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Author Topic: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's  (Read 30984 times)

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Offline CJones

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #75 on: September 20, 2013, 04:37:14 PM »
I really should have included Count Duckula. Though to be honest I only remember the intro.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #76 on: September 23, 2013, 06:02:39 PM »
I hope QV will be ready to continue soon.

Until then, more toy commercials.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/hI742WyP76M" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/hI742WyP76M</a>
« Last Edit: September 23, 2013, 06:43:16 PM by Johnny Unusual »


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #77 on: September 24, 2013, 01:30:48 PM »
I'm going to hit up the dog park this afternoon, which should give me enough energy to get through another round of posting tonight.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #78 on: September 24, 2013, 05:06:57 PM »
#24 –Disney’s Adventures of the Gummi Bears
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Game of Thrones… with bears.
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Release Date:  1985

Just the Plagarism
Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears is a Disney animated television series that first aired in the United States in the mid-1980s through the early 1990s. The series was the first animated production by Walt Disney Animation Television, and loosely inspired by the gummi bear candies; Disney CEO Michael Eisner was struck with inspiration for the show when his son requested the candies one day. The series premiered on NBC on September 14, 1985, and aired there for four seasons. The series moved to ABC for one season from 1989 to 1990, and concluded on September 6, 1991 as part of the Disney Afternoon television syndication package. Of the series' 65 shows, 30 were double-features, consisting of two 11-minute cartoons, thereby bringing the series total to 94 distinct episodes overall. The show is well-remembered for its theme music, written by Michael and Patty Silversher and creation of "gummiberry juice" which was a topic of magic potion, gaining abilities to defend them against the foes.

The series was later rebroadcast on the syndicated Disney Afternoon block, and rerun on the Disney Afternoon through the summer of 1991. In later years, it was shown on the Disney Channel and Toon Disney, with its most recent televised airing occurring on Toon Disney on December 28, 2001. Seasons 1 to 3 of the series were released on DVD on November 14, 2006.

Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears was Disney's first major serialized animated television series (it was released back to back with another show, The Wuzzles, which lasted only 13 episodes), and is often credited by animators and animation historians as having helped jump start the television animation boom of the late 1980s and 1990s. Consequently, it also became the forerunner to Disney's famous Disney Afternoon timeslot, which gave way to other famous serialized Disney television series, such as Darkwing Duck, DuckTales, Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers, Goof Troop, Bonkers, TaleSpin and Gargoyles. Although many of these subsequently-created shows exceeded Gummi Bears in budget and length, it is often credited as the sort of prototype to all of the subsequent animation which followed it.

The show was so successful in the United Kingdom that the episodes A New Beginning and Faster than a Speeding Tummi were released as theatrical featurettes there in 1986 and 1987.

Other appearances of Gummi Bears in other media included one appearance of Gruffi Gummi starring in a D-TV music video of the Elvis Presley song "Teddy Bear" in 1986. The show's popularity also led to a re-theming of Disneyland's Motor Boat Cruise, along with a small part of Disneyland that became known as "Disney Afternoon Avenue." The Motor Boat Cruise became the "Motor Boat Cruise to Gummi Glen" and plywood characters from the show made Gummiberry Juice along the waterway. The Gummi Bears, and on occasion human characters such as Duke Igthorn, Princess Calla, or King Gregor, have also been featured as meetable characters who greet guests in Disney theme parks.

Quantum Vagina’s take - This show is pretty damned cool, when you think about what it is. Not only is it a fantasy story with a deep world, it was Disney’s first push into the television animation community, which raised the hell out of a bar that had been low since Hanna/Barbara put neckties on animals. This show gets a thumbs up from me.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #79 on: September 24, 2013, 05:17:47 PM »
#23 –Laputa:Castle in the Sky
(51 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Rainbow Dash
Prepare your Ghiblits.
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Release Date:  1986

Just the Plagarism
Laputa: Castle in the Sky (天空の城ラピュタ Tenkū no Shiro Rapyuta?) (or simply Laputa) (re-titled Castle in the Sky for release in the United States) is a 1986 animated adventure feature film written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki. It is the first film produced and released by Studio Ghibli. The film was distributed by Toei Kabushiki Kaisha. Laputa: Castle in the Sky won the Animage Anime Grand Prix in 1986.

