Author Topic: 3D printing  (Read 20229 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Compsognathus
  • *****
  • Posts: 10020
  • Liked:
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
3D printing
« on: June 15, 2014, 11:11:30 PM »
Was seriously bored this weekend, so build one of the small 3D printer kits, the thing is one step above duct tape and chewing gum but it works.  Seriously, the thing is held together with tie wraps and instead of belts and pulleys the axis are driven by string wrapped around those sanding cylinders you put on a dremel.

It's the printrbot simple maker kit, about $350.  They have a great web site that tells you everything except where to download all the drivers and software you need, I had to google the programs they kept saying to use so I could find them to download...

4X4X4.5 inch print area.

Some pictures of the thing:







Offline Variety of Cells

  • Climbed El Capitan
  • *******
  • Posts: 5283
  • Liked:
Re: 3D printing
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2014, 10:59:00 AM »
Is it working well?  Was calibrating a pain in the ass?  Do you keep having to recalibrate?  What tools did you need for build and assembly?

Those are the potential issues that keep me from getting one of my own.


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Compsognathus
  • *****
  • Posts: 10020
  • Liked:
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
Re: 3D printing
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2014, 11:32:03 AM »
Leveling the bed is a pain, I'm considering modifying it to be 3 points instead of 4.  Leveling something with 4 screws in the corners takes a lot of passes back and forth.  And I've had lots of practice with leveling lab equipment, someone without any experience would have quite a learning curve.  And the bed has to be level and the proper distance from the nozzle to get a good first layer.  Basically you put a sheet of paper between the bed and the nozzle and adjust the bed until there is a little bit of friction, repeat that in the 4 corners until it is the same amount of friction everywhere.

Next tricky thing is getting the print to stick to the bed, been reading various tricks for that and sanding the masking tape I have worked, along with changing some settings for the first layer.   I have to get out and pick up some of the 3M blue painters tape everyone uses.

And yes you do have to keep re-leveling the bed, although once it is good it only requires small adjustments after you pull a build off or put new tape down.

I'm still messing with settings to get good printing, that's not so much of a pain as it is a lot of trail and error, adjusting speeds and distances then trying a print.  Printing is slow, and subtle problems don't start to show up until the print is well along, so half an hour or so before you see something wrong and kill the print to try a different setting.


This is the web page of instructions for building the kit, it explains what you need to build it the best:

http://help.printrbot.com/Guide/2014+Printrbot+Simple/88

Edit: new link for the actual kit I got.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2014, 11:35:55 AM by MartyS (Gromit) »


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Compsognathus
  • *****
  • Posts: 10020
  • Liked:
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
Re: 3D printing
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2014, 09:02:30 PM »
Getting it dialed in.

5mm blocks:



The blue painters tape is much better, I tried the Eiffel Tower several times on the other tape and the "legs" kept popping off or wobbling, with the blue tape it's sticking really well:



I have to find a more simple model, my cheap printer doesn't have the resolution for all the detail on this one.


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Compsognathus
  • *****
  • Posts: 10020
  • Liked:
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
Re: 3D printing
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2014, 10:07:24 PM »
Definitely not enough resolution for this model... 



The PLA does stick to the blue tape really well, while prying it off the bed it went flying across the room and the top broke off.

Now I've got to see if I can revive my 3D modeling skills, got pretty good at it back in the late 90s building planes for the flight simulator Fly!, but I just installed TrueSpace and can't remember a thing about how to create objects with it, and I'm not sure it can write the files needed for slicing anyway.  Might have to look at some of the freeware cad programs out there.


Online Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26004
  • Liked:
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: 3D printing
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2014, 07:05:52 AM »
http://grabcad.com/library has a lot of really cool CAD models you can download.

I always wanted to get one of these Braingears and make it 3D printed
http://grabcad.com/library/brain-gear




Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Compsognathus
  • *****
  • Posts: 10020
  • Liked:
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
Re: 3D printing
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2014, 11:03:21 AM »
Lots of those on Thingiverse, the really high end printers can do them in one go.
split up into sections that can be glued together it's not that hard of a print for even a printer like mine.


