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Author Topic: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts  (Read 17264 times)

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Online Pak-Man

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #90 on: September 20, 2014, 12:10:20 AM »
#9–Rock Band

(43 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 – ColeStratton
Release Date:  November 20, 2007
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Rock Band is a music video game developed by Harmonix, published by MTV Games and Electronic Arts. It is the first title in the Rock Band series. The Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 versions were released in the North America on November 20, 2007.
 
Rock Band allows up to four players to simulate the performance of popular rock music songs by playing with controllers modeled after musical instruments. Players can play the lead guitar, bass guitar, and drums parts to songs with "instrument controllers", as well as sing through a USB microphone. Players are scored on their ability to match scrolling musical "notes" while playing instruments, or by their ability to match the singer's pitch on vocals. Players with the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 versions can interact through both online and offline multiplayer capabilities. In addition to the 58 core songs included on the game disc, over 2,000 downloadable songs were released for the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 versions.
 
At launch, the game software was made available in a bundle that packaged it together with the instrument peripherals, as well as for purchase separately. Individual instrument peripherals were released at a later date. The game has received widespread critical acclaim, with sales of four million units and global revenues of $600 million. Players have made over 100 million downloadable song purchases since Rock Band's release.

Reusing many gameplay elements from the Guitar Hero series, Rock Band players use peripherals modeled after musical instruments to simulate the performance of rock music. Players use these instruments by playing scrolling musical "notes" on-screen in time with the music. Rock Band expands upon the Guitar Hero series, in that it offers gameplay for drums and vocals, in addition to lead and bass guitar.
 
Rock Band's gameplay and on-screen interface uses a combination of elements from Guitar Hero and Karaoke Revolution. Rock Band has up to three tracks of vertically scrolling colored music notes, one section each for lead guitar, drums, and bass. The colored notes on-screen correspond to buttons on the guitar and drum peripherals. For lead and bass guitar, players play their notes by holding down colored fret buttons on the guitar peripheral and pushing the controller's strum bar; for drums, players must strike the matching colored drumhead, or step on the pedal to simulate playing bass drum notes. Along the top of the screen is the vocals display, which scrolls horizontally, similar to Karaoke Revolution. The lyrics display beneath green bars, which represent the pitch of the individual vocal elements. When singing vocals, the player must sing in relative pitch to the original vocals. A pitch indicator displays the singer's accuracy relative to the original pitch. The remainder of the screen is used to display the band's virtual characters as they perform in concert.

Pak's Thoughts – Never got into Rock Band. While most of the world was heroically playing guitar or starting rock bands, I was jamming out to Samba De Amigo and Dance Dance Revolution. To each their own, I suppose.


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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #91 on: September 20, 2014, 12:10:42 AM »
#8–Silent Hill 2

(46 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 – Relaxing Dragon
Don't worry..I'm not crazy. At least I don't think so.
Release Date:  September 24, 2001
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Silent Hill 2 is a survival horror video game published by Konami for the PlayStation 2 and developed by Team Silent, a production group within Konami Computer Entertainment Tokyo. The game was released in September 2001 as the second installment in the Silent Hill series
 
While set in the series' eponymous fictional American town, Silent Hill 2 is not a direct sequel to the first Silent Hill game. Instead, it centers on James Sunderland, who enters the town after receiving a letter written by his deceased wife, saying she is waiting for him in their "special place" in Silent Hill. Joined by Maria, who strongly resembles her, he searches for her and discovers the truth about her death. Additional material in re-releases and ports included Born from a Wish, a sub-scenario which focuses on Maria before she and James meet.
 
Silent Hill 2 uses a third-person view and gameplay places a greater emphasis on finding items and solving riddles than combat. Psychological aspects such as the gradual disappearance of Mary's letter were added to the game. More humanoid than their counterparts in the preceding game, some of the monsters were designed as a reflection of James' subconscious. References to real world history, films and literary works can also be found in the game.
 
Silent Hill 2 was positively received by the audience and critics. Within the month of its release in North America, Japan, and Europe, over one million copies were sold, with the greatest sales in North America. English-language critics praised the atmosphere, graphics, story and monster designs of Silent Hill 2, but criticized the controls as difficult to use.
 
Since its release Silent Hill 2 appeared on several critics' top lists for its story and use of metaphors, psychological horror and taboo topics as well as its soundtrack/sound design. It has since topped several critics lists for the greatest horror game of all-time.

