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Author Topic: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's  (Read 32031 times)

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Offline The Lurker

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #105 on: September 25, 2013, 06:33:37 PM »
Interesting, we're getting into a little "I've riffed this" section of the list.
If only this was still in print...


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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #106 on: September 25, 2013, 06:39:50 PM »
I know people here seem to love it, but to me the Last Unicorn is a real mixed bag.  The stuff that's good is really good (much of the animation, the voice acting, especially Christopher Lee doing an amazing job, much of the dialogue, the clever toying with archetypes), the stuff that is not (the other animation, the music of America, the feeling like some character stuff didn't have the opportunity to properly set in, like some great character stuff was there, but was cut for time, the butterfly at the beginning that makes pop culture references) is really not.


Offline ColeStratton

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #107 on: September 25, 2013, 06:51:39 PM »
I LOVE the music by America. The singing voice of Mia Farrow? Not so much.
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Offline RoninFox

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #108 on: September 25, 2013, 07:16:29 PM »
I don't think its going out on a limb to say that Last Unicorn is the best looking piece of animation work Rankin/Bass ever made.  It definately has some weird issues though, which worked out great for me.

Good to hear Beagle is getting a settlement out of all the crap he's gone through.  He really got screwed over hard by two animated movies.  He wrote the screenplay for Bakshi's Lord of the Rings movie for a pittance on the promise of more and better paying work that never materialized, and then there were all the unpaid royalties for this. 
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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #109 on: September 25, 2013, 07:42:12 PM »
Also, I'm sure I'm alone on this, but I would love to see a live action adaptation of the Last Unicorn.  Christopher Lee can reprise his role (and time has made him even more fitting for it) and you can get someone like Terry Gilliam who is great at mixing the darkness and whimsy so well.  Or maybe Guillermo del Toro.  Despite not really caring for Pacific Rim, I think his style would be really suited for it.

Christopher Lee is by far my favourite thing about the Last Unicorn.  He is fucking amazing as the lead villain and imbues him with a lot of pathos where it could have been a one note villain with a bad childhood.  I guess that's another thing that dissappointed me about it: I felt that I wished the movie dived more into the idea of subverted archetypes.  Haggard gets a lot of good stuff: he's a dark evil lord, but he's barely ruling over everyone and he doesn't have a big plan: he's just letting himself rot in a creepy "house of Usher" type castle while enjoying his unicorns.  But I wish more time and care was spent on his knightly son, who clearly wants to be a good heroic knight character but clearly doesn't have a lot to do.  We don't nearly spend enough time with him.  Or Molly Grue, who seems like a maiden who was supposed to be a fairy tale hero but life didn't go well.  She gets a few really good scenes, but the film doesn't feel entirely cohesive in this regard.


Offline CJones

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #110 on: September 25, 2013, 08:04:48 PM »
I recently re-watched The Last Unicorn (with RoninFox's riff). It really isn't as good as I remembered. Mia Farrow can't sing, Jeff Bridges is terrible, and that butterfly makes me want to rip his wings off.

However, Haggard (Christopher Lee) gives the second best villain speech I've ever heard. The first being the Ur-Quan from Star Control 2 (aka The Ur-Quan Masters, which is totally free, and one of the best games ever). The woman who played Molly was also very good, and it cheeses me off that the current version of the movie cuts out the part where she says "damn you, where where you when I was young"


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #111 on: September 25, 2013, 08:05:54 PM »
#14 –My Neighbor Totoro
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Release Date:  1988

Just the Plagarism
My Neighbor Totoro (となりのトトロ Tonari no Totoro?) is a 1988 Japanese animated fantasy film written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki and produced by Studio Ghibli. The film stars Noriko Hidaka, Chika Sakamoto and Hitoshi Takagi, and tells the story of two young daughters (Hidaka and Sakamoto) of a professor and their interactions with friendly wood spirits in postwar rural Japan. The film won the Animage Anime Grand Prix prize and the Mainichi Film Award for Best Film in 1988.

