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Author Topic: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s  (Read 28217 times)

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Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #105 on: August 16, 2013, 02:28:28 AM »
#6–Final Fantasy VII

(100 Points) 7 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #1 – Thrifty Version II
If everything's a dream, don't wake me.

Release Date:  January 31, 1997

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Final Fantasy VII is a role-playing video game developed by Square (now Square Enix) as the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. It was released in 1997 for the Sony PlayStation.
 
Final Fantasy VII follows protagonist Cloud Strife, a mercenary who initially joins the eco-terrorist rebel organization AVALANCHE to stop the world-controlling megacorporation Shinra from draining the life of the planet for use as an energy source. As the story progresses, Cloud and his allies become involved in a larger world-threatening conflict, facing off against Sephiroth, the game's main antagonist.
 
Development of Final Fantasy VII began in 1994. The game was originally intended for release on the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, but was moved to the Nintendo 64. However, since the Nintendo 64's cartridges lacked the required storage capacity, Square decided to release the game for the CD-ROM based PlayStation instead. Final Fantasy VII was produced by Hironobu Sakaguchi and directed by Yoshinori Kitase. The music was composed by Final Fantasy veteran Nobuo Uematsu, while the series' long-time character designer, Yoshitaka Amano, was replaced by Tetsuya Nomura.
 
Helped by a large pre-release promotional campaign, Final Fantasy VII became an immediate critical and commercial success. It has continued to sell solidly—10 million copies were sold by May 2010, making it the best-selling title in the series. Final Fantasy VII was praised for its graphics, gameplay, music and story. Criticism primarily pertained to its English localization. It has retrospectively been acknowledged as the game that popularized the Japanese role-playing video game style outside of its home market, and has frequently ranked highly on various top game lists. The popularity of the title led Square Enix to produce a series of prequels and sequels for different platforms under the collective title Compilation of Final Fantasy VII.

The game's setting is similar to that of Final Fantasy VI insofar as it is a world with considerably more advanced technology than the first five games in the series. Overall, the game's technology and society approximates that of an industrial or post-industrial science fiction milieu. The world of Final Fantasy VII, referred to in the game as "The Planet", but retroactively named "Gaia", is composed of three main land masses. The eastern continent is home to the city of Midgar, an industrial metropolis that serves as the capital city and hosts the headquarters of the Shinra Electric Power Company, which operates as the planet's de facto world government. Other locations on the eastern continent are Junon (Shinra's major military base), Fort Condor (a fort with a huge condor covering up a Mako reactor on top of it), a chocobo ranch, and Kalm (a small town inspired by medieval Europe).
 
The western continent features the Gold Saucer (an amusement park with Corel Prison below), Costa Del Sol (a seaside resort), Gongaga (a small town containing the remains of a destroyed Mako reactor), Nibelheim (a town residing at the base of Mt. Nibel), Rocket Town (the location of Shinra's failed space rocket launch), and Cosmo Canyon. The tribe inhabiting Cosmo Canyon emphasize living in harmony with nature and dedicating themselves to the planet's well-being. Their settlement features an observatory and serves as a research facility for those who wish to participate in a philosophy known as the "Study of Planet Life", a lifestyle that encourages deference for nature and teaches that the planet has a life and energy of its own.
 
Wutai, a village inspired by pre-modern Japan and China, is located on a large island off the western continent. The northernmost continent is a heavily glaciated landmass, and its few settlements include Bone Village (an excavation site), Icicle Inn (a ski resort town), the mythical "City of the Ancients", and the Northern Crater, where the game's climax takes place. There are also underwater locations accessible only by submarine; for example, a sunken Shinra plane transporter.

Pak's Thoughts – It’s not my favorite Final Fantasy, but the entire world fell in love with this game, so who am I to argue? It has some great moments and all of that delicious Final Fantasy melodrama, but I could never sink my teeth into it. I did like to torment my brother when he was playing through the final battle with my own lyrics to the awesome operatic song. “Very, very, very cross! Sephiroth! He’s the boss…”

Couldn’t make it through the whole top 10 tonight, and tomorrow (Well, today, now) is Tyrant and my 10 year anniversary!  (WOO!) Sooo, I don’t know if I’ll have a chance to post up the top 5 today. If I don’t, I’ll totally get it in on Saturday!


Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #106 on: August 16, 2013, 02:49:42 AM »
No worries.  I really like Final Fantasy VII, but I don't love it as much as others.  I much prefer Kefka's bat-shit insanity and evil to Sephiroth's generic and uninteresting pretty boy villain (not to say that being a pretty boy makes you a bad villain, but it felt like he was trying to hard to be cool while not really being much of anything).  Still, the play mechanics where really fun and the overall world was interesting.  I think VII and X did a better job at mixing the fantasy with the high tech, but this game was nothing to sneeze at.

FF VI was just so... big.  Just epically big, with lots of great characters and a crazy number of different, unique adventures.  I also appreciate how bleak the game was willing to go with the beginning of the second half.  It's a game I never was able to finish.  I was always able to get to the last boss but something always came up and made me too busy to finish the job (in a way, just collecting all of the characters again is a reward unto itself).

Mario 64 was an amazing game.  Very few franchises were able to make the transition from platformer to "3d" with such success.  There were games that looked better, but few that played so good.

Never played Monkey Island.  I really got to get around to that.


Offline Rainbow Dash

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #107 on: August 16, 2013, 07:58:11 AM »
FFVII was the start of the end for the series for me.  I still got a good bit of enjoyment out of it, but I really disliked the march from Fantasy to Sci Fi.  I didn't find the characters nearly as enjoyable as 6.  9 was by far my favorite of the PSX Final Fantasy games.  Not only was it a return to Fantasy, but the cast was amazing.  Certainly helps when the main character isn't some brooding emo-kid.


Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #108 on: August 16, 2013, 08:08:30 AM »
Yeah, I never gave a darn (pardon my language) about Cloud.  Sci-Fi was less of a problem for me and the game is fun, but for all it's strengths, it had a lot of things that didn't work for me.  That said, still a good game and very high on my list, but I think I appreciate it much more technically than for the story.  I think VII was a signifier, but I never looked back after FF X (actually, I played FF X-II, but let's face it, it wasn't worth remembering.  At all.)

BTW, looking at my list, I feel confident I can predict the top 5, but I can't begin to guess the order.  They could appear in any order.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2013, 08:13:28 AM by Johnny Unusual »


Offline Thrifty Version II

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #109 on: August 16, 2013, 08:36:08 AM »
I've heard of most of the stuff on the list, even if I never played them.  There's a lot of entries I did play, but forgot about them.  I mostly forgot about PC games.

Final Fantasy 7 was the first Final Fantasy I ever played.  I haven't touched most of them; 7 and 9 were the only ones I played through.  8 and 10 I tried.  11 (the MMORPG) I've played on and off for 9 years.  14 (the newer MMORPG) I tried for 2 days but it was awful.

I loved the Enemy Skill materia.  I hated the glitch that Zombie Dragon would only ever cast Pandora's Box once.  About a year ago, I had a lot of time to kill so I played through for hours and hours on emulated copy and I think I got 5 Master Magic, Command, and Summon materia.  I can just spend days down there in the final dungeon grinding for AP against those magic pots and bouncy-ball thingies.


Offline Mrs. Dick Courier

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #110 on: August 16, 2013, 01:02:13 PM »
Nothing before or since can beat Mario for 64 in my opinion.

Nothing.  Its still awesome.
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Offline Thrifty Version II

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #111 on: August 16, 2013, 02:12:29 PM »
I think Mario 64 was on my list.  I liked Super Mario Sunshine better, but it came out in 2002 so it doesn't count.


Offline Relaxing Dragon

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #112 on: August 16, 2013, 03:29:10 PM »
Hard to top Mario 64 in my book (although I love Super Mario Sunshine something fierce as well). Was one of the first games I ever got, and I remember being in a constant competition with my little brother as to who could get the most stars first (I don't think I managed to beat the final Bowser before him though, blast it all. Stupid star platform...). I got the re-release when it came out on the DS, and the whole game was still as fun as ever. Just so many levels to get through, and so many stars on each level, not to mention the sheer variety available. I mean, sure, they seem like the stock "lava level, snow level, ghost level, etc.", but damn if they didn't include enough details and changes in each one to keep things fresh. And then they throw in levels like the clock, the rainbow sky, and that one where you could change the water height based on where you jumped into the portrait, and things took another level of crazy. Love it love it love it.


