing team of Phil Lord and Chris Miller off its Han Solo spinoff flick, a few things came to mind. First and foremost, there was the shock of a major project like this making such an enormous move, especially, ahem, five months into shooting.

After that, I took a moment to see what people were saying, and it came out that Lucasfilm chief Kathleen Kennedy wasn’t happy with the style and tone of the film that Lord and Miller were making, which led me to the second reaction, which was, “Well, jeez, who did she think she was hiring?” I mean, these are the guys behind Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, 21 Jump Street and its sequel, 22 Jump Street, and The LEGO Movie.

In other words, while the pair is immensely talented, these guys are not exactly Merchant and Ivory.

But after pondering that for a short spell, something else popped into my head, as I considered the history of Lucasfilm projects and one or two external incidents that directly relate to this particular cinematic universe. It was a dark thought, a sinister one, that I turned around a bit before I finally allowed myself to verbalize it, at which point I realized that, in even asking the question, I already had my answer.

Does Lucasfilm have itself a Director Problem?

After having given Warner Bros. so much guff for its issues with directors on the DC Comics movies, it would be unfair not to come to a similar conclusion here, simply because this is what the evidence suggests.

Most of the people reading this will be aware of the stürm und drang that surrounded last year’s Lucasfilm production of Rogue One, which essentially replaced director Gareth Edwards with Old Pro Tony Gilroy, as the experienced Gilroy came in with massive rewrites and directed large reshoots which, apparently (depending on who is talking) reshaped a good portion of the movie. That, in and of itself, should have been something of a red flag, but now this happens, and the central issue is inescapable.

And we haven’t even gotten into the catastrophe that is The Book of Henry, which is basically one of the worst reviewed films of the year, is going to be a major flop, and is a pretty large setback to its director, Colin Trevorrow. This is only important, mind you, because he is the man charged with writing and directing Episode IX of the Star Wars saga, due in theaters Memorial Day Weekend, 2019.

Apparently, the big difference between Lord and Miller and Edwards is that, when confronted with the idea of bringing in outside help to reshape things and oversee reshoots, Edwards said, “Sure, okay,” while Lord and Miller were not as eager to play along. This did not sit well with Kennedy, who has a very tight hold on all things Star Wars-related, and so she pulled the trigger on them, to the great and utter shock of Lord and Miller, who figured, naturally, that things would work themselves out.

There are a bunch of interesting factors here, not least of which is Kennedy’s desire to bring in hot, young, up-and-coming filmmakers, then refusing to allow them to do the things that drew her attention in the first place. For instance, with Lord and Miller, their style is much more loose and improvisational than what Kennedy is used to, as well as writer — and long time stalwart of the Lucasfilm Universe — Lawrence Kasdan, whose attitude is “You shoot the words that are on the page and don’t make them up as you go.” It seems he was at odds with Lord and Miller right from the start, so when they rejected out of hand the notion of dealing with someone else to come in and “help” them, it was time to let them go.

No matter, by the way, that some folks in the know were admirers of what the pair was doing, even while those same folks admitted it wasn’t a conventional Star Wars film, which was Kennedy’s whole point. Of course, others have said they were overmatched, out of their depth,  and should never have been hired in the first place, so I think the only thing on which we can agree here is that no one is agreeing on anything.

Either way, the two just weren’t a good fit, whereas Rian Johnson, currently in post-production on December’s The Last Jedi, understands the Universe perfectly and, word has it, has Kennedy and her team very happy with his cut of the film. Which means that, if you liked The Force Awakens and Rogue One, you’re going to love Jedi.

Trevorrow is another issue, in that, while the Book of Henry fiasco might make him more pliable for Kennedy, the legitimate question has to be asked about whether or not he is up to the task. While I quite like his first film, Safety Not Guaranteed, I can’t say the same about his second, Jurassic World, which might have made a ton of money (and got a lot of good reviews I never quite understood), but just isn’t a good movie. Don’t get me wrong, I’m rooting for him, but this has to be of some concern to those in charge.

There’s also an important fact here that can’t be ignored: none of this is new. Lucasfilm has always had a director problem. George Lucas directed four of the first six, and while the first one is great, it’s also, in hindsight, badly flawed, and the three prequels are awful. When he brought in his film school professor, and old pro helmer, Irvin Kershner to direct The Empire Strikes Back, he let Kershner run the show without any real supervision, then was furious when the film didn’t really turn out the way he envisioned, even though it is by far the best film of the series.

It’s for that reason, in fact, that journeyman Richard Marquand was hired to helm Return of the Jedi, so that Lucas could control every aspect of the production and thus not have to deal with his personal vision being corrupted, as it had been with Kershner. There are tons of stories out there of how ineffectual Marquand was on set, as if he was nothing more than a proxy for the boss. Which, essentially, he was.