The name 'Laputa' is derived from Jonathan Swift's novel Gulliver's Travels, wherein Swift's Laputa is also a flying island that may be controlled by its citizens. Anthony Lioi feels that Miyazaki's Laputa: Castle in the Sky is similar to Swift's Laputa, where the technological superiority of the castle in the sky is used for political ends.

Laputa is credited by Colonel Muska with having informed Biblical and Hindu legends — thus tying the world of Laputa to our Earth (and to western European civilization) — as do the medieval castle architecture on the ground; the Gothic and half-timbered buildings in the village near the fort; the Welsh mining-town architecture, clothing, and ground vehicles of Pazu's homeland; and the Victorian ambiance of the pirate ship. The anime also makes references to the Hindu epic Ramayana, including "Indra's arrow", while the name Sheeta may be a reference to Sita, the female lead in the Ramayana.

Some of the architecture seen in the film was inspired by a Welsh mining town. Miyazaki first visited Wales in 1984 and witnessed the miners' strike firsthand. He returned to the country in 1986 to prepare for Laputa, which he said reflected his Welsh experience: "I was in Wales just after the miners' strike. I really admired the way the miners' unions fought to the very end for their jobs and communities, and I wanted to reflect the strength of those communities in my film." Miyazaki told The Guardian, "I admired those men, I admired the way they battled to save their way of life, just as the coal miners in Japan did. Many people of my generation see the miners as a symbol; a dying breed of fighting men. Now they are gone."

In the late 1980s, an English version of Laputa was briefly shown in the US by Streamline Pictures. This dub, produced for showing on international flights to Japan, was not produced by Streamline. According to Fred Patten of Streamline, "Streamline Pictures theatrically distributed an English-dubbed print of Laputa from March 24, 1989 for the next year, but Streamline never dubbed it. Streamline licensed Laputa from Tokuma Shoten in late 1988 or early 1989, and was sent a print from Japan that had already been dubbed into English for use as an in-flight film by Japan Air Lines on its trans-Pacific flights. "We have no idea who actually dubbed it." Reportedly, Carl Macek was disappointed with this early dub, which is available only on the Japanese DVD release.

The Disney-produced English dub was recorded in 1998 and planned for release on video in 1999, but Disney eventually decided to release it to theaters instead.

After Princess Mononoke flopped financially in the US, Laputa's release date was pushed back yet again; on occasion the completed dub was screened at select children's festivals. The film was finally released on DVD and video in the US on August 16, 2005 alongside Kiki's Delivery Service and Spirited Away. As with Mononoke and Kiki, critical opinion was mixed about the new dub, but Cloris Leachman and Mark Hamill's performances as Dola and Muska drew praise. Laputa was the second-best selling DVD from Studio Ghibli distributed by Disney in the year of its release (after Spirited Away and ahead of Kiki's Delivery Service). Laputa was reissued on American home video in March 2010 as a tribute accompanying the home video release of Ponyo. The film was released on Blu-ray in North America on May 22, 2012, alongside Whisper of the Heart and The Secret World of Arrietty.

The film currently holds a 94% "Fresh" rating at Rotten Tomatoes. In an audience poll (with 80,402 voters) of 100 best animations of all time, conducted by Japan's Agency for Cultural Affairs in 2007, Castle in the Sky was the second highest-ranked animated film, and third highest-ranked animation overall on the list.

Quantum Vagina’s take - This movie is friggin’ amazing. I need to watch it again.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #80 on: September 24, 2013, 05:24:37 PM »
#22 –The Smurfs
(51 Points) 4 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Mrs. Dick Courier
Too bad they didn’t make a major motion picture.
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Release Date:  1981

Just the Plagarism
The Smurfs (also known as simply Smurfs, and syndicated as Smurfs' Adventures) is an American-Belgian animated fantasy-comedy television series that aired on NBC from September 12, 1981, to December 2, 1989. Made by Hanna-Barbera, it is based on the Belgian comic series by the same name, created by Belgian cartoonist Peyo (who also served as Story Supervisor of this adaptation) and aired for 256 episodes with a total of 418 stories, excluding three cliffhanger episodes and six specials.

