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Author Topic: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!  (Read 16512 times)

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Online Johnny Unusual

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List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« on: June 28, 2016, 11:30:21 PM »
OK, we are finally ready to go.  This took a while and for that, I'm sorry.  I'll be telling you the rank, the first and last films in the series, the scores, what it's all about (note: the Alfie series didn't make it), high and low points and how if it were up to me, what the next entry in the series should be.  So lets get started.


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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2016, 11:30:47 PM »
#50
Hannibal Lecter

First Film: Manhunter -1986
Most Recent: Hannibal Rising -2007

16 Points, 1 List, #11 Linszoid

What Is It?
The Hannibal Lector films revolve around the brilliant and refined serial killer Hannibal Lector, who often the lead character needs the help of to catch other serial killers, due to his insight.  He is not to be mistaken as an ally, though; though he respects Clarice Starling, Hannibal isn’t above helping other killers (as in Manhunter/Red Dragon) and if freed, will continue to murder.  Hannibal is also known for his cannibalism, making intricate meals from his victims, and his refined nature, which belies his capability for brutality.  The character can act as both villain and antihero throughout the series.

High Point
Silence of the Lambs is regarded to be the best of the series.  That said, don’t overlook Manhunter, which is great despite the super-synthy soundtrack.

Low Point
Hannibal Rising is, but all accounts, pretty crappy.

Where could we go next? – I’d like to see one last Anthony Hopkins role to close out the series.  It’s not uncommon for the last (or at least a later) entry in a long running series with the same actor to deal with that character’s age and/or mortality but it would be interesting to see who a predator like Lector might deal with it and perhaps with an opponent (perhaps another killer or someone dedicated to stopping him) who may be outclassing (no pun intended but perhaps appropriate) him in every sense, with his final days closing in.  I bet you could do some great things with a Lecter death scene.


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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2016, 12:26:08 AM »
#49
Trois Couleurs

First Film: Blue -1993
Most Recent:  Red -1994

18 Points, 1 List, #8 Charles Foster Castle

What Is It?
The Three Colors trilogy (Polish: Trzy kolory, French: Trois couleurs) is the collective title of three films directed by Krzysztof Kieślowski, two made in French and one primarily in Polish: Three Colors: Blue (1993), Three Colors: White (1994), and Three Colors: Red (1994). All three were co-written by Kieślowski and Krzysztof Piesiewicz (with story consultants Agnieszka Holland and Sławomir Idziak) and have musical scores by Zbigniew Preisner.
Blue, white, and red are the colours of the French flag in left-to-right order, and the story of each film is loosely based on one of the three political ideals in the motto of the French Republic: liberty, equality, fraternity. As with the treatment of the Ten Commandments in The Decalogue, the illustration of these principles is often ambiguous and ironic. As Kieślowski noted in an interview with an Oxford University student newspaper, “The words [liberté, egalité, fraternité] are French because the money [to fund the films] is French. If the money had been of a different nationality we would have titled the films differently, or they might have had a different cultural connotation. But the films would probably have been the same.”
The trilogy is also interpreted respectively as an anti-tragedy, an anti-comedy, and an anti-romance.

High Point
I’ll admit, I haven’t seen them but Red did get some Oscar nods.

Low Point
None, I assume, but if there is, I’m sure Charles Foster Castle can elaborate.

Where could we go next? – Probably nowhere.  Krzysztof Kieślowski died in 1996.


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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2016, 06:48:32 AM »
#48A
Universal Monsters

First Film – The Hunchback of Notre Dame - 1923
Most Recent – The Leech Woman- 1960 (also, I guess, Dracula Untold for that attempt at a new shared universe, but let’s face it, we can ignore it.)

18 Points, 2 Lists, #15 Stethacantus

What Is It?
Universal Monsters or Universal Horror is a phrase used to describe the series of horror, suspense and science fiction films made by Universal Studios during the decades of the 1920s through the 1950s. The series began with The Hunchback of Notre Dame and The Phantom of the Opera, both silent films starring Lon Chaney. Universal continued with talkies including monster franchises Dracula, Frankenstein, The Mummy, The Invisible Man, The Wolf Man, and Creature from the Black Lagoon. The films often featured Bela Lugosi, Boris Karloff, and Lon Chaney, Jr.

