Author Topic: 3D printing  (Read 27375 times)

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Online k1

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Re: 3D printing
« Reply #165 on: February 21, 2018, 04:10:02 PM »
I like the option of having the scanner built in but reviews seem to say it’s not so great at scanning.

There are still no consumer priced scanners that work all that well, they all have serious limitations and produce low quality models. 

They are OK if you want to scan simple things, but anything with overhangs or holes causes problems.

Looking at reviews I don't like what I see about that printer....

Not sure what commercial printer I would get right now, if I were buying another printer now I'd go with the Prusa i3 MK3 kit.  Not sure if you can get those already assembled.  How are you at putting stuff together, maybe watch some videos on building the Prusa kit.

I'd certainly be willing to give it a shot.  My main thoughts for the Da Vinci was the enclosed printer because of my cat (the kids fortunately know not to touch it) and the option for the laser engraving.

This is the kit you were talking about right? http://amzn.to/2CdB1VJ
Or would I be better off getting the MK3?

« Last Edit: February 21, 2018, 04:12:11 PM by k1 »


Online MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: 3D printing
« Reply #166 on: February 21, 2018, 04:19:28 PM »
 Cats would certainly be drawn to the fast movement of the print head.  So you would want to keep them away somehow.

 Not sure how good the laser engraving is on these home printers, it doesn't seem possible when stand alone engravers cost much more.  Also, messing with high powered lasers in the home is not a great idea, one mistake can cause permanent eye damage.  A reflection off a couple shiny surfaces is all that is needed.

 That link is to the mark 2 that came out a few years ago, still a good printer and a bargain at that price, the current price on them MK3 kit is just under $800.

 Prusa does sell pre-assembled printers but the price is $250 more than the kits, this is the direct Prusa website:

https://shop.prusa3d.com/en/17-3d-printers



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Re: 3D printing
« Reply #167 on: February 22, 2018, 07:48:45 AM »
I saw in the questions section that it’s not an official Prisma, but a clone. Should I avoid that one?


Online MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: 3D printing
« Reply #168 on: February 22, 2018, 10:04:19 AM »
I saw in the questions section that it’s not an official Prisma, but a clone. Should I avoid that one?

That's a tough call, the Prusa is open source, so anyone can get the parts list and the CAD files for the plastic parts and make their own kits.  As long as that vendor followed the list and used a good printer to print the plastic parts it would be the same as the kits offered at the official Prusa site, if they put lower quality parts in the kit then it's a gamble.

No reviews at all for that printer is a red flag I guess, only 1 feedback on the seller, and the seller only seems to be selling 4 things, so maybe too much of a risk at $500 after you add the $50 shipping.  :(

Spent some time looking through what is out there now, maybe the best recommendation would be to go with the da Vinci Jr. 1.0 Pro without the scanner:

https://smile.amazon.com/Open-Filament-XYZprinting-Vinci-Printer/dp/B01MUBKPFC?ref=ast_p_ep

The other company I'd look at would be Flashforge but their's are now getting a bit pricey.  Funny that a lot of the companies that started out makeing cheaper printers have gotten more expensive as the companies have grown.


Offline Darth Geek

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Re: 3D printing
« Reply #169 on: February 22, 2018, 10:07:20 AM »

I'd certainly be willing to give it a shot.  My main thoughts for the Da Vinci was the enclosed printer because of my cat (the kids fortunately know not to touch it) and the option for the laser engraving.

You're going to reenact the Every Country Has A Monster song, aren't you?



Online k1

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Re: 3D printing
« Reply #170 on: February 22, 2018, 02:38:40 PM »

I'd certainly be willing to give it a shot.  My main thoughts for the Da Vinci was the enclosed printer because of my cat (the kids fortunately know not to touch it) and the option for the laser engraving.

You're going to reenact the Every Country Has A Monster song, aren't you?

OH MY WORD THAT IS A GOOD IDEA


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Re: 3D printing
« Reply #171 on: February 25, 2018, 09:40:45 AM »
Leaning towards the Prusa Mk3 kit. Seems like a better option in case a part breaks or I want to upgrade it.


Offline Variety of Cells

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Re: 3D printing
« Reply #172 on: February 25, 2018, 10:13:01 AM »
Leaning towards the Prusa Mk3 kit. Seems like a better option in case a part breaks or I want to upgrade it.

Let us know how far you lean so I can satiate my desire for a printer vicariously through you.