Soguru

  • Guest
Re: 3D printing
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2014, 05:56:24 PM »
You will have to pardon me because I don't have the patience or fortitude to do my research so would someone be so kind as to kind of explain some questions I have? What kind of material does a 3D printer use to create something? Can I use it to make toys like my own customized Star Wars or Dr Who figures? Can it scan from a physical template or must it be digital?


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Compsognathus
  • *****
  • Posts: 10020
  • Liked:
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
Re: 3D printing
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2014, 07:44:01 PM »
You will have to pardon me because I don't have the patience or fortitude to do my research so would someone be so kind as to kind of explain some questions I have? What kind of material does a 3D printer use to create something? Can I use it to make toys like my own customized Star Wars or Dr Who figures? Can it scan from a physical template or must it be digital?

The most common type of home printer uses plastic, PLA or ABS are the 2 most common types.  You buy a spool of plastic filament, it goes into a heated nozzle where it's melted and put down in thin layers on the print bed.  There are lots of more advanced types, liquid resin, metal powder, etc....

It's all digital, the printer needs X Y Z information from a file.  If you have an object you want to copy you have to either build it in a CAD program or scan it using a 3D scanner.  Makerbot has a home 3D scanner for I think about $700, it's a turntable with 2 lasers and a camera.


Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Compsognathus
  • *****
  • Posts: 10020
  • Liked:
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
Re: 3D printing
« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2014, 12:28:25 PM »
Glad I didn't jump right into getting a big expensive printer, this kit has been teaching me a lot.

There are so many variables, temperatures, speeds, different ways of filling in, messing around with downloaded objects is showing me what works and what doesn't.  Got the standard large bolt and nut printed and works, nautilus gears work, Eiffel tower printed larger in 4 parts worked well but still too much fine detail for the little printer.

Finally got smart and started doing all the slicing on my desktop and transfer the files to the laptop connected to the printer through the network, way faster to try different settings running the slicer program on my desktop.

Now I've got to try to design and build something, been trying out lots of free CAD programs, the thing with the free ones is that one might be good for one type of object but lousy at others, still going through them, hope I can get it down to only needing to learn 2 programs.

Of course the danger is if I do manage to design and build some of my own stuff, it will get me thinking about buying a larger printer with better resolution.



Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Compsognathus
  • *****
  • Posts: 10020
  • Liked:
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
Re: 3D printing
« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2014, 09:35:26 PM »
Still haven't created something in CAD and printed it.

Downloaded stuff that has come out well:



The chain took forever, must have tried 20 ways of starting the first layer, one or 2 pads for the links would always pop off when it got up to 3 or 4 layers.


Online Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26004
  • Liked:
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: 3D printing
« Reply #11 on: June 23, 2014, 10:03:53 AM »
Those look really good. What type of resin?



Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Compsognathus
  • *****
  • Posts: 10020
  • Liked:
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
Re: 3D printing
« Reply #12 on: June 23, 2014, 10:30:36 AM »
The little printer uses PLA plastic filament only.  To use ABS plastic you need a heated build platform.


Online Darth Geek

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26004
  • Liked:
  • I am boring and destined to die alone!
Re: 3D printing
« Reply #13 on: June 23, 2014, 11:28:18 AM »
So are you planning on making yourself a Mr. T style set of chains to wear at all times?



Offline MartyS (Gromit)

  • Compsognathus
  • *****
  • Posts: 10020
  • Liked:
  • Weirdies!
    • My homepage
Re: 3D printing
« Reply #14 on: June 23, 2014, 02:02:28 PM »
I think that might be hard to do in a 4X4 inch area.  ;D

Been looking at escapement designs for making a clock, a pin escapement would probably be best for making on the little printer.  Rubber bands instead of a spring might also work.  Lots of ideas in my head, just need to find and learn a good free CAD program to create the parts.