Pak's Thoughts – Good ol’ fashioned nightmare fuel! I haven’t played very much of this one, but my brother was way into it. Once, in the middle of the night, I got a knock on my door. It was my brother, at the time legally an adult, asking me if I would walk him to the kitchen.  That’s some powerful creepy, right there.


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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #92 on: September 20, 2014, 12:11:04 AM »
#7–Half Life 2

(56 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #5 – CJones
Rise and shine, Mister Freeman, rise and … shine.
Release Date:  November 16, 2004
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Half-Life 2, the sequel to Half-Life, is a first-person shooter video game and part of the Half-Life series. Developed by Valve Corporation, it was initially released on November 16, 2004, following a protracted five-year, $40 million development cycle, during which a substantial part of the project was leaked and distributed on the Internet.
 
The game was developed alongside Valve's Steam software. It introduced the Source game engine and, because of Steam, was the first single-player video game to require online product activation.
 
Like its predecessor, Half-Life 2 is a single-player first-person shooter broken into several chapters, permanently casting the player as the protagonist Gordon Freeman. The sequel has nearly the same mechanics as Half-Life, including health-and-weapon systems and periodic physics puzzles, except with the newer Source Engine and improved graphics. The player also starts without items, slowly building up an arsenal over the course of the game. Despite the game's mainly linear nature, much effort was put into making exploration rewarding and interesting; many optional areas can be missed or avoided.
 
A diverse set of enemies are present, which usually require being approached with different tactics: some coordinate in groups to out-maneuver or out-position the player; others, like the Manhack, fly directly at the player through small openings and tight corridors; some use predictable but powerful attacks, while others hide before swiftly attacking the player. Gordon can kill most enemies with his weapons, or make use of indirect means, exploiting environmental hazards such as explosive pressurized canisters, gas fires or improvised traps. At one point in the game, Gordon can be joined by up to four armed Resistance soldiers, and can send his team further from him or call them back; however, they can still die easily due to lack of damage protection. Squad members are indicated on the HUD (squad member icons with a cross sign are field medics).

Pak's Thoughts – Half Life was an excellent shooter, but I never quite beat it and so I never took the leap to Half Life 2. Everything I’ve seen and the popularity of certain characters way back when I was doing the Top 50 Video Game Characters list makes me excited to try it, but I just really need to get through part 1 first…


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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #93 on: September 20, 2014, 12:12:00 AM »
#6–Shadow of the Colossus

(64 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – CJones
Raise thy sword by the light, and head to the place where the sword's light gathers.
Release Date:  October 18, 2005
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Shadow of the Colossus is an action-adventure game published by Sony Computer Entertainment (SCEI) for the PlayStation 2. The game was released in North America and Japan in October 2005 and PAL territories in February 2006. It was directed by Fumito Ueda and developed at SCEI's International Production Studio 1, also known as Team Ico; the same development team responsible for the cult hit Ico. Shadow of the Colossus is considered a spiritual successor to Ico. Along with Ico, Shadow of the Colossus was re-released in The Ico & Shadow of the Colossus Collection (ICO & Shadow of the Colossus Classics HD in the PAL region) for the PlayStation 3 in September 2011; it features high-definition (HD) graphics, content previously missing from the North American version, PlayStation Network Trophies, and 3D support. The HD version was released separately in Japan.
 
The game's storyline focuses on a young man named Wander who enters a forbidden land. Wander must travel across a vast expanse on horseback and defeat sixteen massive beings, known simply as colossi, in order to restore the life of a girl named Mono. The game is unusual within the action-adventure genre in that there are no towns or dungeons to explore, no characters with which to interact, and no enemies to defeat other than the colossi. Shadow of the Colossus has been described as a puzzle game, as each colossus' weakness must be identified and exploited before it can be defeated.
 
Cited as an influential title in the video game industry, Shadow of the Colossus is often regarded as an important example of video game art due to its minimalist landscape designs, immersive gameplay and emotional journey. It received wide critical acclaim by the media and was met with strong sales compared to Ico, due in part to a larger marketing campaign. The soundtrack was also widely praised. The game won several awards for its audio, design, and overall quality. Shadow of the Colossus is also referenced numerous times in debates regarding the art quality and emotional perspectives of video games.

