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Author Topic: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts  (Read 17932 times)

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Offline Relaxing Dragon

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #60 on: September 16, 2014, 10:51:49 AM »
Fallout is a series I kinda wished I got into, but, much like Elder Scrolls, there's something about it that always keeps me away. I think it's just the shear scale of the games, and how they just drop you in to do whatever. Which is a great thing that makes for amazing game play, but at the same time, personally, I felt almost too intimidated to go on. I think I got about ten hours into Oblivion before I gave up because I hadn't the faintest idea if I'd progressed anywhere or not.

 That and first-person never melded for me when it comes to RPGs.

The thing I love about the ES games is that "progress" is something you make up entirely by yourself. You can literally play that game for 800 hours and find things you didn't know about. It's all about discovery and writing your own story.

Unless you're someone who power games. Then it just gets boring.

I think it's more the general feeling of being lost, like I'm adrift in some great ocean. I can actually totally see the appeal, and were I to get into just the right mindset I'd probably be all over it, but as it stands it still seems like just too much for me. Or something like that, since it's all kind of hard to describe.

One of these days I'll pick up New Vegas (it's dirt cheap at this point) and give it a go, though. Assuming I can also spare the many, many necessary hours along with it.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #61 on: September 16, 2014, 10:38:32 PM »
#20–Final Fantasy X

(32 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #11 – Sugar Ray Dodge
Listen to my story. This...may be our last chance.
Release Date:  July 19, 2001
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Final Fantasy X is a role-playing video game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) as the tenth entry in the Final Fantasy series. Originally released in 2001 for Sony's PlayStation 2, the game was re-released as a high-definition port for the PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Vita on March 18, 2014, under the name Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster. The game marks the Final Fantasy series transition from entirely pre-rendered backdrops to fully three-dimensional areas, and is also the first in the series to feature voice acting. Final Fantasy X replaces the Active Time Battle (ATB) system with the "Conditional Turn-Based Battle" (CTB) system, and uses a new leveling system called the "Sphere Grid".
 
Set in the fantasy world of Spira, the game's story revolves around a group of adventurers and their quest to defeat a rampaging monster known as Sin. The player character is Tidus, a blitzball star who finds himself in Spira after his home city of Zanarkand is destroyed by Sin. Shortly after arriving to Spira, Tidus joins the summoner Yuna on her pilgrimage to destroy Sin.

Like previous games in the series, Final Fantasy X is presented in a third-person perspective, with players directly navigating the main character, Tidus, around the world to interact with objects and people. Unlike previous games, however, the world and town maps have been fully integrated, with terrain outside of cities rendered to scale. When an enemy is encountered, the environment switches to a turn-based battle area where characters and enemies await their turn to attack.
 
The gameplay of Final Fantasy X differs from that of previous Final Fantasy games in its lack of a top-down perspective world map. Earlier games featured a miniature representation of the expansive areas between towns and other distinct locations, used for long-distance traveling. In Final Fantasy X, almost all the locations are essentially continuous and never fade out to a world map. Regional connections are mostly linear, forming a single path through the game's locations, though an airship becomes available late in the game, giving the player the ability to navigate Spira faster. Like previous games in the series, Final Fantasy X features numerous minigames, most notably the fictional underwater sport "blitzball".

Pak's Thoughts – I was immediately intrigued by the story in Final Fantasy X. I made it about 2 hours in, and that was about the time I got married and life got very, very busy. I really need to go back and dig in.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #62 on: September 16, 2014, 10:39:41 PM »
#19–F-Zero GX

(32 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 - Tyrant
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Release Date:  July 25, 2003
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
F-Zero GX is a futuristic racing video game for the Nintendo GameCube console. Developed by Sega's Amusement Vision department and supervised and published by Nintendo, it was released in Japan, North America and Europe in 2003. F-Zero GX runs on an enhanced version of the engine used in Super Monkey Ball. F-Zero AX, the arcade counterpart of GX, uses the Triforce arcade system board conceived from a business alliance between Nintendo, Namco and Sega.
 