Online MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: 3D printing
« Reply #173 on: February 25, 2018, 12:00:47 PM »
Leaning towards the Prusa Mk3 kit. Seems like a better option in case a part breaks or I want to upgrade it.

Awesome, it is a great printer, I did my home made large printer based on that design. 

And since you'll be putting it together you'll know how to fix it, because if you really get into printing a lot of stuff you will need to do minor repairs and fixes when something like an extruder clog happens.  I think they still use the E3D V6 hot end, so you can get replacement extruder parts easily without going through Prusa.

Just don't expect to print big stuff, it's kind of a trap, you get an idea to print something big and then you see the print time going up to 36 hours and give up.  You really shouldn't let these run unattended, or at least don't leave the house while it's printing, it's a device that melts plastic at 200°C (400°F) and has wires flapping around, so there is a small risk of it catching on fire.  So put it in a room with a smoke detector.



Offline Variety of Cells

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Re: 3D printing
« Reply #174 on: March 22, 2018, 02:47:57 PM »
Leaning towards the Prusa Mk3 kit. Seems like a better option in case a part breaks or I want to upgrade it.

Awesome, it is a great printer, I did my home made large printer based on that design. 

And since you'll be putting it together you'll know how to fix it, because if you really get into printing a lot of stuff you will need to do minor repairs and fixes when something like an extruder clog happens.  I think they still use the E3D V6 hot end, so you can get replacement extruder parts easily without going through Prusa.

Just don't expect to print big stuff, it's kind of a trap, you get an idea to print something big and then you see the print time going up to 36 hours and give up.  You really shouldn't let these run unattended, or at least don't leave the house while it's printing, it's a device that melts plastic at 200°C (400°F) and has wires flapping around, so there is a small risk of it catching on fire.  So put it in a room with a smoke detector.

I think I read that or heard that some have a pause function.  Does that actually work?  Or will there be an irregularity at the point where it paused?


Online MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: 3D printing
« Reply #175 on: March 22, 2018, 03:58:01 PM »
Leaning towards the Prusa Mk3 kit. Seems like a better option in case a part breaks or I want to upgrade it.

Awesome, it is a great printer, I did my home made large printer based on that design. 

And since you'll be putting it together you'll know how to fix it, because if you really get into printing a lot of stuff you will need to do minor repairs and fixes when something like an extruder clog happens.  I think they still use the E3D V6 hot end, so you can get replacement extruder parts easily without going through Prusa.

Just don't expect to print big stuff, it's kind of a trap, you get an idea to print something big and then you see the print time going up to 36 hours and give up.  You really shouldn't let these run unattended, or at least don't leave the house while it's printing, it's a device that melts plastic at 200°C (400°F) and has wires flapping around, so there is a small risk of it catching on fire.  So put it in a room with a smoke detector.

I think I read that or heard that some have a pause function.  Does that actually work?  Or will there be an irregularity at the point where it paused?

Some newer printers do have that, the latest Prusa even has the option to recover from a power failure.

I haven't seen any reviews on how well it works.  I could see a pause working well if the printer finished an outer layer and then moved inside a fill area to pause, but with a power failure there's no control of where the print stopped, if it was on an outside wall I'd think there would be a deformity in that area because of the heat from the nozzle (it takes several minutes for the nozzle to cool down).


Online MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: 3D printing
« Reply #176 on: March 22, 2018, 04:06:29 PM »
As for my printer I just installed a sheet of BuildTak on it, so much nicer than painters tape, print sticks well without having to squash the first layer, sometimes sticks too well but so far I haven't damaged the BuildTak while removing prints.

Printed this 200mm tall Nomad model last night:



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Re: 3D printing
« Reply #177 on: March 23, 2018, 06:02:59 PM »
I saw a few videos of people unplugging the Prusa mk3 mid print. Didn’t seem to have any issues.

I haven’t ordered my printer yet. Seems to still have a backlog on orders but it’s not as long as a wait as it was a month ago.


Online MartyS (Gromit)

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Re: 3D printing
« Reply #178 on: March 23, 2018, 07:27:47 PM »
Someone at work just ordered a pre-built one, seems pre-built ones are shipping about a week faster than the kits, he said it was expected to ship April 9th. 

The more I look at that printer the more tempted I am to order one, my home made printer is pretty good but there are a few little issues with not perfectly smooth sides near sharp corners (ringing that I haven't been able to get rid of unless I lower the print speed a lot).


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Re: 3D printing
« Reply #179 on: April 19, 2018, 12:23:09 PM »
We got the Prusa MK3 at work, it's an amazing printer, biggest surprise is how quiet it is.