Progression through Shadow of the Colossus occurs in cycles. Beginning at a central point in an expansive landscape, the player seeks out and defeats a colossus, and is then returned to the central point to repeat the process. To find each colossus, Wander may raise his sword while in a sunlit area to reflect beams of light, which will converge when the sword is pointed in the right direction of the next encounter. The journey to a colossus is seldom a straightforward matter: stretches of varied terrain often require that a detour be taken along the way. Most colossi are located in remote areas, such as atop cliffs or within ancient structures.

Once a colossus is found, the player must discover its weaknesses to defeat it. Each colossus dwells in a unique lair, and many colossi cannot be defeated without making use of the surrounding environment. Every colossus has at least one weak point, indicated by a glowing sigil that can be illuminated and identified by the sword's reflected light. Each colossus has areas covered with fur or protruding ledges, which Wander may use to grip and scale the colossus while it thrashes about in an attempt to dislodge him. While scaling a colossus, the player must act quickly, as Wander has a limited stamina gauge that decreases while he hangs onto the creature.

Pak's Thoughts – A beautiful game that abandons pretense and says, “We know why you’re here. You want boss fights. Get to it! Isolating the challenge to conquering the colossi means that every boss fight you have is well thought out and uniquely challenging.

And we’re down to the Top 5. I can say without hyperbole that the Top 5 consists of 5 of the greatest games ever made. Which ones? Read on!


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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #94 on: September 20, 2014, 12:12:40 AM »
#5–Super Smash Bros. Melee

(67 Points) 4 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #3 – Quantum Vagina
Show me your moves!
Release Date:  November 21, 2001
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Super Smash Bros. Melee is a crossover fighting game released for the Nintendo GameCube shortly after its launch in 2001 (2002 in the PAL region). It is the second game in the Super Smash Bros. series, following the first game released for Nintendo 64 in 1999. HAL Laboratory developed the game, with Masahiro Sakurai as head of production.
 
The game is centered on characters from Nintendo's video gaming franchises such as Mario, The Legend of Zelda, and Pokémon. The stages and gameplay modes make references to, or take their designs from, popular games released by Nintendo. Melee's gameplay system offers an unorthodox approach to the "fighter" genre as percentage counters measure the level of damage received, rather than the health bar traditionally seen in most fighting games. It builds on the first game's broad appeal by adding new features related to gameplay and playable characters. Following the popularity of its multiplayer gameplay, Melee has been featured in several multiplayer gaming tournaments.

Like its predecessor, Super Smash Bros. Melee differs from traditional fighting games in that inflicting the most damage does not guarantee victory. Instead, opposing players must force their opponents beyond the boundaries of the stage. Most attacks inflict damage and can, if enough damage is dealt, knock back the enemy. Each character's health is measured by a meter that represents the damage received as a percentage. The higher the percentage value, the farther the player gets knocked back, and the easier they are to knock off the stage. Unlike other games of the same genre, in which moves are entered by button-input combinations, most moves in Super Smash Bros. Melee can be accessed via one-button presses and a joystick direction.
 
During battles, items related to Nintendo games or merchandise fall onto the game field. These items have purposes ranging from inflicting damage on the opponent to restoring health to the player. Additionally, most stages have a theme relating to a Nintendo franchise or a specific Nintendo game and are interactive to the player. Although the stages are rendered in three dimensions, players can only move on a two-dimensional plane. Not all stages are available immediately; some stages must be "unlocked" by achieving particular requirements.

Pak's Thoughts – Don’t get me wrong. I love this game and I’ve devoted a hefty portion of my life to it, but how did this do so much better then Brawl? Brawl was an improvement in every way. It was this game, but more. That said, it’s good to see the top 5 starting with such an awesome title, and it keeps getting better from here..


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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #95 on: September 20, 2014, 12:13:18 AM »
#4–BioShock

(75 Points) 4 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 – Relaxing Dragon
I am Andrew Ryan, and I'm here to ask you a question. Is a man not entitled to the sweat of his brow? "No," says the man in Washington, "it belongs to the poor." "No," says the man in the Vatican, "it belongs to God." "No," says the man in Moscow, "it belongs to everyone." I rejected those answers; instead, I chose something different. I chose the impossible. I chose... Rapture. A city where the artist would not fear the censor; where the scientist would not be bound by petty morality; where the great would not be constrained by the small! And with the sweat of your brow, Rapture can become your city as well.
Release Date:  August 21, 2007
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
BioShock is a biopunk first-person shooter video game with horror themes developed by 2K Boston (later Irrational Games), and published by 2K Games. The game was released for Microsoft Windows and Xbox 360 platforms in August 2007. The game's concept was developed by Irrational's creative lead, Ken Levine, and was based on the ideas of Objectivism as highlighted by Ayn Rand, while incorporating influences from other authors such as George Orwell. The game is considered a spiritual successor to the System Shock series, which many of Irrational's team including Levine had worked on previously.
 