In 1976, Stuart R. Ross, an American media and entertainment entrepreneur who saw the Smurfs while traveling in Belgium, entered into an agreement with Editions Dupuis and Peyo, acquiring North American and other rights to the characters, whose original name was "les Schtroumpfs". Subsequently, Ross launched the Smurfs in the United States in association with a California company, Wallace Berrie and Co., whose figurines, dolls and other Smurf merchandise became a hugely popular success. NBC president Fred Silverman's daughter, Melissa, had a Smurf doll of her own that he had bought for her at a toy shop while they were visiting Aspen, Colorado. Silverman thought that a series based on the Smurfs might make a good addition to his Saturday-morning lineup.

The series currently airs on Boomerang. The episodes were edited by Hanna-Barbera in 1987 into a half-hour syndicated version called Smurfs' Adventures; 26 episodes of this series aired as part of DiC's E/I-compliant children's programming block for broadcast stations in the early 2000s. The series is still being shown regularly on many channels throughout the world.

The cartoon was formerly distributed by Worldvision Enterprises (now CBS Television Distribution). The cartoon is now distributed by Warner Bros. Television Distribution; Time Warner is the current owner of all Hanna-Barbera properties, having inherited them in their 1996 merger with Turner Broadcasting. Some episodes are available through the online video service In2TV.

Quantum Vagina’s take - Eh, I’ve never really been a huge fan of The Smurfs. I guess they’re mildly interesting, and kind of fun, but meh. Also, Smurfette has every STD ever. It’s canon.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #81 on: September 24, 2013, 05:41:13 PM »
From what I heard, the original Smurfs comics are actually quite good.  The tone is still largely the same, but there is darker undercurrents.  I read a book about 1001 comic to read before you die, and a really interesting one is a political comedy (no, really) called King Smurf, in which Papa leaves a smurf in charge who basically gets corrupt.  Nothing really nasty happens, it's more that the power goes to his head and there's various changes of power before Papa Smurf comes back.

Also, there's (and I'm not even kidding) a zombie smurf story before zombies were even a thing (at least in the modern definition).  Published in 1959, The Black Smurfs (later changed to purple for... obvious reason) is about Smurfs turning black and become mindless jerks who bite people to make them Black Smurfs, until Papa Smurf finds the cure.

But yeah, not an interesting cartoon, in my opinion.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2013, 05:42:57 PM by Johnny Unusual »


Offline Nunyerbiz

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #82 on: September 24, 2013, 05:50:38 PM »
My only memory of the Gummi Bears cartoon is the theme song... I was 11 years old when it came out and I can remember myself and a friend just laughing hysterically at the combination of the theme song and the bouncing bears. Even to us at that young age, having already seen so many ridiculous concepts for Saturday morning cartoons... this one seemed even more ridiculous. I'm sure I watched full episodes, as there wasn't much else to do back then on wintery Saturday mornings... but the show will always just be the theme song.... which I still find myself signing every now and again.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #83 on: September 24, 2013, 05:53:51 PM »
#21 –ThunderCats
(52 Points) 6 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Quantum Vagina
HOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!
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Release Date:  1985

Just the Plagarism
ThunderCats is an American/Japanese animation based on a group of cat-like humanoid aliens. The show was created by Tobin "Ted" Wolf and animated by Japanese animation studio, Pacific Animation Corporation. The characters were originally featured in an animated TV series named ThunderCats, running from 1985 to 1989.