In 1923, Universal produced the drama The Hunchback of Notre Dame, which starred Lon Chaney as Quasimodo. The production sets were built to evoke 15th-century Paris, including a re-creation of the Notre Dame de Paris cathedral.

Chaney starred as The Phantom in 1925's horror film, The Phantom of the Opera, based on the mystery novel by Gaston Leroux. The interior of the Opéra Garnier was recreated to scale which was used again in the 1943 remake with Claude Rains.

In 1931, Bela Lugosi starred in Universal's Dracula and Boris Karloff in Frankenstein. Actors Dwight Frye and Edward Van Sloan made several film appearances in this decade. Make-up artist Jack Pierce created several monsters' make-up starting in the 1930s.

The Mummy, starring Karloff, was produced in 1932. This was followed by a trilogy of films based on the tales of Edgar Allan Poe: Murders in the Rue Morgue (1932) starring Lugosi, The Black Cat (1934), and The Raven (1935), the latter two of which teamed Lugosi with Karloff. Universal began releasing sequels including Bride of Frankenstein (1935), Dracula's Daughter (1936) and sequels for The Invisible Man (1933).

The end of Universal’s first run of horror films came in 1936. The monster movies were dropped from the production schedule altogether and would not re-emerge for another three years. In the meantime, a theatre owner revived Dracula and Frankenstein as a double feature, prompting the studio to re-release the original movies. Son of Frankenstein (1939) starring Basil Rathbone, Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi was released.

During the 1940s, Universal released The Wolf Man (1941), with Lon Chaney, Jr. Chaney became the studio's leading monster movie actor in the 1940s, just as his father had been two decades earlier, supplanting the 1930s' Karloff and Lugosi by a wide margin in terms of the number of leading roles that he played.

 High Point
Frankenstein.  Also, Bride of Frankenstein, which many feel is the superior film but I think I might like the first better (though I’ll be happy to watch them back-to-back to see if I’ll change my mind).
.
Low Point
It would be easy to point to one of the ones that appeared on Mystery Science Theatre 3000, but I have a feeling there are ones that are just too dull and lifeless to appear on the show.

Where could we go next? – Well, recently, there is an effort to make a new shared universe series, which isn’t the worst idea but if Dracula Untold is any indication, if not going to be too good.  I would like to see a new series though.  You could replace one each Halloween, a nice PG-13 rated horror film that is scary but is also great for all audiences. I think the Others might be a good template for tone, save that The Others was a ghost story, not a monster story.  Oh, and Guillermo del Toro could be there, at least as a producer or something.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2016, 10:52:48 PM by Johnny Unusual »


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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2016, 07:18:22 AM »
 
#48B
The Fast and the Furious

First Film – The fast and the Furious - 2001
Most Recent – Furious 7 - 2015

18 Points, 2 Lists, #15 Psycho Goatee

What Is It?
The Fast and the Furious (also known as Fast & Furious) is an American franchise including a series of action films, which center around illegal street racing and heists, and various other media portraying the characters and situations from the films. Distributed by Universal Pictures, the series was established with the 2001 film titled The Fast and the Furious; followed by sixsequels, two short films that tie into the series, and as of May 2015, it has become Universal's biggest franchise of all time.

The series largely focuses on Dominic Toretto and his “family” of street racing super-thieves.  In the first film Dom ends up facing off against FBI Agent Bryan O’Conner who ends up becoming a friend and a partner in crime over the course of the series.  Though the series started off modestly, the later installments are well regarded for their incredible stunts and set pieces.

 High Point
Basically this is the rare franchise where each installment starting with Fast & Furious (the fourth film is a marked improvement over the previous, so I’d go with Furious 7.
.
Low Point
Probably the rather forgettable 2 Fast 2 Furious and Tokyo Drift, both largely Vin Diesel-free.