BioShock is set in 1960, in which the player guides the protagonist, Jack, after his airplane crashes in the ocean near the bathysphere terminus that leads to the underwater city of Rapture. Built by the business magnate Andrew Ryan, the city was intended to be an isolated utopia, but the discovery of ADAM, a plasmid which grants superhuman powers, initiated the city's turbulent decline. Jack tries to find a way to escape, fighting through hordes of ADAM-obsessed enemies such as the deadly Big Daddies, while engaging with the few sane humans that remain and eventually learning of Rapture's past. The player, as Jack, is able to defeat foes in a number of ways by using weapons, utilizing plasmids that give unique powers and by turning Rapture's own defenses against them. BioShock includes elements of role-playing games, giving the player different approaches in engaging enemies such as by stealth, as well as moral choices of saving or killing characters.

BioShock is a first-person shooter with role-playing game customization and stealth elements, and is similar to System Shock 2. The player takes the role of Jack as he is guided through Rapture towards various objectives. The player collects various weapons and plasmids as they work their way through enemy forces. The player can switch between one active weapon and one active plasmid at any time, allowing them to find combination attacks that can be effective against certain enemies, such as first shocking a Splicer then striking them down with a wrench. Weapons are limited by ammunition that the player collects; many weapons have secondary ammo types that can be used instead for additional benefits, such as bullets that inflict fire damage. Plasmid use consume a serum called EVE which can be restored using EVE syringes collected by the player. The player has a health meter that decreases when they take damage. The player can restore their health with medical packs found throughout Rapture. If the player's health reduces to zero, they will be regenerated at the last Vita-Chamber that they passed with limited amounts of health and EVE. A patch for the game disables these Vita-Chambers, requiring players to restart a saved game if the character dies.

Pak's Thoughts – I fell in love with this game as soon as I played the intro. What I love about that intro is that it never takes control away from the player. No cut scenes. It doesn’t lock your feet to the ground or change the camera to an external one. If the game wants you to watch a movie, it ensures that the movie is the only really interesting thing to be watching at the time. You can stare at the bathysphere ceiling if you want to, but why would you? Because it never takes that control from you, you stay emerged in the game and it just never stops….


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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #96 on: September 20, 2014, 12:13:50 AM »
#3– Sid Meier's Civilization IV

(77 Points) 4 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #2 – Compound
Just one more turn…
Release Date:  October 25, 2005
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Sid Meier's Civilization IV is a turn-based strategy computer game and the fourth installment of the Civilization series. It was developed by lead designer Soren Johnson under the direction of Sid Meier and his video game development studio Firaxis Games, and then first released in North America, Europe, and Australia, between October 25 and November 4 of 2005.
 
Civilization IV uses the 4X empire-building model for turn-based strategy gameplay, in which the player's main objective is to construct a civilization from limited initial resources. Most standard full-length games start the player with a settler unit and/or a city unit in the year 4000 BC. As with other games in the series, there are by default five objectives the player can pursue in order to finish the game: conquering other civilizations, controlling a supermajority of the game world's land and population, building and sending the first sleeper ship to the Alpha Centauri star system, increasing the "Culture ratings" of at least three different cities to "legendary" levels, or winning a "World Leader" popularity contest by the United Nations. However, if the time limit for the game is reached and none of the previous goals has been fulfilled by any players including game AI players, the civilization with the highest total game score is declared winner. A large departure from earlier Civilization games is a new graphics engine created from scratch, based on the Gamebryo engine by Numerical Design Limited (NDL).
 
The game has generally received nearly universal acclaim and was hailed as an example product of one of the leading video game producers in the turn-based strategy genre. Civilization IV has sold 3 million copies and won multiple awards, including several Game of the Year awards. In addition to this, Firaxis Games has also released two other major expansions, Civilization IV: Warlords and Civilization IV: Beyond the Sword, plus the standalone game Civilization IV: Colonization, which were all combined in 2007 into one release edition titled Sid Meier's Civilization IV: The Complete Edition.