Offline Raven

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #113 on: August 16, 2013, 03:43:09 PM »
Looking over my list there are only 2 that I'm absolutely sure will be in the top 5.  I'm pretty sure I can pick some of the others but they weren't on my list.


Zombie Monty

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #114 on: August 16, 2013, 05:22:56 PM »
I am sad to say that I forgot Day Of The Tentacle.   :(

It would have been my #1 pick for sure.  For some reason I totally spaced out on PC games for my list.


Offline Rainbow Dash

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #115 on: August 16, 2013, 10:39:01 PM »
I'm thinking my #1 is going to end up in the bonus round with 25 points...


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #116 on: August 17, 2013, 08:47:16 PM »
#5–Goldeneye 007

(103 Points) 7 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #3 – Johnny Unusual
Finish the job James - If you can! 

Release Date:  August 23, 1997

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
GoldenEye 007 is a first-person shooter video game developed by Rare and based on the 1995 James Bond film GoldenEye. It was exclusively released for the Nintendo 64 video game console on August 25 1997. The game features a single-player campaign in which players assume the role of British Secret Intelligence Service agent James Bond as he fights to prevent a criminal syndicate from using a satellite weapon against London to cause a global financial meltdown. The game also includes a split-screen multiplayer mode in which two, three or four players can compete in different types of deathmatch games.
 
GoldenEye 007 was originally conceived as an on-rails shooter inspired by Sega's Virtua Cop, before being redesigned as a free-roaming shooter. The game received highly positive reviews from the gaming media and sold over eight million copies worldwide, making it the third-best-selling Nintendo 64 game. GoldenEye 007 is considered an important game in the history of first-person shooters for demonstrating the viability of game consoles as platforms for the genre, and for signalling a transition from the then-standard Doom-like approach to a more realistic style. It pioneered features that have since become common in first-person shooters, such as varied mission objectives, a zoomable sniper rifle, stealth elements, and a console multiplayer deathmatch mode.
GoldenEye 007 is a first-person shooter that features both single and a multiplayer modes. In the single-player mode, the player takes the role of James Bond through a series of free-roaming 3D levels. Each level requires the player to complete a certain set of objectives – such as collecting or destroying specified items, rescuing hostages, or meeting with friendly non-player characters (NPCs) – and then exit the stage. Some gadgets from the James Bond film series are featured in the game and are often used to complete particular mission objectives; for example, in one level the electromagnetic watch from Live and Let Die is used to acquire a jail cell key.

The multiplayer mode allows two, three or four players to compete against each other in five different types of split screen deathmatch games: Normal, You Only Live Twice, The Living Daylights (Flag Tag), The Man With the Golden Gun, and Licence to Kill. Normal is a basic deathmatch mode in which the main objective is to kill opponents as many times as possible. It can be played as a free-for-all game or in teams. In You Only Live Twice, players only have two lives before they are eliminated from the game, and Licence to Kill is a mode in which players die from a single hit with any weapon. In The Man With the Golden Gun, a single Golden Gun, which is capable of killing opponents with only one shot, is placed in a fixed location on the map; once the Golden Gun is picked up, the only way to re-acquire it is to kill the player holding it. The player with the Golden Gun is unable to pick up body armour while opponents can. In The Living Daylights, a "flag" is placed in a fixed location on the map, and the player who holds it the longest wins. The flag-carrier cannot use weapons but can still collect them to keep opponents from stocking ammunition. Aspects of each gametype can be customised, including the chosen map, class of weapons, and winning condition. As players progress through the single player mode, new maps and characters are unlocked in the multiplayer mode.

Pak's Thoughts – I don’t usually enjoy multiplayer first person shooters, and even I spent hours upon hours playing with/against my brothers. I loved getting that laser that let you shoot through walls. It was so satisfying to kill your opponent from one room over. Single player was a lot of fun too. Who doesn’t want to be James Bond?


