Author Topic: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts  (Read 17944 times)

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Offline lassieface

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #45 on: September 15, 2014, 04:33:12 PM »
I can't believe I forgot to vote for Arkham Asylum. Though I liked Arkham City better, it was released too recently. Both games kick ass.

I guess I'm kind of weird. I played Arkham Asylum for several hours before getting board. I just couldn't get into it.


Offline CJones

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #46 on: September 15, 2014, 05:12:52 PM »
I can't believe I forgot to vote for Arkham Asylum. Though I liked Arkham City better, it was released too recently. Both games kick ass.

I guess I'm kind of weird. I played Arkham Asylum for several hours before getting board. I just couldn't get into it.

You should at least try Arkham City. It's much more open world. And the fight against
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
. Absolutely brilliant.


Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #47 on: September 15, 2014, 05:44:58 PM »
I can't believe I forgot to vote for Arkham Asylum. Though I liked Arkham City better, it was released too recently. Both games kick ass.

I guess I'm kind of weird. I played Arkham Asylum for several hours before getting board. I just couldn't get into it.

That was my complaint about the Silver Surfer game.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #48 on: September 15, 2014, 08:35:03 PM »
I can't believe I forgot to vote for Arkham Asylum. Though I liked Arkham City better, it was released too recently. Both games kick ass.

I guess I'm kind of weird. I played Arkham Asylum for several hours before getting board. I just couldn't get into it.

You should at least try Arkham City. It's much more open world. And the fight against
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
. Absolutely brilliant.

That fight pissed me off more than anything. It was awesome but there were only like 3 ways to hit the guy and you had to use 4.


Online Pak-Man

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #49 on: September 15, 2014, 10:41:31 PM »
#25–Soulcalibur II

(28 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #12 –Quantum Vagina
Transcending history, and the world, a tale of souls and swords, eternally retold.
Release Date:  July 5, 2002
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Soulcalibur II is a 2002 video game developed by Project Soul and published by Namco and the third installment in the Soul series of weapon-based fighting games. It was originally released for the arcades, before being ported to the GameCube, PlayStation 2, and Xbox in 2003. The game's plot revolves around an assortment of characters, each with the goal of either destroying Soul Edge or obtaining it to achieve personal goals. Compared to Soulcalibur, Soulcalibur II had improvements in graphics and the game system and introduced several new and guest characters.
 
Key game system improvements include an easier "step" and "avoid" systems, arena walls (rather than ring-out ability on all sides) and wall-specific moves, a three-step Soul Charge system, a clash system that is used when two attacks would hit each other resulting in a white flash, Guard Break attacks which put a blocking player into a post guard-impact state, just frame moves awarding additional hits to players who could time their command inputs well, and a revised Guard Impact system that removed height-based Impact moves and instead used a more unified system (high and mid attacks are countered using Repels, mid and low attacks are countered using Parries).

Four new playable characters were introduced in Soulcalibur II: Cassandra (fighting styles derived from Sophitia), Raphael (unique fighting style), Talim (unique fighting style), and Yun-seong (fighting style derived from Hwang).
 
A new unlockable character Charade, like his predecessors Edge Master and Inferno, switches his style to match existing characters' move lists with each individual round of fighting. The home versions of the game feature Necrid, a new character created by Todd McFarlane, and one of three platform-exclusive characters: Heihachi Mishima from Tekken on the PlayStation 2, Link from The Legend of Zelda on the GameCube and Spawn from the comic book series by McFarlane on the Xbox. The HD version includes both Heihachi and Spawn.
 
Fully returning as playable characters are Astaroth, Cervantes, Ivy, Kilik, Maxi, Mitsurugi, Nightmare, Seung Mina, Sophitia, Taki, Voldo, Xianghua, and Yoshimitsu. Inferno is in the game, but he is not a playable character. Nightmare's third costume is Siegfried (though he is still referred to as Nightmare), while Assassin and Berserker play extremely similar to Hwang and Rock, who did not return from Soulcalibur. Lizardman returns, but is only playable in VS Mode and certain portions of Weapon Master.

Pak's Thoughts – How cool was it to play as Link in a Soulcalibur game? I’m sure Heihachi and Spawn were a blast, too, but I bought the GameCube version and never looked back. Talim is my jam, though. Her two-handed whatever-they-are- sword-glove-thingies- are awesome, and I can dominate my opponents with her.