Civilization IV follows some of the 4X model of turn-based strategy games, a genre in which players control an empire and "explore, expand, exploit, and exterminate", by having the player attempt to lead a modest group of peoples from a base with initially scarce resources into a successful empire or civilization. The condition for winning the game is accomplished through one of the five ways: militarily defeating all other civilizations in the game world, controlling over two-thirds of the game world's land and population, building the first spaceship in the Space Age and sending it to Alpha Centauri, having the most dominant Culture ratings over other civilizations, or becoming "World Leader" through the United Nations votes. Additionally, there are multiple game scores for each civilization throughout the game based on the actions of each civilization and a number of different factors, allowing for a win condition based on the total of these points if the game timer runs out. The game can be played in multiple modes: as a single player facing against one or more computer-controlled opponents, or through online multiplayer games.
 
As with other turn-based strategy video games, the player can customize the look and feel of their game world as well as the difficulty of any game AI players before the game starts. Each map space has a terrain type, such as plains, tundra, or desert, that affects the available resources players can extract from their environments and the movements of certain units through that terrain. The player is then given a total of 18 different civilizations to choose from, each with their own pros and cons, plus a leader avatar, an initial set of civilization technology, and any units unique to that civilization. When the game starts, however, it chooses random locations to place across a predefined square grid map. Like other strategy games, Civilization IV has a fog of war feature, in which unexplored territory remains darkened and territories without any units stationed on its designated square is shaded with darker colors.

The game had a viral marketing campaign, revolving around a fictitious self-help organization known as Civilization Anonymous (shortened to CivAnon), the intention being to satirise how addictive the game was. With the slogan "No More Turns", the premise was the following: "Rumors have begun to circulate that the newest edition of the "One More Turn" franchise is on its way. STAY AWAY from this game at all costs. You will likely be powerless to its extreme addictive properties once exposed". Various characters were created, and their scenarios were included in various trailers showing the "inside [of] a Civanon meeting for [Civiization] addicts., the first of which being played during E3 2005 once an hour at the 2K Games booth These "video testimonials of supposedly recovering Civilization addicts" also featured cameos by Sid Meier. In addition to this, "official" website was created by 2K Games with extra content. The Civilization Anonymous campaign was brought back for the following game Civilization V. Break described the campaign as "hilarious", while Kotaku described it as a "great promotional campaign" that "comes across as terrifyingly realistic". Destructoid shared this view, saying the support group campaign is "a clever marketing tool", but wishing it existed as "we all know there really are people who suffer from one-more-turn-itis". VantureBeat said the campaign was "incredibly clever and funny", adding "what made it so powerful was not the near-flawless execution and fine detail; it was the fact that it could have been real". 'Ctrl-Alt-Play: Essays on Control in Video Gaming noted the spoof highlighted the series' "hyper-addictive turn-based gameplay".

Pak's Thoughts – If you ever find yourself wishing you could just make the next couple of days completely vanish into the aether, this is the game you boot up to make that happen. There is nothing like plopping your first city down on a prime piece of real estate, picking your first of many technologies, and turning your fledgling city into an empire to be reckoned with. I have a tendency to forget to battle my rivals, though. I’m always too focused on building the next wonder, or connecting my cities via roads, or gaining access to new resources. Most of my victories have been space victories.


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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #97 on: September 20, 2014, 12:14:31 AM »
#2–Mass Effect

(81 Points) 6 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 – Pak-Man and lassieface
We impose order on the chaos of organic evolution. You exist because we allow it, and you will end because we demand it.
Release Date:  November 16, 2007
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Mass Effect is a 2007 science fiction action role-playing third person shooter video game developed by BioWare for the Xbox 360 and ported to Microsoft Windows by Demiurge Studios. The Xbox 360 version was released worldwide in November 2007, published by Microsoft Game Studios. The Microsoft Windows version was released on May 28, 2008, published by Electronic Arts. A PlayStation 3 version from Edge of Reality was released through the Mass Effect trilogy and digitally as a standalone title on PlayStation Network in December 2012.
 
The game takes place in the year 2183, with the player assuming direct control of an elite human soldier named Commander Shepard and setting out to explore the Galaxy on a starship, the SSV Normandy. The eponymous "mass effect" is a form of inertia-suppressing technology, allowing faster-than-light travel.
 
Mass Effect was met with overwhelmingly positive reviews from general publications. Combat and visuals were receiving generally positive responses but much acclaim was given to interactive storytelling, great characters, dialogue, choices and atmospheric scores. Several reviewers deemed Mass Effect as the "Best story ever told in gaming history".