Which is sort of where we are now. It has become exceedingly clear that anyone signing up for one of these gigs in the future will have to be well aware what they’re in for, and then make the decision about whether or not being a sort of puppet for his or her Lucasfilm Overlords is how they want to spend a couple years of their career. Yes, it’s an insane opportunity to make a Star Wars film, but there are going to be a fair number of auteurs who will pass on the offer, simply because, while they might want to play with someone else’s toys, they won’t want to be instructed by said toy owner exactly how they’re allowed to play with them.

Yesterday, Ron Howard stepped into the director’s chair, a seasoned pro whose best films are in the rearview mirror, but who will almost certainly come in and do a professional job of fulfilling Kennedy’s vision, in a way that first Edwards, and then Lord and Miller, weren’t.

Because let’s face it — at this point, what has become obvious is that the vision to be fulfilled, from here on out, is Kennedy’s, and woe be to any director who thinks differently.
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Offline guitarshark

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Re: Young Han Solo Spin-Off Movie (2018)
« Reply #13 on: June 24, 2017, 05:03:26 PM »
Han Solo is handsome.  He's not a pretty boy.  There's a difference.  I think Alden Ehrenreich is a mix between the two.




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2J31Shudtk

If he gets a broken nose then maybe.  He's got to lose the boyish voice too.  Harrison never had a boyish voice since he was a boy.  They should cast young men from cattle ranches or Australia.


Offline Henry88

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Re: Young Han Solo Spin-Off Movie (2018)
« Reply #14 on: June 26, 2017, 12:39:24 PM »
'Star Wars' Firing Reveals a Disturbance in the Franchise
New details emerge from the set of the troubled Han Solo movie (an editor fired, a last-minute acting coach hired) as insiders debate whether problems trace to directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller, or if the Disney and Lucasfilm series can accommodate divergent styles.
Quote from: Kim Masters
Matters had already reached a boiling point in mid-June when Phil Lord and Chris Miller, co-directors of the still-untitled young Han Solo movie, were in the cockpit of the Millennium Falcon but didn’t start shooting until 1 p.m. That day the two used only three different setups — that is, three variations on camera placement — as opposed to the 12 to 15 that Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy had expected, according to sources with knowledge of the situation. Not only was the going slow, but the few angles that had been shot did not provide a wealth of options to use in editing the movie.

This was hardly the first time Kennedy was unhappy with how the film was progressing. And as he looked at dailies from his home in Los Angeles, Lawrence Kasdan — screenwriter, executive producer and keeper of the Stars Wars flame — also was said to be displeased.

Meanwhile, Lord and Miller, the exceptionally successful team behind The Lego Movie and 21 Jump Street, were chafing, too, according to a source close to them. There were "deep fundamental philosophical differences" in filmmaking styles, this person says, and the directors felt they were being given "zero creative freedom." They also felt they were being asked to operate under "extreme scheduling constraints" and "were never given enough days for each scene from the very beginning."

Shortly after the shoot in the Millennium Falcon, on June 20, the world learned that Kennedy — with the backing of Disney studio chief Alan Horn — had taken the extraordinary step of firing Lord and Miller. Obviously, Kennedy knew this would set off a storm of publicity that no one wants or needs in any movie — especially one in the Star Wars universe, where every move is closely watched by a gigantic audience with a sense of ownership. It's rare and undesirable enough to fire any director. Firing established players like Lord and Miller, who have a fan base ready to give them the benefit of any doubt? That shocked Hollywood's most seasoned veterans.

Anxious to avoid an outright rupture, Kennedy is said to have made attempts first to support and eventually to supplant Lord and Miller to some degree, as happened with Gareth Edwards on the troubled Rogue One. In that case, screenwriter Tony Gilroy took on significant duties with the cooperation of Edwards; in this case, sources say, Kennedy attempted to cast Kasdan in that role. Unsurprisingly, Lord and Miller were less accommodating than Edwards, still a novice, had been. Lord and Miller declined to comment, as did Kennedy.

As soon as shooting got underway, insiders say, it started to become clear that Kennedy’s stated intention of hiring directors who would put their own spin on Star Wars movies had led to a mismatch. Some insiders say that while the talent of Lord and Miller is undeniable, nothing in their background prepared them for a movie of this size and scope. These sources say they relied too heavily on the improvisational style that served them so well in live-action comedy and animation but does not work on a set with hundreds of crewmembers waiting for direction.

“You have to make decisions much earlier than what they’re used to,” one of these sources say. “I don’t know if it’s because there were two of them but they were not decisive.” Production department heads began to complain. While the pair appeared to listen when told of festering problems, this person says their approach did not change.