F-Zero GX is the successor to F-Zero X and continues the series' difficult, high-speed racing style, retaining the basic gameplay and control system from the Nintendo 64 game. A heavy emphasis is placed on track memorization and reflexes, which aids in completing the game. GX introduces a "story mode" element, where the player assumes the role of F-Zero pilot Captain Falcon through nine chapters while completing various missions.
 
F-Zero GX and AX was the first significant video game collaboration between Nintendo and Sega. The game received critical acclaim as one of the best racers of its time and the greatest racer on the GameCube platform. Overall, the game was well received by critics for its visuals, intense action, high sense of speed, and track design. Complaints centered on its sharp increase in difficulty that may alienate players.

F-Zero GX is a futuristic racing game where up to thirty competitors race on massive circuits inside plasma-powered machines in an intergalactic Grand Prix. Tracks include enclosed tubes, cylinders, tricky jumps, and rollercoaster-esque paths. Some courses are littered with innate obstacles like dirt patches and mines. Each machine handles differently and has a grip, boost, and durability trait graded on an A to E scale. Before a race, the player is able to adjust a vehicle's balance between maximum acceleration and maximum top speed. Every machine has an energy meter, which serves two purposes. First, it is a measurement of the machine's health and is decreased, for example, when the machine hits another racer or the side of the track. Second, the player is usually given the ability to boost after the first lap. Boosting greatly increases the racer's speed for a few seconds, but also drains their energy. Pit areas and dash plates are located at various points around the track for vehicles to drive over. The former replenishes energy, while the latter gives a speed boost without using up any energy. The less time spent in the pit area, the less energy will regenerate. Courses may also have jump plates, which launch vehicles into the air enabling them to cut corners.

Pak's Thoughts – This is the F-Zero by which all others will be judged. The graphics were beautiful, the control was perfect and the courses were insane in the best ways possible.

I’ve had the rare honor of playing this game’s arcade sister, F-Zero AX in Vegas. The sit-down machine tilts with the action and things get really intense. Then after you play, it prints out a “Driver’s License” with a random picture of one of the racers that you can insert later on to save your high scores. Since the game’s been out for over a decade and since arcades are pretty much dead, you probably can’t get the driver’s licenses anymore, but if you find a machine, you owe it to yourself to give it a whirl.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2014, 12:42:50 PM by Pak-Man »


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #63 on: September 16, 2014, 10:40:02 PM »
#18–Dragon Age: Origins

(33 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #7 - PsychoGoatee
Join us, brothers and sisters. Join us in the shadows where we stand vigilant. Join us as we carry the duty that cannot be forsworn. And should you perish, know that your sacrifice will not be forgotten... and that one day, we shall join you. 
Release Date:  November 3, 2009
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Dragon Age: Origins is a role-playing video game developed by BioWare's Edmonton studio and published by Electronic Arts. It is the first game in the Dragon Age franchise. The game was released for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 on November 3, 2009, and for Mac OS X on December 21, 2009.
 
Set in the fictional kingdom of Ferelden during a period of civil strife, the player assumes the role of a warrior, mage or rogue coming from an elven, human, or dwarven background who must unite the kingdom to fight an impending invasion by demonic forces. BioWare describes Dragon Age: Origins as a "dark heroic fantasy set in a unique world," and a spiritual successor to their Baldur's Gate series of games, which took place in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting of the Dungeons & Dragons franchise

The game incorporates 6 "Origin Stories", the choice depending on the race and class chosen. Dwarven nobles begin the game as part of the Dwarven royal family, whereas in the Dwarf commoner origin, the player starts as a "lowborn" living in poverty. Elven commoners begin their story in a segregated area in the capital city of Ferelden. In the human noble origin, the player begins as a Cousland, one of the human noble families in Ferelden. Elven and human mages start their story off in the Ferelden's Circle of Magi, and the Dalish Elf story begins with the player living in the forest amongst their clan. Origin stories determine the background of the player's character prior to the main events of the game's story, forming an introduction to the world, and a gameplay tutorial, while also comprising hours of play. Events of an individual Origin are reflected in the game story and characters. Characters that the player meets during the Origin story may reappear throughout the game, some as adversaries.
 