Although most of the game's screen shots and concept art show the same "default" male/female Commander Shepard, it is possible for the player to fully customize his or her character's appearance, gender, abilities and even military background.
 
The game includes six character classes. Each class contains several "talents"; as each talent is leveled, the character either gains stats (extra health, stamina, etc), unlocks new abilities (for example leveling the Shotgun talent unlocks the "Carnage" ability, which allows the character to fire a concentrated explosive blast from the shotgun), or unlocks other talents. Each class also possesses a unique talent with the same name as its respective class; the characters may also have talents tied to their background. Characters who have reached level 20 will unlock a "Rogue VI" side-mission on Luna (Earth's moon) in the Sol System, upon the completion of which the player is allowed to choose a new specialist class, which in turn unlocks a new talent bar. The specialist class the character is offered depends on the base class.
 
When characters are first created, six classes are available: Soldier, Engineer, Adept, Infiltrator, Sentinel, and Vanguard. Soldiers are the most skilled with weaponry, Engineers make the most use of the omni-tool and tech-abilities, and Adepts are the best at using biotic powers. The other three classes are combinations of the first three: Infiltrators are a combination of Soldiers and Engineers, Sentinels are a combination of Engineers and Adepts, and Vanguards are a combination of Soldiers and Adepts. While the combination classes do not have the focus of the main classes, they are versatile and offer unique game-play opportunities. (Vanguards, for example, have access to half of the soldier skills and half of the Adept skills).
 
Players also have some control over their character's back story. They are able to choose to have been either a "spacer" (born and bred in space), a "colonist" (born on one of Earth's extra-solar colonies), or "Earth-born" (hailing from the streets of one of Earth's cities). They also choose whether they have been the sole survivor of a terrible battle, a war hero, or a ruthless soldier. These backgrounds have only a small effect in the game, although many characters will reference the player's chosen background when talking to Commander Shepard. The character's background can also affect whether some side quests are available or not. With only a few exceptions, the character's background does not directly affect the player's dialogue choices.

Pak's Thoughts – I want to live in this universe. I love the characters, love the setting, love the space opera, love the story, and I love that all of the decisions I make in this game echo through the next 2. Sure, the game was a little clunky while BioWare tried to figure out the right balance between RPG and third person shooter, and sure the poorly disguised and seemingly endless elevator loading sequences were a pain, but the overall experience is like none other.


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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #98 on: September 20, 2014, 12:15:08 AM »
#1–Portal

(94 Points) 6 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 –lassieface
This was a triumph. I’m making a note here: HUGE SUCCESS.
Release Date:  October 9, 2007
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Portal is a 2007 first-person puzzle-platform video game developed by Valve Corporation. The game was released in a bundle package called The Orange Box for Microsoft Windows and Xbox 360 on October 9, 2007.
 
The game primarily comprises a series of puzzles that must be solved by teleporting the player's character and simple objects using "the Aperture Science Handheld Portal Device", a device that can create inter-spatial portals between two flat planes. The player-character, Chell, is challenged by an artificial intelligence named GLaDOS (Genetic Lifeform and Disk Operating System) to complete each puzzle in the Aperture Science Enrichment Center using the portal gun with the promise of receiving cake when all the puzzles are completed. The game's unique physics allows momentum to be retained through portals, requiring creative use of portals to maneuver through the test chambers. This gameplay element is based on a similar concept from the game Narbacular Drop; many of the team members from the DigiPen Institute of Technology who worked on Narbacular Drop were hired by Valve for the creation of Portal.
 
Portal was acclaimed as one of the most original games of 2007, despite being considered short in length. The game received praise for its unique gameplay and darkly humorous story. It received acclaim for the character of GLaDOS, voiced by Ellen McLain in the English-language version, and the end credits song "Still Alive" written by Jonathan Coulton for the game. Not counting sales through Steam, over four million copies of the game have been sold since its release. The game's popularity has led to official merchandise from Valve including plush Companion Cubes, as well as fan recreations of the cake and portal gun.