Where could we go next? – Hard to say.  I don’t really have any suggestions since it seems it is a series on the right track.  And with Helen Mirren as the next villain, I’m struggling to think of another great villain.  Maybe Donald Sutherland, but I recommend him for everything.


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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2016, 08:48:08 AM »
#47A
The Three Mothers

First Film – Suspiria - 1977
Most Recent – The Mother of Tears - 2007

19 Points, 1 List, #7 Psycho Goatee

What Is It?
The Three Mothers (Le Tre madri in Italian) is a trilogy of supernatural horror films by Italian film director Dario Argento. It consists of Suspiria, Inferno and The Mother of Tears. Each film deals with one of the titular "Mothers", a triumvirate of ancient and evil witches whose powerful magic allows them to manipulate world events on a global scale.
During the 2007 Toronto International Film Festival, Argento stated he had not ruled out the possibility of shooting a fourth film dealing with the Three Mothers. His daughter Asia "joked" that one day there might be a prequel.
The idea of "Three Mothers" comes from "Levana and Our Ladies of Sorrow", a section of Thomas de Quincey's Suspiria de Profundis. The piece asserts that just as there are three Fates and Graces, there are also three Sorrows. They include Mater Lachrymarum (Our Lady of Tears), Mater Suspiriorum (Our Lady of Sighs), and Mater Tenebrarum (Our Lady of Darkness). The attribute of each woman (tears, sighs, shadows/darkness) is a direct translation of her name from Latin. (Mater being the Latin word for "mother".)

 High Point
By a wide margin, Suspiria, which is a beautiful, crazy film with one of the great horror first acts around.

Low Point
The Mother of Tears got fairly bad reviews, as does pretty much any Dario Argento movie in the last 20 years.

Where could we go next? – I don’t really want to see another one.  Argento isn’t the man he used to be and it really is his deal.  There have been talks of a remake of Suspiria but no, thank you.  However, I would like to see a pastiche of those films that carry the same gorgeous, bloody aesthetic.


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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2016, 06:32:48 PM »
#47B
Abbott and Costello

First Film – One Night in the Tropics - 1940
Most Recent – The World of Abbott and Costello- 1965

19 Points, 1 List, #7 Fred Garvin

What Is It?
William "Bud" Abbott and Lou Costello were an American comedy duo whose work in vaudeville and on stage, radio, film andtelevision made them the most popular comedy team during the 1940s and early 1950s. Their patter routine "Who's on First?" is one of the best-known comedy routines of all time and set the framework for many of their best-known comedy bits.

The team's first known radio appearance was on The Kate Smith Hour in February 1938. The similarities between their voices made it difficult for radio listeners (as opposed to stage audiences) to tell them apart during their rapid-fire repartee. To solve the problem, Costello began affecting a high-pitched, childish voice. "Who's on First?" was first performed for a national radio audience the following month.  They performed on the program as regulars for two years, while also landing roles in a Broadway revue, The Streets of Paris, in 1939.
In 1940, Universal Studios signed them for the film One Night in the Tropics. Cast in supporting roles, they stole the show with several classic routines, including the "Who's on First?" routine. The same year they were a summer replacement on radio for Fred Allen. Two years later, they had their own NBC show. Universal then signed them to a long-term contract, and their second film, Buck Privates, in 1944 made them box-office stars and saved Universal from imminent bankruptcy.

In most of their films, the plot consisted of a framework for the two comics to reintroduce comedy routines they first performed on stage. Universal also added glitzy production numbers to capitalize on the popular musical-comedy film genre of the day, which featured such acts as Ted Lewis and his Orchestra, Ella Fitzgerald, Martha Raye, The Merry Macs, and Dick Foran, singing "I'll Remember April" in Ride 'Em Cowboy.