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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #50 on: September 15, 2014, 10:42:40 PM »
#24–Deus Ex

(29 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #9 - CJones
When due process fails us, we really do live in a world of terror.
Release Date:  June 26, 2000
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Deus Ex is a cyberpunk-themed action-role playing video game—combining first-person shooter, stealth and role-playing elements—developed by Ion Storm and published by Eidos Interactive in 2000. First published for personal computers running Windows, Deus Ex was later ported to Macintosh systems, as well as the PlayStation 2 game console. Set in a dystopian world during the year 2052, the central plot follows rookie United Nations Anti-Terrorist Coalition agent JC Denton, as he sets out to combat terrorist forces, which have become increasingly prevalent in a world slipping ever further into chaos. As the plot unfolds, Denton becomes entangled in a deep and ancient conspiracy, encountering organizations such as Majestic 12, the Illuminati, and the Hong Kong Triads through his journey.
 
Deus Ex incorporates elements from four video game genres: role-playing, first-person shooter, adventure, and "immersive simulation", the last of which being a game where "nothing reminds you that you're just playing a game". For example, the game uses a first-person camera during gameplay and includes exploration and character interaction as primary features.

Gameplay in Deus Ex emphasizes player choice. Objectives can be completed in numerous ways, including stealth, sniping, heavy frontal assault, dialogue, or engineering and computer hacking. This level of freedom requires that levels, characters, and puzzles be designed with significant redundancy, as a single play-through of the game will miss large sections of dialogue, areas, and other content. In some missions the player is encouraged to avoid using deadly force, and certain aspects of the story may change depending on how violent or non-violent the player chooses to be. The game is also unusual in that two of its boss villains can be killed off early in the game, or left alive to be defeated later, and this too affects how other characters interact with the player.

The player assumes the role of JC Denton, a nanotech-augmented operative of the United Nations Anti-Terrorist Coalition (UNATCO). This nanotechnology is a central gameplay mechanism, and allows players to perform superhuman feats.

Pak's Thoughts – I like Deus Ex in theory, but I’ve never been able to get too far past the intro. The idea of mixing some RPG peanut butter into shooter chocolate is promising, and the conspiracy theory thing is always fun, but I’m not very good at playing it. Maybe I just haven’t quite figured out the right play-style.


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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #51 on: September 15, 2014, 10:42:58 PM »
#23–New Super Mario Bros. Wii

(31 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 – ColeStratton
It’s Mario Time!
Release Date:  November 11, 2009
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
New Super Mario Bros. Wii is a 2009 side-scrolling platform video game published and developed by Nintendo for the Wii video game console. The game was released on November 11, 2009, in Australia, November 15, 2009, in North America, November 20, 2009, in Europe and December 3, 2009, in Japan. It is the first game in the Mario main series since Mario Bros. to feature simultaneous multiplayer gameplay, and the first title to include Nintendo's new "Super Guide" feature. To highlight the uniqueness of the title, Nintendo chose to use a red keep case instead of the traditional white. The game is also the first Mario sidescroller to have up to four player multiplayer.
 
The game’s plot is similar to those of other side-scrolling Mario games. New Super Mario Bros. Wii follows Mario as he fights his way through Bowser's henchmen to rescue Princess Peach. Mario has access to several power-ups that help him complete his quest, including the Ice Flower, the Fire Flower, and the Starman, each giving him unique abilities. While traveling through up to nine worlds with a total of 80 levels, Mario must defeat Bowser's children (the Koopalings and Bowser Jr.), Kamek, and Bowser himself before finally saving Princess Peach.
 