The film was released on VHS and laserdisc in the United States by Tokuma Japan Communications' US subsidiary in 1993 with the title My Friend Totoro.
In 1988, Streamline Pictures produced an exclusive dub for use on transpacific flights by Japan Airlines and its Oneworld partners. Troma Films, under their 50th St. Films banner, distributed the dub of the film co-produced by Jerry Beck. It was released on VHS and DVD by Fox Video. Troma's and Fox's rights to this version expired in 2004. The film was re-released by Disney on March 7, 2006 and by Madman on March 15, 2006. It features a new dub cast. This DVD release is the first version of the film in the United States to include both Japanese and English language tracks, as Fox did not have the rights to the Japanese audio track for their version.

After writing and filming Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984) and Castle in the Sky (1986), Hayao Miyazaki began directing My Neighbor Totoro for Studio Ghibli. Miyazaki's production paralleled his colleague Isao Takahata's production of Grave of the Fireflies. Miyazaki's film was financed by executive producer Yasuyoshi Tokuma, and both My Neighbor Totoro and Grave of the Fireflies were released on the same bill in 1988. The dual billing was considered "one of the most moving and remarkable double bills ever offered to a cinema audience".

In 1993, Tokuma Japan Communications' US subsidiary released the first English-language version of My Neighbor Totoro, with the title My Friend Totoro. However, because of his disappointment with the result of the heavily edited English version of Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, Miyazaki would not permit any part of the movie to be edited out, all the names had to be remain the same (with the exception being Catbus), the translation had to be as close to the original Japanese as possible, and no part of the movie could be changed for any reason, cultural or linguistic (which was very common back then) despite creating problems with some English viewers, particularly in explaining the origin of the name "Totoro". It was produced by John Daly and Derek Gibson, with co-producer Jerry Beck, and was available on VHS and laserdisc. This was the only United States home video release of the film from Tokuma (20th Century Fox would release all upcoming English-language releases of the film until Fox and Troma's rights to the film expired in 2004). Disney's English-language version premiered on October 23, 2005; it then appeared at the 2005 Hollywood Film Festival. The Turner Classic Movies cable television network held the television premiere of Disney's new English dub on January 19, 2006, as part of the network's salute to Hayao Miyazaki. (TCM aired the dub as well as the original Japanese with English subtitles.) The Disney version was initially released on DVD on March 7, 2006, but is now out of print. A reissue of Totoro, Castle in the Sky, and Kiki's Delivery Service featuring updated cover art highlighting its Studio Ghibli origins was released on March 2, 2010, coinciding with the US DVD and Blu-ray debut of Ponyo.

My Neighbor Totoro helped bring Japanese animation into the global spotlight, and set its writer-director Hayao Miyazaki on the road to success. The film's central character, Totoro, is as famous among Japanese children as Winnie-the-Pooh is among British ones. The Independent recognized Totoro as one of the greatest cartoon characters, describing the creature, "At once innocent and awe-inspiring, King Totoro captures the innocence and magic of childhood more than any of Miyazaki's other magical creations." The Financial Times recognized the character's appeal, "[Totoro] is more genuinely loved than Mickey Mouse could hope to be in his wildest—not nearly so beautifully illustrated—fantasies."

The environmental journal Ambio described the influence of My Neighbor Totoro, "[It] has served as a powerful force to focus the positive feelings that the Japanese people have for satoyama and traditional village life." The film's central character Totoro was used as a mascot by the Japanese "Totoro Hometown Fund Campaign" to preserve areas of satoyama in the Saitama Prefecture. The fund, started in 1990 after the film's release, held an auction in August 2008 at Pixar Animation Studios to sell over 210 original paintings, illustrations, and sculptures inspired by My Neighbor Totoro. A main-belt asteroid was named 10160 Totoro after the film's central character Totoro.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I feel like I’m abusing the phrase “off the chain”, so let me just say that the bee’s knees dream of being this cool. I decided that, since I had it available, I’d watch the movie before I posted this, and I’m damn glad I did. It’s a really touching and heartfelt movie. It made me remember being a child and seeing things with eyes full of wonder and grandeur. It also made me dread having children of my own, because even in English, the Fanning girls captured the annoying nature of the Japanese track. It's also fun to say the word "Brazzers" after every suggestive shot. Also, no rude jokes referring to the amount of points