The most popular singing act in their films was that of The Andrews Sisters, and several of their films featured some of the Andrews Sisters' most popular hits of World War Two, the Oscar-nominated "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy", as well as "I'll Be With You In Apple Blossom Time", both from Buck Privates. Bud & Lou's sequel, In The Navy, featured crooner Dick Powell along with the Andrews Sisters, and initially out-grossed Buck Privates, with the management at Loew's Criterion in Manhattan keeping theater doors open until 5 a.m. to oblige over 49,000 attendees during the film's first week premiere. Hold That Ghost (which had been completed before production of In the Navy began) when first shown to preview audiences, received complaints from film-goers on feedback cards that they were disappointed not to see The Andrews Sisters, so the trio was hired and musical numbers were added to a re-edited version as a prologue and epilogue. The singing sisters became good friends with Costello during this period, enjoying many barbecues and film showings with their parents at Lou's home throughout the early 1940s. In 1945, the two acts traded guest appearances on each other's top-rated radio show.

Bud and Lou made 36 films together between 1940 and 1956. They were among the most popular and highest-paid entertainers in the world during World War II. Other film successes included Keep 'Em Flying, Who Done It?, Pardon My Sarong, The Time of Their Lives, Buck Privates Come Home, Abbott and Costello Meet the Invisible Man, andAbbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein. In the latter two films, Bela Lugosi reprised his famous role as Dracula for the final time, with Lon Chaney Jr. reprising his role as the Wolf Man. The film ended with a voice cameo by Vincent Price as the Invisible Man.

On December 8, 1941, a day after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Abbott and Costello had their prints set in concrete at what was then "Grauman's Chinese Theatre". In 1942, they were the top box office draw with four films, earning a total of $10 million, and remained a top ten box office attraction until 1952.

High Point
Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein is not only a high point for the duo, but also the Universal Monsters.

Low Point
I really haven’t seen any of them but the last film is a “compilation film”. Which is basically a clip show for theatres, so I’m gonna say that.

Where could we go next? – Nowhere.  These are people who are dead and though they play characters, they aren’t the kind where someone else can take up the mantle.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2016, 09:21:51 PM by Johnny Unusual »


Offline PsychoGoatee

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #7 on: June 29, 2016, 08:30:08 PM »
Low Point
The Mother of Tears got fairly bad reviews, as does pretty much any Dario Argento movie in the last 20 years.

It's a good time, I even saw it in a theater. Udo Kier is back too, it's definitely cheesy, not on par with the sublime early Argento, but I consider it a really entertaining movie. Definitely very funny, sometimes unintentional I'm sure, but it sits proudly on my DVD shelf. Speaking of funny and giallo, this recent movie The Editor is an awesome parody/homage of classic giallo, really really funny.

Thanks for putting these posts together!
« Last Edit: June 29, 2016, 08:32:17 PM by PsychoGoatee »


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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #8 on: June 29, 2016, 08:36:27 PM »
#46A
Police Academy

First Film – Police Academy - 1984
Most Recent –  Police Academy: Mission to Moscow- 1994

20 Points, 1 List, #6 Cole Stratton

What Is It?
Police Academy is a series of American comedy films, the first six of which were made in the 1980s. The seventh and to date last installment, Mission to Moscow, was released in 1994. The series opened with Police Academy (1984) which started with the premise that a new mayor had announced a policy requiring the police department to accept all willing recruits. The movie followed a group of misfit recruits in their attempts to prove themselves capable of being police officers, and succeeding both in spite of and because of their eccentricities. The main character, Carey Mahoney (Steve Guttenberg), was a repeat offender who was forced to join the police academy as punishment.

In general, all of the movies and television shows depended on low-brow humor, usually based on simple characterizations and physical comedy. As with many similar movies, the theme was a group of underdogs struggling to prove themselves while various stereotyped authority figures tried to suppress them. The sequels have not been well received by critics over the years. The first film grossed $81.2 million in North America, with the following films earning $150 million in total.  Parallels are often drawn between Police Academy and the British Carry On franchise for their common reliance on a largely constant ensemble cast throughout the various films, the two series' frequent use of low brow humor, sexual innuendo and physical comedy.