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #117 on: August 17, 2013, 08:47:39 PM »
 
#4 – Super Mario Bros. 3

(126 Points) 6 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking - #1 - Tyrant

One toot on this whistle will send you to a far away land!

Release Date:  February 12, 1990 (In North America)

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Super Mario Bros. 3, also referred to as Super Mario 3 and SMB3, is a platform video game developed and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), and is the third game in the Super Mario series. The game was released in Japan in 1988, in the United States in 1990, and in Europe in 1991. Development was handled by Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development, led by Shigeru Miyamoto, who directed the game along with Takashi Tezuka.
 
The game centers on the quest of Mario and Luigi to save the rulers of seven kingdoms from Bowser, the series' antagonist. The two brothers must travel across eight worlds to restore order to the Mushroom World. It built on the game play of previous Mario games by introducing new power-ups that augment character abilities, and established conventions that were carried over to future games in the series.
 
Prior to its private consumer North American release, game play footage from Super Mario Bros. 3 appeared in the Universal Studios film The Wizard, which helped fuel the game's anticipation among fans. Upon its release, the game was commercially successful and has since become one of the best-selling video games in the industry. Super Mario Bros. 3 was well received by critics and has been included in numerous lists of top 100 video games. The success of the game resulted in an animated television show based on its elements, and in the game's re-release on later Nintendo consoles.

Super Mario Bros. 3 is a two-dimensional platform game in which the player controls the on-screen protagonist (either Mario or Luigi) from a third-person perspective. The game shares similar game mechanics with previous titles in the series—Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels, and Super Mario Bros. 2—but introduces several new elements. In addition to the running and jumping moves found in past games, the player can fly and float with the aid of special items, slide down slopes, and execute new types of jumps. Super Mario Bros. 3 is set after the events of previous games. Mario and Luigi embark on a mission on behalf of Princess Toadstool to stop Bowser and his children—the Koopalings—from terrorizing the kings of seven regions in the Mushroom World. The Koopalings stole the kings' magic wands and transformed them into animals. Each region serves as a game world that is divided into stage levels, and an eighth region is included as the final world, Dark Land. The eight worlds feature distinct visual themes; for example, the second world, "Desert Land", contains sand-covered levels with pyramids, while the levels in the fourth world, "Giant Land", are populated with obstacles and enemies four times as large as other worlds.

The player navigates through the game via two game screens: an overworld map and a level playfield. The overworld map displays an overhead representation of the current world and has several paths leading from the world's entrance to a castle. Paths connect to action panels, fortresses and other map icons, and allow players to take different routes to reach the world's goal. Moving the on-screen character to an action panel or fortress will allow access to that level's playfield, a linear stage populated with obstacles and enemies. The majority of the game takes place in these levels, with the player traversing the stage by running, jumping, and dodging or defeating enemies.
 
Completing stages allows the player to progress through the overworld map and to succeeding worlds. Each world features a final stage with a boss to defeat; the first seven worlds feature an airship controlled by one of the Koopalings, while the player battles Bowser in his castle in the eighth world. Other map icons include large boulders and locked doors that impede paths, and special minigames that provide the player a chance to obtain special power-ups. A new feature is the player's option to save power-up items obtained in minigames for later use via a menu accessible at the overworld screen.
 
In addition to special items from previous games like the "Super Mushroom" and "Fire Flower", new power-ups are introduced that provide the player with new options. Items vary in scarcity; for example, 1-up mushrooms, which give the player an extra attempt to play after the character dies, are abundant, while the "magic whistle", which enables the player to bypass certain worlds, only appears three times in the game. The "Super Leaf" and "Tanooki Suit" give Mario raccoon and tanuki appearances respectively and allow him to fly for a short period of time. Other suits include the "Frog Suit," which increases the character's underwater speed and agility and improves jumping height on land, and the "Hammer Suit," which gives Mario the appearance of the Hammer Bros. enemy and allows him to throw hammers at enemies and resist fire attacks. Some abilities provided by the suits are intended to give the player more navigation options in stages. For example, the Frog Suit allows the player to access underwater pipes, and the Tanooki Suit can temporarily transform Mario into an invincible statue, reducing the threat of damage. During the game, Mario can find a Warp Whistle, which will take him to a new area of the game. When using the Whistle, the tune played is the exact melody used from the Whistle in The Legend of Zelda.
 