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #112 on: September 25, 2013, 08:17:29 PM »
#13 –Kiki's Delivery Service
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Release Date:  1989

Just the Plagarism
Kiki's Delivery Service (魔女の宅急便 Majo no Takkyūbin?, translated "Witch's Delivery Service") is a 1989 Japanese animated fantasy film written, produced and directed by Hayao Miyazaki. It is based on the 1985 novel of the same name by Eiko Kadono, an author of children's literature. The film features the voices of Minami Takayama, Rei Sakuma and Kappei Yamaguchi, and tells the story of a young witch (Takayama) as she spends a year in a town on her own while using her magical abilities to earn her living.

According to Miyazaki, the movie touches on the gulf that exists between independence and reliance in Japanese teenage girls.

The film was released on July 22, 1989, and won the Animage Anime Grand Prix prize. It was the first Studio Ghibli film released under the partnership between The Walt Disney Company and Studio Ghibli; Disney recorded an English dub in 1997, which premiered theatrically in the United States at the Seattle International Film Festival on May 23, 1998. It was released on home video in the U.S. and Canada on September 1, 1998.

The first official English dub of Kiki's Delivery Service was produced by Carl Macek of Streamline Pictures at the request of Tokuma Shoten for Japan Airlines' international flights. Kiki was portrayed by voice actress Lisa Michelson. This dub is only available in the Ghibli Laserdisc Box Set.

Kirsten Dunst voiced Kiki in Disney's 1997 English dub, released in 1998. This dub was also Canadian comedian & actor Phil Hartman's last voice-acting performance (as Jiji) before his death in 1998; the dub is dedicated to his memory. Critics generally praised the dub, though some objected to script changes compared to the original Japanese.

In Spain, Kiki was renamed "Nicky", and the film re-titled Nicky la aprendiz de bruja (Nicky the Apprentice Witch), because in Castilian Spanish, the phonetically similar "quiqui" is commonly used in a slang expression: "echar un quiqui" which means "to have intercourse".

Upon the release of the English dub of Kiki's Delivery Service by Disney which had its theatrical premiere at the Seattle International Film Festival on May 23, 1998. On September 15 1998, it was released to VHS video, becoming the 8th-most-rented title at Blockbuster stores during the first week of its availability. This video release also sold over a million copies. A few weeks later, Disney released another VHS of the movie, this time with the original Japanese soundtrack and with both English and Japanese subtitles. A Laserdisc version of the English dub was also available at this time. The Region 1 DVD was released on August 16, 2005, alongside Spirited Away and Castle in the Sky. It was again reissued on Region 1 DVD in March 2010 along with My Neighbor Totoro and Castle in the Sky as a tribute to the home release of Ponyo. The version of this 2010 release was slightly edited to match the original Japanese version.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I think Ghibli films are all wonderfully designed to use one’s heart strings as a violin. Kiki’s Delivery Service holds fond memories for me, from when before my cousin became a massive douche canoe and was a pretty cool guy. I think it’s a timeless movie, and I love it.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #113 on: September 25, 2013, 08:24:42 PM »
#12 –Danger Mouse
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Release Date:  1981

Just the Plagarism
Danger Mouse is a British children's animated television series which was produced by Cosgrove Hall Films for Thames Television. It features the eponymous Danger Mouse, an English mouse who works as a superhero/secret agent. The show is a loose parody of British spy fiction, particularly James Bond and the Danger Man series starring Patrick McGoohan. The show originally ran in the United Kingdom from 28 September 1981 to 19 March 1992. In the English-language version, the titular hero was voiced by David Jason.

The hero wears an eyepatch and his chest is prominently emblazoned with the initials 'DM'. This causes problems for those translating the series into other languages, where a literal translation of the words 'Danger' and 'Mouse' do not have those initials; the Scots Gaelic version, for example, calls the series (and the lead) Donnie Murdo (two given names unconnected either with mice or danger). He was Dzielna Mysz (brave mouse) in Polish, Dundermusen (Thundermouse) in Swedish, and Dare Dare Motus in French, "Dare Dare" being French slang for "as fast as possible". The Slovene translation omitted the DM initials entirely, however, dubbing Danger Mouse Hrabri mišek ('Brave Mouse').