High Point
Maybe the first one or the one where Bobcat Goldthwait joins the cast?

Low Point
Mission to Moscow is particularly and infamously bad in a series that was generally panned by critics.

Where could we go next? – I think the franchise could be reborn pretty well in an era of bizarre, ironic anti-comedy.  I’m not saying they should go all Tim and Eric but taking style cues from the often-intentionally cheesy-but-in-an-ironic way Comedy Bang Bang TV series.  In particular, I’d like to see a Neil Campbell script for a new one.


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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #9 on: June 29, 2016, 08:38:00 PM »
Thanks for putting these posts together!

Thanks, man.


Offline Darth Geek

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #10 on: June 29, 2016, 08:38:53 PM »
Good list so far. I never would have thought of combining all of the Universal Horror Monster movies together, but it makes sense.



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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #11 on: June 29, 2016, 09:38:10 PM »
#46B
Ernest P. Worrell

First Film – Ernest Goes to Camp - 1987
Most Recent –  Ernest in the Army  - 1998

20 Points, 1 List, #6 Pak-Man

What Is It?
Ernest P. Worrell is a fictional character portrayed by American actor Jim Varney in a series of television commercials, and later in a television series (Hey Vern, It's Ernest!) as well as a series of feature films. Ernest was created by the Nashville advertising agency Carden and Cherry and was used in various local television ad campaigns. The only national products he promoted were The Coca-Cola Company's sodas, Chex, and Taco John's. The first Ernest commercial, filmed in 1980, advertised an appearance by the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders at Beech Bend Park, an amusement park near Bowling Green, Kentucky. The format of the commercials seldom varied.
The rubber-faced Ernest, almost always dressed in a denim vest and baseball cap, appeared at the door of an unseen and unheard but seemingly unwilling neighbor named Vern. The spots were structured in a way to allow the viewer to be "Vern", as Varney looked directly in the camera whenever Vern was addressed. Ernest's seemingly pointless conversations with Vern – which were actually a monologue due to Vern never responding – inevitably rambled around to a favorable description of the sponsor's product, followed by his signature close, "KnowhutImean?" While Vern is never shown to ever say anything, it is implied that he finds Ernest to be an unwelcome pest due to him trying to slam his door in Ernest's face on a few occasions. Vern also shakes his head "No" whenever Ernest invites him to do something. Ernest, despite having good intentions, is utterly oblivious to Vern's apparent distress regarding him and always regards Vern as his closest buddy and confidant.
 A television series, Hey Vern, It's Ernest!, and a series of theatrically released motion pictures followed.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_P._Worrell - cite_note-11 Although the television series won Varney a Daytime Emmy Award for his performance, the movies were not critically well-received; however, the latter were produced on very low budgets and were quite profitable. In the films, Ernest is apparently somewhat aware of his extreme resistance to harm, as in Ernest Rides Again, he seemed barely fazed by nails bending after being fired at his skull, remarking 'Good thing they hit the hard end', he also commented that he would be dead "If I wasn't this close to being an actual cartoon."  When the series stopped being profitable in theatres, the series went direct to video.  The series ended with actor Jim Varney’s death.

High Point
Ernest Goes to Camp, probably.

Low Point
The description Ernest in the Army sounds particularly ill-considered, certainly in this day in age where people don’t really talk about joining the army “to drive big vehicles.”

Where could we go next? – This is Varney’s character and with his passing, we can just put him to rest.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2016, 10:49:59 PM by Johnny Unusual »


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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #12 on: June 29, 2016, 10:49:12 PM »
#46C
The Toxic Avenger

First Film – The Toxic Avenger - 1984
Most Recent –  Citizen Toxie: The Toxic Avenger IV  - 2000