In Portal, the player controls the protagonist, Chell, from a first-person perspective as she is challenged to navigate through a series of rooms using the Aperture Science Handheld Portal Device, or portal gun. The portal gun can create two distinct portal ends, orange and blue. The portals create a visual and physical connection between two different locations in three-dimensional space. Neither end is specifically an entrance or exit; all objects that travel through one portal will exit through the other. An important aspect of the game's physics is momentum redirection. As moving objects pass through portals, they come through the exit portal at the same direction as the exit portal is facing and with the same speed with which they passed through the entrance portal. For example, a common maneuver is to jump down to a portal on the floor and emerge through a wall, flying over a gap or another obstacle. This allows the player to launch objects or Chell herself over great distances, both vertically and horizontally, referred to as 'flinging' by Valve. As GLaDOS puts it, "In layman's terms: speedy thing goes in, speedy thing comes out." If portal ends are not on parallel planes, the character passing through is reoriented to be upright with respect to gravity after leaving a portal end.

Pak's Thoughts – This would have merely been a pretty decent and successful puzzle-platformer if not for the addition of GLaDOS. By the time you’ve made it to the final showdown with GLaDOS, you’re very much ready for it. Her voice- one of the only other voices in the game- has been taunting you for over 2 hours. And while GLaDOS’ passive-aggressive barbs are aimed at player-character Chell, you’re really eager to shut her up once and for all. Plus there was that whole thing with the companion cube. The vengeance isn’t Chell’s vengeance. It’s yours.

I’m not sure if I’d call Portal the best game of its decade, but it was probably one of the most important. This is the game that spawned a billion memes. It holds a special place in the heart of anyone who plays it, and it’s a worthy number one.

That’s all, folks. Thanks to everyone who submitted, and additional thanks to everyone who’s been reading along and following the list.


Offline Compound

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #99 on: September 20, 2014, 01:38:17 AM »
I am Andrew Ryan, and I'm here to ask you a question. Is a man not entitled to the sweat of his brow? "No," says the man in Washington, "it belongs to the poor." "No," says the man in the Vatican, "it belongs to God." "No," says the man in Moscow, "it belongs to everyone." I rejected those answers; instead, I chose something different. I chose the impossible. I chose... Rapture. A city where the artist would not fear the censor; where the scientist would not be bound by petty morality; where the great would not be constrained by the small! And with the sweat of your brow, Rapture can become your city as well.

I am still pissed off that my Bioshock riff got rejected from the Batman and Robin riff. Perfect bucketman joke and it got left on the cutting room floor.

Nothing to do with the list, just that damn quote always reminds me of it.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #100 on: September 20, 2014, 07:52:25 AM »
Great list.  Thanks for the fantastic job, Pak. 

Melee made it high than Brawl for me simply because me and my friends spent a LOT more time with it.  A lot.  We loved Brawl, but we stopped playing it pretty quick.  Also, I don't really like the Smash Ball mechanic in that one, especially since some are so much more potent and unfair than others.

San Andreas was my top GTA game easily.  GTA IV was good but it had some problems: it felt a little more sluggish, and Niko Bellic is an alright character but he is so humourless and dour that it feels inappropriate for the franchise where the fun is rising up the ranks.  In fact, that never really happens in the game either.  I much prefer being able to buy businesses and making my own little empire.  On the other hand, Vice City is good but I don't like Tommy as a character too much.  I think the fact that CJ has loyalties, values and people he likes (as well as the fact that he starts under some people's thumbs and gets betrayed, which makes you want him to succeed) make it a real winner.  It also helps that it is just FUN!  I love the setting, that goes from faux-Hollywood to the backwoods to faux-Vegas and more, there is all sorts of hidden stuff that makes the game super playable and it is just huge in a way that most of the other games weren't, even the admittedly very good Vice City.

Shadow of the Colossus, Bioshock and Portal also made it pretty high on my list.  Great games all.

1.   Wii Sports
2.   Portal
3.   Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas
4.   Ico
5.   Super Smash Brothers Melee
6.   Shadow of the Colossus
7.   Bioshock
8.   Fallout 3

9.   Guitar Hero II
10.   Grand Theft Auto: Vice City
11.   Batman: Arkham Asylum
12.   Kingdom Hearts
13.   Final Fantasy X
14.   Deus Ex
15. Katamari Damacy
16. Mass Effect
17. Osu!! Taketae Ouendan-Dan 2 (the first one was largely remade as "Elite Beat Agents" but this is a tremendously fun rhythm game)
18. Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion
19. Super Mario Galaxy
20. Grand Theft Auto IV
21. Strong Bad’s Cool Game For Attractive People
22. Resident Evil 4
23. Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare
24. Jump Ultimate Stars (It's basically a DS version of Smash Brothers, but with Shounen Jump characters.  Apparently, its popularity was part of the reason that there wasn't a DS version of Smash Brothers)
25. Zack & Wiki


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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #101 on: September 20, 2014, 09:16:33 AM »
Pak's Thoughts – Don’t get me wrong. I love this game and I’ve devoted a hefty portion of my life to it, but how did this do so much better then Brawl? Brawl was an improvement in every way. It was this game, but more. That said, it’s good to see the top 5 starting with such an awesome title, and it keeps getting better from here..