While New Super Mario Bros. Wii is a 2D platformer, some of the characters and objects are 3D polygonal renderings on 2D backgrounds, resulting in a 2.5D effect (also seen in New Super Mario Bros.) that visually simulates 3D computer graphics. Players can play as either Mario, his brother Luigi, or two Toad characters: one blue and one yellow (with the first player always as Mario). Controls are similar to those of New Super Mario Bros., albeit with the added abilities of spinning in mid-air by shaking the Wii Remote; and picking up, carrying, and throwing other players. In multiplayer mode, there can be up to four players simultaneously. If players lose a life but have at least one life in reserve, they will re-emerge encased inside a bubble, and can resume play once another player frees them by touching the bubble or a fire/ice ball (the player can shake the Wii Remote to move their bubble closer to an active player, but they cannot free themselves). If players lose a life and do not have any more lives, they must use a Continue and start all over with 5 lives. Players can also encase themselves inside the bubble by pressing the A button while a more skilled player traverses a difficult segment. If every character in a co-op session enters a bubble at the same time (whether through death or by pressing the A button), they will lose the level and must restart.

The game is the first on the Wii to feature "Super Guide", a new system devised by Mario creator Shigeru Miyamoto. During singleplayer mode, if a player dies eight times in a row in any level, a green "!" Block appears, allowing a computer-controlled Luigi to show the player a safe path through the level. The player may interrupt the guide at anytime and take control. After Luigi completes it, the player has the option to try the level again, or skip it completely. However, Luigi will not reveal any Star Coin locations or secret exits.

The game was created in response to Nintendo's head game developer Shigeru Miyamoto's desire to recreate the Mario series's single-player gameplay experience for multiple players, as he was unable to bring these ideas to fruition in previous installments. The idea had specifically been proposed for the original prototype of Super Mario Bros. 2 on the NES/Famicom, but the system was found to be not strong enough to handle the multiple sprites required, and the game was redeveloped at that time. The release of the Wii, in 2006, finally gave Miyamoto a chance to revive this idea, as the hardware finally allowed the smooth display of enough enemies and items on the screen at once, and allowed a camera that could dynamically adapt to the players' movements, ensuring they constantly know what the situation of their character is. Miyamoto said Princess Peach was not a playable character because of her dress, since it would require "special processing and programming to handle how her skirt is handled within the gameplay."

Pak's Thoughts – Get a group of friends/family together to play this and you’re in for a good time. I was thrilled to death that they brought back the Koopalings. Anything that evokes Super Mario 3 is awesome in my book.


Online Pak-Man

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #52 on: September 15, 2014, 10:43:37 PM »
#22–Animal Crossing

(31 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 – Sugar Ray Dodge
Ye can't go wrong
With me cucumber song
Cucumbers, Cucumbers
They make me strong

They're the best ripe an' cold
Long before they gets old
They're so good, no one good
Let them grow mold
Release Date:  April 14, 2001
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Animal Crossing is a life simulation video game developed by Nintendo EAD and published by Nintendo. It was released for the Nintendo 64 in Japan on April 14, 2001 and the Nintendo GameCube the following December as Animal Forest+. It was later released in other countries in 2002-2004. Animal Crossing is an open-ended game in which the player character moves into a village populated with anthropomorphic animals. Throughout the game, the player can interact with the animals as well as other players through the GameCube's memory card. The game is synced with the Nintendo GameCube's internal clock and calendar, allowing the game to be played in real-time, which also follows seasons and holidays. It is one of the best-selling Nintendo GameCube games.

This game is a social simulator that has been dubbed a "communication game" by Nintendo. It is open-ended, and the player's character can live a separate life with little preset plot or mandatory tasks. Players assume the role of a new resident to the town. The gender and looks of the character depend on answers given to a cat named Rover, whom the player meets on the train the character takes to the town. There are also tasks that players can complete and goals they can achieve. The game is played in real-time, observing days, weeks, months and years using the GameCube's internal clock. Many real-life events and holidays span the year, including Independence Day, Halloween, the Harvest Festival (Thanksgiving), and Toy Day (Christmas). Other activities such as fishing tournaments and early-morning fitness classes occur on a regular schedule. When players stop playing, they can talk to their Gyroid, a creature next to their house, to save their progress. If the player turns off the game or resets the GameCube without saving first, a mole called Resetti appears in front of the player's house the next time they play to scold them for resetting; what they achieved during the previous unsaved game is lost, but everything else is kept.
 
One of the main goals of the game, given to the player during the game's opening cut scenes, is to increase the size of the player's character's house. This house is the repository for furniture and other items acquired during the course of the game. It can be customized in several ways, such as roof color, furniture, music, wallpaper and flooring. These customizations are judged by the Happy Room Academy (HRA) every Sunday. Players are given the choice to receive HRA letters at the start of the game; however, the HRA letters are mandatory later in the game.
 