20 Points, 1 List, #6 Psycho Goatee

What Is It?
The Toxic Avenger is a 1984 American superhero horror comedy film directed by Michael Herz and Lloyd Kaufman (credited as Samuel Weil) and written by Kaufman and Joe Ritter. The film was released by Troma Entertainment, known for producing low budget B-movies with campy concepts and gruesome violence. Virtually ignored upon its first release, The Toxic Avenger caught on with filmgoers after a long and successful midnight movie engagement at the famed Bleecker Street Cinemas in New York City in late 1985. It now is regarded as a cult classic.
The film has generated three film sequels, a stage musical production and a children's TV cartoon. Two less successful sequels, The Toxic Avenger Part II and The Toxic Avenger Part III: The Last Temptation of Toxie, were filmed as one. Director Lloyd Kaufman realized that he had shot far too much footage for one film and re-edited it into two. A third independent sequel was also released, titled Citizen Toxie: The Toxic Avenger IV

High Point
The first one is definitely the most popular in the series.

Low Point
Part 2 is infamously pretty bad, garnering a 0% on Rotten Tomatoes.

Where could we go next? – For a while Steve Pink (Hot Tub Time Machine) has been looking at making a PG-13 version in the vein of Toxic Crusaders cartoon from the early 90’s, but I think this is a bad idea.  I also am not really a big Lloyd Kaufman fan, though I respect his studio and all the talent that came out of it (James Gunn, Trey Parker and Matt Stone).  I think they should look for a similar talent from within the company to make it.  As for style, I think it can be a very gross, black comedy in the vein of a lot of Adult Swim programming (Tim and Eric, Jon Glaser) but also with a satire about our attitude towards the environment.


Offline stethacantus

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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #13 on: June 29, 2016, 10:52:36 PM »
#48A
Universal Monsters

#47B
Abbott and Costello
Generally, the classic Universal monster series is suppose to have begun with Dracula ( 1931 ) and ended with Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein ( 1948 ), although A&C went on to meet other classic monsters in later films, Abbott & Costello Meet Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde ( 1953 ), Abbott & Costello Meet The Invisible Man ( 1951 ),  and Abbott & Costello Meet The Mummy ( 1955 ) which was also the very last A&C film for Universal Studios. It would be followed a year later by an independent production called Dance With Me, Henry ( 1956 ) which Universal did not produce, but did obtain the theatrical distribution rights. Dance With Me Henry was the last film Bud Abbott and Lou Costello both starred in together. The World of Abbott & Costello (  1965 ) was a compilation film made six years after Lou Costello's death. I am not exactly sure if it counts as the last in their series. But then again, I am not sure if the films they made for MGM or independent productions count as part of their film series. That final decision would be up to the moderator of this list. As for A&C's worst, no musical comedy gets much worse than Jack and the Beanstalk ( 1952 ).  Because A&C does cross over into Universal's classic movie monster franchise, for a while I debated if both counted as a combined franchise. Usually the Universal silent horror films are not counted as part of the classic run of monster movies. And everything made beyond the Creeper films are considered a different generation of Universal monster movies. My criteria was just to count the original combined universe which began with Frankenstein Meets The Wolf Man in 1943 and later included films with Dracula, meaning all three independent franchises were now combined.

Universal never officially released their horror films as a series, so every film buff has his/her own opinion as to which films should be included or not included. Some do include the films from the 50s because those were the years the Creature from the Black Lagoon series was released. Some even include Jaws ( 1975 ) as part of the Universal movie monster franchise. As for what counts as the final movie in the combined monster universe, the A&C movies are usually cited. But others have pointed out that the television series The Munsters is actually the classic movie monsters as an urban family, so therefore Munsters, Go Home! ( 1966 ) should be counted as the final film. And then again in 1987 Tri-Star paid Universal a small fortune for the rights to relaunch their classic monsters. The first and last film Tri-Star made was called The Monster Squad ( 1987 ) which not only could be called the last movie in the Universal classic monster movie series, but the worst as well. But that is only if you count monster movies produced outside of Universal. 


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Re: List of Crap: Top 50 Film Series Countdown!
« Reply #14 on: June 29, 2016, 11:02:12 PM »
That's it for tonight!  More tomorrow and the last of our ties.