But the source close to Lord and Miller acknowledges they have always worked in an improvisational style and not just to add comedic elements. "They collaborate closely with their actors and give them creative freedom that, in their experience, brings out the actors' best performances," this person says. "Lawrence Kasdan would not allow this and demanded that every line was said word for word. To appease him and the studio, Lord and Miller would do several takes exactly as written and then shoot additional takes."

Matters were coming to a head in May as the production moved from London to the Canary Islands. Lucasfilm replaced editor Chris Dickens (Macbeth) with Oscar-winner Pietro Scalia, a veteran of Ridley Scott films including Alien: Covenant and The Martian. And, not entirely satisfied with the performance that the directors were eliciting from Rules Don't Apply star Alden Ehrenreich, Lucasfilm decided to bring in an acting coach. (Hiring a coach is not unusual; hiring one that late in production is.) Lord and Miller suggested writer-director Maggie Kiley, who worked with them on 21 Jump Street.

When Kennedy felt that these measures did not get the production on track, she asked Kasdan to come to London. Kasdan is said also to have been unhappy with the limited shots and displeased that Lord and Miller were calling out lines for the actors to try from behind the monitor rather than sticking with the script that he had written in collaboration with his son. (Lord and Miller had input on the script before shooting began.) “As a writer, producer and part of Star Wars world, you get on a plane when that happens,” says a person with knowledge of the situation.

But Lord and Miller were not prepared to have Kasdan become a shadow director. With an impasse reached, Kennedy finally pulled the trigger. The next day, when the crew was told that Ron Howard would take over as director, sources say they broke into applause.

Stepping in to replace directors who have been fired is not something that many filmmakers would want to do. Probably Howard is one of the few who could and would — at least, in this particular set of circumstances. Insiders say he was concerned about how Lord and Miller would react and has been emailing with them; another source says the two have been “very supportive, very elegant.” Howard arrives in London on June 26 and shooting, which began in February and was supposed to be completed in July, will continue into the first week of September as Howard captures new material. Still, an insider says much of what Lord and Miller shot will be “very usable.”

How credit will be determined is up to the Directors Guild. What will happen next for Lord and Miller isn’t clear but they are in demand and have an open berth waiting for them to direct The Flash for Warner Bros., if they chose to take it. (They had left that film for the Han Solo movie but could return.)

While Kennedy declined to comment on the episode, just a year ago, THR did a Q-and-A with her that sheds light on her thinking. Kennedy discussed her belief that within major franchises, it is possible to “take artistic license and creative risks.” She added, “If all you're doing is playing it safe — trying to make the same movie over and over again — that's when the audiences say, 'Oh, this is just a moneymaking machine.’ But if it's genuinely in service to the art form, then the franchise concept is being used in a way that's exciting.”

But at the same time, Kennedy — speaking in the context of hiring young, relatively untested directors (as opposed to established filmmakers like Lord and Miller) — said these choices were “instinctual.” And she continued with a statement that seemed, perhaps presciently, to address what may have gone awry on the Han Solo movie: “One of the things I've come to realize since I've been in this position of keeping Star Wars going is that in addition to looking for somebody who can creatively have an impact, you're really looking for leadership skills. No one steps into these big movies without being able to genuinely lead the charge with hundreds of people and [handle] the relationship with the studio. That's a very difficult thing to do, and you don't know [a person can do] that until you get to spend time and watch somebody operate.”

There are some in the industry who see an emerging pattern suggesting that Kennedy’s appetite for creative license and risk-taking will have to be curbed. Josh Trank was dismissed from the second Star Wars stand-alone film before he even started based on problems with Fantastic Four; Edwards, who conceived of Rogue One as a dark war film, was shunted aside; and now this. For all the talk of hiring filmmakers with their own vision, observers say Kennedy and Disney may be learning that the franchise is defined by a particular set of parameters. “All of the films have been 'troubled,'" says a top executive at a rival studio. “J.J. [Abrams] was powerful enough to push back on an unrealistic start date [for the first movie] but that was a tug of war. The last one was reshot by Tony [Gilroy] for months and now this? This is a systemic problem.”

But an insider argues that Rian Johnson (Looper) shot Star Wars: The Last Jedi, set for release in December, seamlessly, proving that the right director can execute without major interference from Lucasfilm. The search for new and interesting filmmakers will continue and for many, perhaps, the siren call of Star Wars will be impossible to resist.

On the Han Solo movie, a high-level insider says Kennedy and Disney "were hoping for a meeting of the minds [with Lord and Miller] that never came." But if had Kennedy fired them earlier, another source says, “People would say, 'Why the hell didn’t you try to work it out?’ You’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t.”
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