The original show was animated in Japan while being produced, written and voice-acted in the United States. Many of the artists went on to be in Studio Ghibli, and worked on [Hayao] Miyazaki's first film, so "ThunderCats" does have a footprint in Japanese animation. The series was originally distributed by Rankin-Bass Productions' then-parent company Telepictures Corporation, which would later merge with Lorimar Productions in 1986. In 1989, Lorimar-Telepictures was purchased by and folded into Warner Bros., whose television syndication arm would eventually assume distribution of the show; Warner Bros. has had the rights to the series (and all Lorimar-Telepictures programming) from that point on.

There were also several comic book series produced. A ThunderCats comic book series based on the animated series was originally published by Marvel Comics (currently owned by Warner Bros. rival Disney) through its Star Comics imprint in 1985, lasting for 3 years and 24 issues. During this time, a new series was published by Marvel UK consisting of 129 issues and was also published for three years. Beginning in 2002 ThunderCats titles were published by Wildstorm Productions, an imprint of DC Comics (Warner Bros.' corporate sibling), and included 5 non-canon mini-series and several one-shots. A side-scrolling video game based on the series, ThunderCats: The Lost Eye of Thundera, was published in 1987.
Items of clothing featuring the ThunderCats logo and DVD boxsets of the original series enjoyed a resurgence in the mid-to-late 2000s as nostalgia for the former children's favorite grew. It was announced on June 7, 2007, that Aurelio Jaro is making a CGI-animated feature film of ThunderCats, based on a script written by Paul Sopocy. In October 2007, Variety magazine revealed that Jerry O'Flaherty, veteran video game art director, had signed on to direct. The film is being produced by Spring Creek Productions. It was originally set for a summer 2010 release, but it has since been reported that the movie is on hold. Concept art for the film has also been leaked online.

Quantum Vagina’s take - This show is off the CHAIN. It’s got EVERYTHING. Swords. Lasers. Mummies. Furries. EVERY. FUCKING. THING. IN. THIS. SHOW. Except Snarf. No. Even Snarf. Awesome. Pure awesome.


Quantum Vagina

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #84 on: September 24, 2013, 05:56:55 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/iH8au4ckD0Y" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/iH8au4ckD0Y</a>

That'll do me for now. I'm on an energy headache. I'll probably post 20-11 later tonight, and get onto the top 10 tomorrow. Probably, providing no unexpected happenings.


Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #85 on: September 24, 2013, 06:17:28 PM »
#23 –Laputa:Castle in the Sky
(51 Points) 3 of 13 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Rainbow Dash
Prepare your Ghiblits.
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/McM0_YHDm5A" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/McM0_YHDm5A</a>
Release Date:  1986

Just the Plagarism
Laputa: Castle in the Sky (天空の城ラピュタ Tenkū no Shiro Rapyuta?) (or simply Laputa) (re-titled Castle in the Sky for release in the United States) is a 1986 animated adventure feature film written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki. It is the first film produced and released by Studio Ghibli. The film was distributed by Toei Kabushiki Kaisha. Laputa: Castle in the Sky won the Animage Anime Grand Prix in 1986.

The name 'Laputa' is derived from Jonathan Swift's novel Gulliver's Travels, wherein Swift's Laputa is also a flying island that may be controlled by its citizens. Anthony Lioi feels that Miyazaki's Laputa: Castle in the Sky is similar to Swift's Laputa, where the technological superiority of the castle in the sky is used for political ends.

Laputa is credited by Colonel Muska with having informed Biblical and Hindu legends — thus tying the world of Laputa to our Earth (and to western European civilization) — as do the medieval castle architecture on the ground; the Gothic and half-timbered buildings in the village near the fort; the Welsh mining-town architecture, clothing, and ground vehicles of Pazu's homeland; and the Victorian ambiance of the pirate ship. The anime also makes references to the Hindu epic Ramayana, including "Indra's arrow", while the name Sheeta may be a reference to Sita, the female lead in the Ramayana.

Some of the architecture seen in the film was inspired by a Welsh mining town. Miyazaki first visited Wales in 1984 and witnessed the miners' strike firsthand. He returned to the country in 1986 to prepare for Laputa, which he said reflected his Welsh experience: "I was in Wales just after the miners' strike. I really admired the way the miners' unions fought to the very end for their jobs and communities, and I wanted to reflect the strength of those communities in my film." Miyazaki told The Guardian, "I admired those men, I admired the way they battled to save their way of life, just as the coal miners in Japan did. Many people of my generation see the miners as a symbol; a dying breed of fighting men. Now they are gone."