I strongly disagree. Brawl was slowed down significantly. Random tripping was complete garbage. It got rid of a lot of technical tricks that you could do, such as Wave-Dashing. I like Brawl, but it's a notch down from Melee, especially from a competitive standpoint.


Offline Sugar Ray Dodge

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #102 on: September 20, 2014, 09:54:16 AM »
Pak's Thoughts – Don’t get me wrong. I love this game and I’ve devoted a hefty portion of my life to it, but how did this do so much better then Brawl? Brawl was an improvement in every way. It was this game, but more. That said, it’s good to see the top 5 starting with such an awesome title, and it keeps getting better from here..

I strongly disagree. Brawl was slowed down significantly. Random tripping was complete garbage. It got rid of a lot of technical tricks that you could do, such as Wave-Dashing. I like Brawl, but it's a notch down from Melee, especially from a competitive standpoint.

I gotta say that I'm glad Melee came out on top. I got Brawl, and I felt like to was just reheated Melee, and I ended up trading it a few months later with a few other games for... I forget what. I spent hours upon hours playing Melee. It really should have been a GCN launch game.


Offline Sugar Ray Dodge

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #103 on: September 20, 2014, 09:56:54 AM »
Great job, Pak! List making can be time consuming, but this is one of the more fun ones we've had in the last couple years. Here's my list:

1. Final Fantasy IX – PS1
2. WWF No Mercy – N64
3. New Super Mario Bros – DS
4. Animal Crossing – GCN

5. Mario Kart Double Dash – GCN
6. Lego Star Wars (Prequel Trilogy) – PS2

7. Mortal Kombat: Deadly Alliance – PS2
8. Super Smash Bros. Melee – GCN
9. Jak and Daxter – PS2
10. Kingdom Hearts 2 – PS2
11. Final Fantasy X – PS2
12. Madden NFL Football 2005 – PS2
13. New Super Mario Bros. Wii – Wii
14. Chrono Cross – PS1
15. Lego Star Wars (Original Series) – PS2
16. Mario Tennis – N64
17. Super Monkey Ball – GCN
18. Wild Arms 2 – PS1
19. Bomberman Generations – GCN
20. F-Zero: GX – GCN
21. Star Wars: Rogue Leader – GCN
22. Kingdom Hearts – PS2
23. Ratchet and Clank – PS2
24. Luigi's Mansion – GCN
25. Mortal Kombat Deception – PS2


Offline PsychoGoatee

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #104 on: September 20, 2014, 04:49:44 PM »
Fun stuff! And I definitely recommend Half-Life 2 even if you haven't beaten HL1. Personally I've never beaten HL1 either, I thought it started strong and kind of got messy. HL2 I'd say is probably more recommendable, and in general I think is a better game. Still one of the best FPS games ever. And gotta love Silent Hill 2, for me more notably than being a scary game, it's the most depressing game ever made. Cool list.


01. Grand Theft Auto: Vice City (PS2)
02. Max Payne (PC)
03. Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots (PS3)
04. Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater (PS2)
05. Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King (PS2)
06. Resident Evil 4 (Gamecube)
07. Dragon Age: Origins (360)
08. Tales of Symphonia (Gamecube)
09. Mass Effect (360)
10. Grand Theft Auto III (PS2)
11. Half-Life 2 (PC)
12. God of War II (PS2)
13. Doom 3 (PC)
14. Silent Hill 2 (PS2)
15. Metal Gear Solid: The Twin Snakes (Gamecube)
16. The Operative: No One Lives Forever (PC)
17. Ninja Gaiden (Xbox)
18. Grand Theft Auto IV (360)
19. King of Fighters 2000 (Dreamcast)
20. Wet (360)
21. Tomb Raider: Anniversary (PC)
22. Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty (PS2)
23. Hitman 2: Silent Assassin (PC)
24. Mario Kart: Double Dash‼ (Gamecube)
25. Armored Core: For Answer (360)