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Author Topic: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)  (Read 1271 times)

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Offline Variety of Cells

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Re: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)
« Reply #30 on: September 12, 2020, 10:08:20 PM »
I found turning with the pedals real touchy at first.  Then I adjusted the response curves in the control settings and it helped out a ton.  Now it feels more natural.  Not sure how touchy real pedals are supposed to be.

Just did a live time and weather flight in Sweden.  This sunrise was my reward.  Oh, and about $4,100 in FSE.



Did an ILS flight and that worked pretty well.  The PAPI lights make a lot of sense now too, thanks. 


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)
« Reply #31 on: September 12, 2020, 11:38:32 PM »
I've adjusted the response curves, it's the direction that I just can't get used to.

I guess in my head I'm steering as if my feet were on a steering wheel, so pushing on the right side would turn a wheel counterclockwise and therefore turn left, pushing right to turn right is backwards to me.

I just taxied all around KPHL for miles and still can't get it, if I lose concentration for a second the reverse thinking kicks in and I'm all over the place.  This is going to take me a very long time to get natural at.

I can use the toe breaks to steer very well, that makes perfect sense to me, stop the right tire to pivot right.  MSFS doesn't seem to model the toe breaks very well, in X-Plane you can spin the plane around the tire that is locked.

Once in the air everything is fine, doing coordinated turns and slips are much easier with pedals vs. other methods of controlling the rudder.


Offline Variety of Cells

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Re: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)
« Reply #32 on: September 13, 2020, 07:49:02 PM »
So I think I understand fuel mixture. You’re looking to lean out to maximum rpm when above 4,000 ft, and then go a little richer, as it’s not great to run it at its most optimum.  And there was one other meter to look at to help... forget the name of that.

But my question is, for planes that have a dedicated RPM control (that maps to another axis on my throttle), is there a general rule where to set that and when?  Can’t recall if that plane also had a mixture setting.

EDIT: Found that I was describing a constant speed motor, and I found a pretty good article on it.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2020, 09:57:27 PM by Variety of Cells »


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)
« Reply #33 on: September 14, 2020, 08:19:53 AM »
I've just started using manual mixture myself since the new throttle has a wheel I wasn't using for anything else, previously I had always used the auto mixture setting in sims.

I think the other meter you are thinking of is temperature (I think it's exhaust temp but not sure off the top of my head), in the instructions for setting the mixture on the DC3 in X-Plane they say to lean it out until the temperature gauge peaks, then make it a little bit more rich.


Offline Variety of Cells

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Re: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)
« Reply #34 on: September 14, 2020, 09:56:11 PM »
Spent a ton of time trying to find where the mixture and propeller pitch controls were on the Daher TBM 930 and the Diamond A62. Now that I have everything on manual I wanted to know where the physical controls were in the simulation, not just on my joystick. Well, turns out they don’t have manual controls, it’s all automated and tied into the one throttle. Had to read through a substantial portion of the actual manual to figure that out. And it wasn’t really in there. Found it in some promotional material for the Daher 900 that mentioned they combined all those features to automatically adjust with the one control.  Fancy new planes. They are my favorites so far though.

What was throwing me off is that I could still manually change the propeller pitch and fuel mixture with my joystick on the Daher, so I assumed you must be able to in the actual plane. I now think that’s just a mistake in the simulation.


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)
« Reply #35 on: September 14, 2020, 10:19:53 PM »
Had a look through the Daher TBM 930 manual and that crazy gearshift shaped throttle does control propeller pitch and the power.  If they have the mixture doing anything for a turboprop engine then the sim is wrong, no mixture or rpm controls for a turbine.


Offline Variety of Cells

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Re: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)
« Reply #36 on: September 17, 2020, 11:01:35 PM »
New update to MSFS2020 brought some welcome changes.  There are rain effects on the windshield now that are nice.  Perhaps best of all there are now more than just one ATC voice, including some women.  There were also some crash and performance fixes.  By default, the MFD and PFD displays don't update as frequently which helps with CPU bottlenecks, and it has better multithread optimization.  The game has been running a lot smoother for me.  I haven't had any more 5-second freezes like I was frequently getting.  And no more crashes when trying to select an IFR route in the menu.  But I can't be sure if that's because of the update, or if it's due to me increasing my page file size as a troubleshooting step for crashed in a separate game.

EDIT:  If I understand this correctly, my issues were most likely due to the large number of commit charge usage MSFS generates, and increasing my pagefile size, or virtual memory as windows 10 is calling it, is probably what has helped, instead of the new update.  I wasn't monitoring this before I changed my pagefile size, but my commit charge usage during my last flight was up to about 27GB.  And if my pagefile size was in fact 0 on the hard drive I have MSFS installed on as it says it was, then my previous max was only 16GB, and would explain the freezes and crashing.  Now I set the pagefile size to 16GB, which should give me 32GB of commit charge.  I think that's how that works anyway.  It's also 3am, and I don't know what the correct grammar for commit charge is.  Commit charge usage?  Commit charges?  Commit charged?  I'm going to bed.