By 1983, Danger Mouse viewing figures hit all-time high of 21.59 million viewers. Danger Mouse was the first British cartoon to break into the American TV market (since the animated shorts Simon in the Land of Chalk Drawings, Ludwig, and Paddington Bear being shown in the 1970s) following syndication on 4 June 1984, where, it garnered a tremendous fan following that still exists. Since it went off air, it has been periodically repeated and been released on DVD. In the United States, it was broadcast on Nickelodeon in the 1980s in the late afternoons and in the early evenings as a segue into prime-time hours (as the A&E Network and later Nick-at-Nite) as the series appealed to both pre-teens and adults with its quick-witted English humour.

FremantleMedia released six Region 0 in 2001-2003, featuring 6-8 random episodes in each set. In September 2006, Fremantle Media released a further six DVDs and a 12 Disc DVD box set. The 25th Anniversary DVD set has all 161 episodes but some were originally aired in five-minute segments, so these have been edited together to make a total of 89 episodes. This means much of David Jason's 'cliffhanger' narration is not present on the DVDs. Although, the box set has received mostly positive reviews some cited the lack of chronological order of the episodes as a disappointment. A 10-disc 30th Anniversary Edition box set was released on 26 September 2011 with the episodes in broadcast order.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I don’t like mice, generally, so this one’s a no go with me. There are some exceptions, but this show isn’t one of them.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #114 on: September 25, 2013, 08:34:48 PM »
#11 –Akira
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Release Date:  1988

Just the Plagarism
Akira is a 1988 Japanese animated cyberpunk action film directed by Katsuhiro Otomo, written by Otomo and Izo Hashimoto, and featuring the voices of Mitsuo Iwata, Nozomu Sasaki, Mami Koyama, and Taro Ishida. The screenplay is based on Otomo's manga Akira, focusing mainly on the first half of the story.

The film depicts a dystopian version of Tokyo in the year 2019, with cyberpunk tones. The plot focuses on teenage biker Tetsuo Shima and his psychic powers, and the leader of his biker gang, Shotaro Kaneda. Kaneda tries to prevent Tetsuo from releasing the imprisoned psychic Akira. While most of the character designs and settings were adapted from the original 2182-page manga epic, the restructured plot of the movie differs considerably from the print version, pruning much of the last half of the manga.

The film became a hugely popular cult film and is widely considered to be a landmark in Japanese animation.

Akira was released by Toho on July 16, 1988. The film set attendance records for an animated film in Japan. Fledgling North American distribution company Streamline Pictures soon acquired an existing English-language rendition created by Kodansha (originally dubbed for the Hong Kong market) which saw limited release in North American theaters from late 1988 throughout 1989. Streamline is reported to have become the film's distributor when both George Lucas and Steven Spielberg labelled it unmarketable in the U.S. In the UK, Akira was theatrically released by ICA Projects on January 25, 1991 and will be re released on July 13, 2013. In Australia, Akira was theatrically released by Island World Communications and distributed by Satellite Entertainment, later on by Manga Entertainment, then Madman Entertainment after Manga Entertainment's Australia branch merged with Madman. In Canada, the Streamline dub was released by Lionsgate (at the time known as C/FP Distribution) in 1990. In 2001, Pioneer released a new dub which was produced by Animaze and was presented in select theaters from March through December 2001.

Roger Ebert selected Akira as his "Video Pick of the Week" in 1989 on Siskel & Ebert and the Movies. For its wider 2001 release, he gave the film "Thumbs Up." As of September 2013, the film has a 87% "fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes. The title has been regarded as one of the greatest animated movies of all time and prompted an increase in popularity of anime movies in the US and, generally, outside of Japan. It is still admired for its exceptional visuals. In Channel 4's 2005 poll of the 100 greatest cartoons of all time featuring both cartoon shows and cartoon movies, Akira came in at number 16. On Empire magazine's list of the 500 greatest movies of all time, Akira is number 440. It showed again on Empire's list of The 100 Best Films Of World Cinema, coming in at #51. IGN also named it 14th on its list of Top 25 Animated Movies of All-Time.