There is no tracking of moral alignment, just party favor. The player can give party members gifts and their dialogue choices can gain favour or displeasure with the group but the moral choices of the player will still affect the story throughout the game. The player will accomplish different goals depending on if they choose to be good or evil, but the decisions that the player makes in the process will change the game world accordingly – deciding who will become king, for example, and affecting nations, races and their places in the world. These decisions will also influence the companion NPCs, possibly causing an NPC to leave the party or even attack the player if they disagree strongly with his or her actions.

Pak's Thoughts – While this game didn’t grab me the way certain other BioWare games that may show up later on this list did, they did a lot of cool things with it. I liked being able to choose my origin story, and I really liked that instead of tracking your actions as good or evil, it all boils down to how much respect you’ll get/lose from your companions for behaving a certain way. Some characters don’t WANT you to do the “right” thing. You have to decide what’s more important. Doing what you feel is right, or impressing the scantily clad Morrigan. (My character is always goodie-goodie. Virtue must prevail!)


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #64 on: September 16, 2014, 10:40:25 PM »
#17–Disgaea: Hour of Darkness

(33 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Compound
To show my appreciation, I'll only beat them half to death. 
Release Date:  January 30, 2003
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Disgaea: Hour of Darkness is a tactical role-playing video game developed and published by Nippon Ichi Software for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console.

Disgaea is a tactical role playing game. Battle gameplay takes place on a map divided into a square grid. The player controls a squad of humanoid units and monsters, which each occupy a single square of the grid and do combat with a group of enemies. Depending on the character and attack selected, the player will be able to deal damage to a specific enemy unit or a designated region of the map. Combat ends when all enemy units or all of the player's units are destroyed.
 
Humanoid characters may lift and throw other units across the map in order to allow allies to move further or force enemies to keep their distance. This even allows the player to capture enemies by throwing them into the base panel; these enemies then become allies, and can be used on subsequent maps. The chance of capturing an enemy in this manner depends on several factors. Failure to capture the enemy will result in the death of all characters inside the base panel, and the enemy will survive.

Pak's Thoughts – I’ve heard good things, and I love a good tactical RPG, but I never gave this one a shot. Looks like fun, though.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #65 on: September 16, 2014, 10:40:54 PM »
#16–Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic

(34 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #7 – Pak-Man
Explanation: It's just that... you have all these squishy parts, master. And all that water! How the constant sloshing doesn't drive you mad, I have no idea... 
Release Date:  July 15, 2003
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic is a role-playing video game developed by BioWare and published by LucasArts. Written by Drew Karpyshyn, the soundtrack for the game was composed by Jeremy Soule. It was released for the Xbox on July 15, 2003.

The game's system is based on Wizards of the Coast's Star Wars Roleplaying Game, which is based on the d20 role-playing game system derived from the Third Edition Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) rules. Players choose from three basic character classes at the beginning of the game, and later choose from three Jedi subclasses. Beyond class, a character has "skills" stats, tiered "feats", and later on, tiered Force powers, similar to magic spells in fantasy games. Feats and Force powers are unlocked every few level-ups, while the player is given skill points to distribute among their skills every level.
 
Combat is round-based; time is divided into discrete rounds, and combatants attack and react simultaneously, although these actions are presented sequentially on-screen. The number of actions a combatant may perform each round is limited. While each round's duration is a fixed short interval of real time, the player can configure the combat system to pause at specific events or at the end of each round, or set the combat system to never automatically pause, giving the illusion of real-time combat. Combat actions are calculated using DnD rules. While these are not displayed directly on the screen, the full breakdown for each action (including die rolls and modifiers) are accessible from a menu.
 