In the late 1980s, an English version of Laputa was briefly shown in the US by Streamline Pictures. This dub, produced for showing on international flights to Japan, was not produced by Streamline. According to Fred Patten of Streamline, "Streamline Pictures theatrically distributed an English-dubbed print of Laputa from March 24, 1989 for the next year, but Streamline never dubbed it. Streamline licensed Laputa from Tokuma Shoten in late 1988 or early 1989, and was sent a print from Japan that had already been dubbed into English for use as an in-flight film by Japan Air Lines on its trans-Pacific flights. "We have no idea who actually dubbed it." Reportedly, Carl Macek was disappointed with this early dub, which is available only on the Japanese DVD release.

The Disney-produced English dub was recorded in 1998 and planned for release on video in 1999, but Disney eventually decided to release it to theaters instead.

After Princess Mononoke flopped financially in the US, Laputa's release date was pushed back yet again; on occasion the completed dub was screened at select children's festivals. The film was finally released on DVD and video in the US on August 16, 2005 alongside Kiki's Delivery Service and Spirited Away. As with Mononoke and Kiki, critical opinion was mixed about the new dub, but Cloris Leachman and Mark Hamill's performances as Dola and Muska drew praise. Laputa was the second-best selling DVD from Studio Ghibli distributed by Disney in the year of its release (after Spirited Away and ahead of Kiki's Delivery Service). Laputa was reissued on American home video in March 2010 as a tribute accompanying the home video release of Ponyo. The film was released on Blu-ray in North America on May 22, 2012, alongside Whisper of the Heart and The Secret World of Arrietty.

The film currently holds a 94% "Fresh" rating at Rotten Tomatoes. In an audience poll (with 80,402 voters) of 100 best animations of all time, conducted by Japan's Agency for Cultural Affairs in 2007, Castle in the Sky was the second highest-ranked animated film, and third highest-ranked animation overall on the list.

Quantum Vagina’s take - This movie is friggin’ amazing. I need to watch it again.
The bit with the robot and the flowers makes me tear up every time.


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #86 on: September 24, 2013, 06:48:09 PM »
I really need to see Laputa.

Thundercats is really not that good.  The animation is pretty weak.  But it has a hell of an opening that makes it WAY more amazing.

Fun fact:

The theme of Thundercats was written by James Lipton.  I'm told Mumm-Ra smells like apples.


Offline Rainbow Dash

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #87 on: September 24, 2013, 08:29:47 PM »
Laputa set a Twitter record for Tweets per second last month when they did the annual airing in Japan and people tweeted "Balus" when the two characters say it in the film.


Offline Nunyerbiz

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #88 on: September 25, 2013, 08:46:40 AM »
Thundercats was indeed awful... Still watched the hell out of it, as that's just what you did in November after walking home from school, you watched horrid shit like Thundercats and Voltron.

I did really love Robotech as a kid... Even though I would get confused as hell when the story jumped to a completely different plot line with completely different characters. It wasn't until the dawn of the internets that I learned about how it was cobbled together from disparate source material. Still, it was the show probably most responsible for making me realize that girls weren't icky... In whatever plot line involved the love triangle between the hot shot pilot guy, the other military woman and the singer... Rick and Lisa and.... I'm drawing a blank on the name of the singer. But yea, I can remember almost being embarrassed to be caught up in a love triangle. The show aired really early in the morning in Detroit, like 6:30 or something ridiculous. I would have my mom wake me up as she was getting ready for work so I could watch it... and she'd tease me about liking "All My Children with Robots"... which is how she had rechristened the series.


Offline Tripe

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Re: LOC 74- Top 50 Cartoons of the 80's
« Reply #89 on: September 25, 2013, 09:09:44 AM »
That's Macross right?