EDIT EDIT:  After more research about pagefile, I am now just confused.  Lots of conflicting information out there.  Originally, when trying to fix the crashing in Half Life Alyx, I was told that setting a pagefile on the drive where it is installed is important.  But now I'm reading that that's not entierly true, and just because the game is installed on one drive doesn't mean it can't use the pagefile from another drive.  I did switch it from system managed to a set number.  Some people say that's better, others say it's worse.  I don't know.  I'm going to bed.  For real this time.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2020, 12:37:03 AM by Variety of Cells »


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)
« Reply #37 on: September 18, 2020, 07:42:47 AM »
I normally reboot before running MSFS to have as little in memory as possible, and I also don't have very many programs starting at boot time.  If I tab out of MSFS I am routinely seeing over 20GB ram committed in taskmanager.

Back when ram was expensive and I never had enough I was always tinkering with the page file, amazing that people with 16GB will need to start messing with it again, seems we really have moved to a time when 32GB is going to be needed to run stuff smoothly.

You want your page file on the fastest drive you have in your system, and it is best to set it to a certain size.  Windows tends to make it kind of small.

If the page file is on an SSD there's nothing more to do, if you are going to have it on a spinning disk it would be optimal to set it up on a freshly defraged drive and preferably one that doesn't have much on it, the closer to the start of the drive the better since read/write times are slightly faster.  Basically on a spinning disk you want the page file as a single block near near the start of the drive.

As for having it on the same drive as the game, that would only matter on slow drives, where reading and writing to the game and the page file would be much slower if they were on the same drive.  If the game and page file are on the same SSD that would still be faster than one of them on a spinning disk.  Of course if you have 2 SSDs it probably would be slightly faster to split them up.


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)
« Reply #38 on: September 18, 2020, 07:47:47 AM »
Word about the lastest patch, I had installed a few freeware aircraft and I had to remove them after the patch, they were messing up the stock aircraft.  Only change I've seen on my system is that the real world weather does seem to be working better.


Offline Variety of Cells

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Re: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)
« Reply #39 on: September 18, 2020, 10:40:02 AM »
I have a pagefile set up on my NVME C: drive that I changed from system managed to min 8GB and max 16GB.  Then I also set up an 8GB min and 16GB max pagefile on the SSD where I store all (or most) of my games.  Things are running smoothly now so I think I'm just going to let it be and not mess with it any more, even if the benefits I'm seeing might be coincidental.


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)
« Reply #40 on: September 18, 2020, 11:57:53 AM »
Not sure the multiple page file option is that great, I would think it would be better to have one large one on your fastest drive.  It is a supplement to RAM,  so speed of access is the important thing for the page file.

I'm guessing with the 16GB available on the NVME drive you should never need the 2nd one.

Other thing I remember doing was to set the page file min and max the same, but that was on spinning disks, so the block of data was continuous on the drive, with SSDs that doesn't matter.


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)
« Reply #41 on: October 30, 2020, 01:46:56 PM »
The last few patches to MSFS have improved things quite a bit, no more trees growing on the battleship NJ or on buildings in Philly, real weather seems to be better, and some other improvements to IFR flying.  I'm still flying mostly the small planes with gauges in MSFS, using XP11 for flying planes with the glass cockpits since it has more features implemented.

I am finally getting used to steering on the ground with the pedals, I still have to think more than usual about it but at least I don't have to concentrate so hard on pushing the foot forward for the direction I want to turn.  Funny that I got used to it right away in the air, it's only on the ground I tend to reverse things.

Flying with real weather is a lot harder, attempted a flight from Philly to Wilmington last night during the storm, this would be about 20 minutes driving time, usually with clear weather it's about a 10 minute flight, fighting the winds I had a heck of a time just getting south in the Cessna 172, couldn't see the lights on the ground above 2K ft so was constantly losing orientation when higher, since I couldn't see very well I went with the ILS at the airport but that meant landing with the wind at my back, bad idea, was hard to get a good glide slope and then a gust of wind slammed me into the runway at the last second.  That's why you don't fly a small plane in bad weather....  2 weeks ago I tried a landing with 20kt crosswind gusts and that did not end well either.


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)
« Reply #42 on: October 30, 2020, 11:08:19 PM »
Since I built my pedals I've wanted some way to tell when they are centered, but did not want springs to push them back to center, if you are using the rudder to maintain course against wind you want to be able to leave the rudder at a certain angle for a long time.  Your legs are not great at giving you feedback if your feet are perfectly in line with each other so slight accidental rudder being applied sometimes has been an issue.  Tonight I finally thought of a way to do it, made a spring loaded block with a bump that matches the indent of the extruded frame, so it clicks in when the pedals are centered but only gives a slight resistance to movement.



Offline Variety of Cells

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Re: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)
« Reply #43 on: October 31, 2020, 05:51:48 AM »
Do actual rudder pedals try to return to center?


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: Flight Yoke (now with flight sim reviews)
« Reply #44 on: October 31, 2020, 08:35:53 AM »
Do actual rudder pedals try to return to center?

The flight controls on planes don't have mechanical return to center, but the air pressure on the control surfaces pushes them back during flight.  On home setups centering is wrong but no centering is also wrong, so if you don't have force feedback you have to pick one or the other.  Normally during flight you trim until there is no force on the control, but most small aircraft only have elevator trim, no rudder or aileron trim.

Now I've got to look up if fly by wire jets have some kind of force feedback system....  And the answer seems to be that some do and some don't...