For much of the game, the player can have up to two companions in their party. These companions will participate in combat; they can be manually controlled by the player, or act autonomously if the player does not give them any input. Outside of combat, the companions will randomly engage the player or each other in dialogue, sometimes unlocking additional quests. They will also participate in conversations the player has with other non-player characters.
 
Non-combat interaction with other characters in the game world is based upon a dialogue menu system. Following each statement, the player can select from a list of menu responses. The dialogue varies based on the gender and skills of the main character.
 
The alignment system tracks actions and speech—from simple word choices to major plot decisions—to determine whether the player's character aligns with the light or dark side of the Force. Generosity and altruism lead to the light side, while selfish or violent actions will lead the player's character to the dark side, which will alter the character's appearance, turning their eyes yellow and their skin pale.
 
In addition to the standard role-playing gameplay, there are several minigame events that come up over the course of the game. The player can engage in swoop racing to gain money, and sometimes interplanetary travel will be interrupted by enemy starfighters, which begins a minigame where the player controls a turret to shoot down the opposing starcraft. The player can also engage in a card game known as pazaak, which is similar to the game of blackjack, to gamble money.

Pak's Thoughts – Now here’s a role that’s worth playing! I played this from start to finish and loved every minute of it. Who wouldn’t want to be a Jedi Knight (Or Sith Lord, I suppose) and travel around all the hot spots in the Star Wars Universe? You can see the DNA for the next decade of BioWare games right here. Plus, the game gifted us with HK-47, who may be my favorite droid in any Star Wars continuity.

The list continues tomorrow!


Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #66 on: September 17, 2014, 07:21:16 AM »
#19–Final Fantasy X

(32 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 - Tyrant

Whahuh?


Offline CJones

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #67 on: September 17, 2014, 12:23:21 PM »
I think you've got a typo there on #19.

Also, KotOR is game I really need to try out. I've heard almost nothing but good things about it.


Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #68 on: September 17, 2014, 12:27:29 PM »
I made the mistake of playing KOTOR on the 360.  It's a great game, but there's a glitch that basically halts the game on the 360 if you don't do things in just the right order.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #69 on: September 17, 2014, 12:43:26 PM »
Well I got the first and last letters right... Fixed #19. :^)


Offline Sugar Ray Dodge

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #70 on: September 17, 2014, 03:18:56 PM »
I LOVE F-Zero GX, and it was on my list, but I think its biggest flaw (without taking away from its many, many excellent elements) is that its learning curve is steep as hell. You get it, but it takes hours of crashing into walls to get it right. But once you got it, you got it.


Offline PsychoGoatee

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #71 on: September 17, 2014, 06:03:39 PM »
Fun gamery! Love me some Dragon Age. The kooky Leliana was my fav companion in that one.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #72 on: September 17, 2014, 06:25:45 PM »
I LOVE F-Zero GX, and it was on my list, but I think its biggest flaw (without taking away from its many, many excellent elements) is that its learning curve is steep as hell. You get it, but it takes hours of crashing into walls to get it right. But once you got it, you got it.

I had that game for ages before I learned to play it properly.


Offline Relaxing Dragon

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #73 on: September 17, 2014, 07:39:07 PM »
I forgot to put Knights of the Old Republic on my list?



KOTOR was something of a game-changer for me and my simple, console-playing ways. It's not as though it was my first RPG, or even my first big story-driven game, it was just that I'd never before played a game with so much scope to it. The characters were more interesting, the story was deeper, the choices more wide-reaching, and that's without even counting the fact that it was the most interesting Star Wars thing I'd encountered outside the original movies (it still is, for that matter). One hell of a game, and it's a shame a rushed schedule botched the sequel from being better (or even as good).


Offline Sugar Ray Dodge

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #74 on: September 17, 2014, 08:59:38 PM »
I LOVE F-Zero GX, and it was on my list, but I think its biggest flaw (without taking away from its many, many excellent elements) is that its learning curve is steep as hell. You get it, but it takes hours of crashing into walls to get it right. But once you got it, you got it.

I had that game for ages before I learned to play it properly.

Exactly. Once you get the hang of it it's a very fulfilling game.