Tom Nook, a tanuki in the Japanese versions and a raccoon in the American and European versions, runs the local store. At the beginning of the game, he gives the player their first house with a mortgage of 19,800 Bells (the in-game currency). After paying the debt, part of which is done through a part-time job with Nook, the house is expanded, prompting another debt from Nook. The house is expanded several times during the course of the game. Players can sell basically anything to Nook in exchange for Bells.
 
The village initially contains six villagers, and more villagers move in or out depending on the player's actions. All villagers are animals and each has a home that the player can visit. There are many possible interactions between the player and the villagers, including talking, trading items, completing tasks, writing letters, and, in e+, buying medicine for when they get sick. Villagers also interact with each other independent of player control.

Fifteen Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) games are normally available to collect in Animal Crossing. North American releases are packaged with a memory card that automatically gives the player two games upon creating a game file. Others are acquired in various ways.

Pak's Thoughts – No matter what type of neurotic tendencies you have, Animal Crossing is there to exploit it and keep you playing. Feel the need to customize things obsessively? You can plaster your own artwork all over town. Always feel a need to have something bigger and better than what you currently have? Your ol’ pal Tom Nook will keep you in upgrades for a good long time. Love to collect items in a set? How does a massive set of bugs, fossils, and fish, available at various times of the year, and sometimes only on special occasions sound?

I especially loved the built-in Nintendo games. Long before Virtual Console was a thing, and before Nintendo even started to consider selling their classic library, Animal Crossing let you play and collect the classics right in the middle of your Animal Crossing game.


Offline Sugar Ray Dodge

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #53 on: September 15, 2014, 10:43:46 PM »
#25–Soulcalibur II

(28 Points) 3 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #12 –Quantum Vagina
Transcending history, and the world, a tale of souls and swords, eternally retold.
Release Date:  July 5, 2002

I very seriously considered including this, but I couldn't justify it as my list was crowded enough as it was with titles I felt were indispensible. I still have lots of fond memories from SC2, though.


Online Pak-Man

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #54 on: September 15, 2014, 10:43:59 PM »
#21–Fallout 3

(32 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 – Johnny Unusual
War… War never changes.
Release Date:  October 28, 2008
Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Fallout 3 is a post-apocalyptic sci-fi action role-playing open world video game developed by Bethesda Game Studios, the third major installment in the Fallout series. The game was released in North America, Europe and Australia in October 2008, and in Japan in December 2008 for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.
 
Fallout 3 takes place in the year 2277, 36 years after the setting of Fallout 2 and 200 years after the nuclear apocalypse that devastated the game's world in a future where international conflicts between the United States and China culminated in a Sino-American war in 2077, due to the scarcity of petroleum reserves that ran the economies of both countries. The player character is an inhabitant of Vault 101, a survival shelter designed to protect up to 1,000 humans from the nuclear fallout. When the player character's father disappears under mysterious circumstances, the Overseer, or the leader of the vault, initiates martial law, and sends security forces after the player, who is forced to escape from the Vault and journey into the ruins of Washington, D.C. to track him down. Along the way the player is assisted by a number of human survivors and must battle a myriad of enemies that inhabit the area now known as the "Capital Wasteland".
 
The game received controversy upon release, including the use of and the ability to be addicted to morphine and other drugs including alcohol in the game for Australia, religious and cultural sentiments in India over the cattle in the game being called Brahmin, and sensitivity in Japan due to a weapon that launches mini nuclear bombs called the "Fat Man" and a quest involving the detonation/disarming of an atomic bomb.

The game starts with the main character as a newborn, whereupon the player determines the race, the gender, and the general appearance of their character. As a one year-old baby, the infant reads a child's book titled You're SPECIAL, where the player can set the character's starting S.P.E.C.I.A.L. primary attributes: Strength, Perception, Endurance, Charisma, Intelligence, Agility, and Luck. The character gains a set of Skills with base levels determined by these attributes. At age 10, the player obtains a Pip-Boy, a computerized wristwatch which allows the player to access a menu with stats, maps, data and items. The player also obtains their first weapon, a BB gun. At age 16, the player takes the Generalized Occupational Aptitude Test (G.O.A.T.) to determine the three Skills they wish the character to focus on.
 