Akira is regarded by many critics as a landmark anime film, one that influenced much of the art in the anime world that followed its release with many illustrators in the manga industry citing the film as an important influence. The film led the way for the growth of popularity of anime outside of Japan. Akira is considered a forerunner of the second wave of anime fandom that began in the early 1990s and has gained a massive cult following since then. Akira has also been cited as a major influence on live-action films ranging from The Matrix to Chronicle.

The Akira anime also made TIME magazine's list of top 5 anime DVDs. The film also made number 16 on Time Out's top 50 animated movie list and number 5 on Total Film's Top 50 Animated Films list. Wizard magazine also listed the film as #5 on their list of the greatest anime.

Quantum Vagina’s take - I’ve only seen this movie once, at a crowded movie night with a bunch of people who also hadn’t seen it before, but didn’t care and preferred to be incredibly annoying by talking through the whole movie, so my recollection of it is sketchy, but it seemed like it was a REALLY good movie, and I plan on watching it again, without people around me who won’t shut up about really annoying things.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #115 on: September 25, 2013, 08:36:40 PM »
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And that'll be it for tonight! The top ten will be posted tomorrow, probably in sections of 5.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2013, 06:20:57 PM by Quantum Vagina »


Johnny Unusual

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #116 on: September 25, 2013, 08:44:50 PM »
I know I've seen Danger Mouse, but I barely remember it.  It never played in Canada and I only caught it (and Bananaman) when I was living in Australia for two months.

Akira probably would have been higher if it was a little more clear.  In trying to include all of the stuff from the comic (except the latter half) in becomes hard to decipher in spots.  But it has some of the most gorgeous animation ever (all hand drawn and apparently pretty much every animation studio was working on it at one point), incredible music and fantastic and horrific imagery (poor Tetsuo's transformation at the end is disgusting, scary and tragic).  Still, for story, I prefer the original manga, which is a lot easier to digest and also has a lot more humour, that the movie was missing.


Offline RoninFox

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #117 on: September 25, 2013, 09:32:51 PM »
Also, I'm sure I'm alone on this, but I would love to see a live action adaptation of the Last Unicorn.  Christopher Lee can reprise his role (and time has made him even more fitting for it) and you can get someone like Terry Gilliam who is great at mixing the darkness and whimsy so well.  Or maybe Guillermo del Toro.  Despite not really caring for Pacific Rim, I think his style would be really suited for it.

Christopher Lee is by far my favourite thing about the Last Unicorn.  He is fucking amazing as the lead villain and imbues him with a lot of pathos where it could have been a one note villain with a bad childhood.  I guess that's another thing that dissappointed me about it: I felt that I wished the movie dived more into the idea of subverted archetypes.  Haggard gets a lot of good stuff: he's a dark evil lord, but he's barely ruling over everyone and he doesn't have a big plan: he's just letting himself rot in a creepy "house of Usher" type castle while enjoying his unicorns.  But I wish more time and care was spent on his knightly son, who clearly wants to be a good heroic knight character but clearly doesn't have a lot to do.  We don't nearly spend enough time with him.  Or Molly Grue, who seems like a maiden who was supposed to be a fairy tale hero but life didn't go well.  She gets a few really good scenes, but the film doesn't feel entirely cohesive in this regard.

You should really read the original novel.  The entire concept of the book is basically to explore exactly what you are asking for.  The fact that its a piece of satire on the fantasy genre gets lost a little in the translation to film.  Also, if you get one of the later editions theres a small sequel coda to the story and some interesting info on the making of the movie at the end.
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Johnny Unusual

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #118 on: September 25, 2013, 10:26:06 PM »
Yeah, I'll definitely have to check it out.


Offline goflyblind

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #119 on: September 26, 2013, 04:12:21 AM »
I know I've seen Danger Mouse, but I barely remember it.  It never played in Canada...

weird. i saw it all the time, but that may have been on a washington station.
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