As the character progresses through the game, experience points are earned that are used to achieve levels of accomplishment. Upon achieving a new level, the player receives a set of skill points that can be assigned to improve any of the Skill percentages. For instance, increasing the lock pick skill grants the player the ability to pick harder locks to unlock doors and supply crates. A Perk is granted at each level, which offers advantages of varying quality and form. Many Perks have a set of prerequisites that must be satisfied, and new Perks are unlocked every two levels.
 
An important statistic tracked in the game is karma. Each character has an aggregate amount of karma that can be affected by the decisions and actions made in the game. Positive karmic actions include freeing captives and helping others. Negative karmic actions include killing good characters and stealing. Beyond acting as flavor for the game's events, karma can have tangible effects to the player, primarily affecting the game's ending. Other effects include altered dialogue with non-player characters (NPCs), or unique reactions from other characters. Actions vary in the level of karma change they cause; thus, pickpocketing produces less negative karma than the killing of a good character. However, the player's relationships with the game's factions are distinct, so any two groups or settlements may view the player in contrasting ways, depending on the player's conduct. Some Perks require specific karma levels.

Pak's Thoughts – I grabbed this one at a Gamestop midnight release. Someone was passing out samples of Axe, which is all you need to know about the type of person who shows up to a midnight release for a post-apocalyptic RPG.

That moment when you step outside the Vault for the first time, and everything’s so bright you have to wait for your eyes to adjust in-game, is huge. Already, at that point in the game, you’ve played through your character’s childhood. You know who he/she is and you know what you want to do with him/her. The Elder Scrolls series might be a more pure RPG, but in Fallout, you really feel like you’re playing a role.

That’ll do it for tonight. More tomorrow!


Offline Sugar Ray Dodge

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #55 on: September 15, 2014, 10:45:44 PM »
#23–New Super Mario Bros. Wii

(31 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #8 – ColeStratton
It’s Mario Time!
Release Date:  November 11, 2009

Yet another that Cole has one upped me on, the first being Rugby on the Muppet list, but I'll let it slide because he just did me a HUGE favor. You'll all find out what that is on Friday ;)


Offline Sugar Ray Dodge

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #56 on: September 15, 2014, 10:47:06 PM »
#22–Animal Crossing

(31 Points) 2 of 11 Lists - Highest Ranking - #4 – Sugar Ray Dodge

YES! I was so hoping I'd "win" this one! I was an Animal Crossing ADDICT in late 2002.

Edited to correct title. No idea why I called this Animal Farm...


Online Pak-Man

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #57 on: September 16, 2014, 05:21:22 AM »
By the way, now's the time to start submitting list ideas if you want to run one yourself. You should all know the drill by now. Just PM me a list of no more than 2 ideas for the next list and we'll set up a poll. If your idea wins, you host the list.


Offline Relaxing Dragon

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #58 on: September 16, 2014, 09:58:09 AM »
Fallout is a series I kinda wished I got into, but, much like Elder Scrolls, there's something about it that always keeps me away. I think it's just the shear scale of the games, and how they just drop you in to do whatever. Which is a great thing that makes for amazing game play, but at the same time, personally, I felt almost too intimidated to go on. I think I got about ten hours into Oblivion before I gave up because I hadn't the faintest idea if I'd progressed anywhere or not.

 That and first-person never melded for me when it comes to RPGs.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LoC #81 - Top 50 Video Games of the Oughts
« Reply #59 on: September 16, 2014, 10:29:32 AM »
Fallout is a series I kinda wished I got into, but, much like Elder Scrolls, there's something about it that always keeps me away. I think it's just the shear scale of the games, and how they just drop you in to do whatever. Which is a great thing that makes for amazing game play, but at the same time, personally, I felt almost too intimidated to go on. I think I got about ten hours into Oblivion before I gave up because I hadn't the faintest idea if I'd progressed anywhere or not.

 That and first-person never melded for me when it comes to RPGs.

The thing I love about the ES games is that "progress" is something you make up entirely by yourself. You can literally play that game for 800 hours and find things you didn't know about. It's all about discovery and writing your own story.

Unless you're someone who power games. Then it just gets boring.