Super Mario Bros. 3 includes a multiplayer option which allows two players to cooperatively play the game by taking turns at navigating the overworld map and accessing stage levels; the first player controls Mario, while the other controls Luigi. Through this mode, players can also access several minigames, including a remake of the original Mario Bros. arcade game.

Pak's Thoughts: The game so awesome, it made the top 5 in 2 different decades! Most of my thoughts about this game can be found in the Games of the ‘80s thread, but I think I’ll add that like many people, I learned how to find the Warp Flute in the first castle from watching The Wizard. So nobody can say that movie never did anything for anyone…


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #118 on: August 17, 2013, 08:47:57 PM »
#3–Street Fighter II

(126 Points) 9 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #1 – Cjones
You must defeat my dragon punch to stand a chance! 

Release Date:  February 6, 1991

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Street Fighter II: The World Warrior is a competitive fighting game originally released for the arcades in 1991. It is the second entry in the Street Fighter series and the arcade sequel to the original Street Fighter released in 1987. It was Capcom's fourteenth title that ran on the CP System arcade hardware. Street Fighter II improved upon the many concepts introduced in the first game, including the use of command-based special moves and a six-button configuration, while offering players a selection of multiple playable characters, each with their own unique fighting style.
 
The success of Street Fighter II is credited for starting the fighting game boom during the 1990s which inspired other game developers to produce their own fighting game franchises, popularizing the genre. Its success led to a sub-series of updated versions (see below), each offering additional features and characters over previous versions, as well as several home versions. In 1993, sales of Street Fighter II exceeded $1.5 billion in gross revenues, and by 1994, the game had been played by at least 25 million Americans in homes and arcades. The video game console ports to the Super NES and Sega Genesis sold more than 14 million copies, and it remains Capcom's best-selling consumer game of all time.

Street Fighter II follows several of the conventions and rules already established by its original 1987 predecessor. The player engages opponents in one-on-one close quarter combat in a series of best-two-out-of-three matches. The objective of each round is to deplete the opponent's vitality before the timer runs out. If both opponents knock each other out at the same time or the timer runs out with both fighters having an equal amount of vitality left, then a "double KO" or "draw game" is declared and additional rounds will be played until sudden death. In the first Street Fighter II, a match could last up to ten rounds if there was no clear winner; this was reduced to four rounds in Champion Edition and onward. If there is no clear winner by the end of the final round, then either the computer-controlled opponent will win by default in a single-player match or both fighters will lose in a 2-player match.
 
After every third match in the single player mode, the player will participate in a "Bonus stage minigame" for additional points. The bonus games includes (in order) a car-breaking event similar to another bonus round featured in Final Fight; a barrel breaking bonus game where the barrels are dropped off from a conveyor belt above the player; and a drum-breaking bonus game where drums are flammable and piled over each other. The bonus games were removed from the arcade version of Super Street Fighter II Turbo (although they are featured in the Game Boy Advance version).
 
Like in the original, the game's controls uses a configuration of an eight-directional joystick and six attack buttons. The player uses the joystick to jump, crouch and move the character towards or away from the opponent, as well as to guard the character from an opponent's attacks. There are three punch buttons and three kick buttons of differing strength and speed (Light, Medium and Heavy). The player can perform a variety of basic moves in any position, including grabbing/throwing attacks, which were not featured in the original Street Fighter. Like in the original, the player can perform special moves by inputting a combination of directional and button-based commands.
 
Street Fighter II differs from its predecessor due to the selection of multiple playable characters, each with distinct fighting styles and special moves. A bug in the game's code enabled the player to "cancel" during the animation of some moves by performing another move, allowing for a combination of several basic and special moves. This "combo" system was later adopted as a standard feature of fighting games, and was expanded upon in subsequent Street Fighter installments.

Street Fighter II was followed by a series of updated versions, each refining the play mechanics, graphics, character roster and other aspects of the game. The first was Street Fighter II: Champion Edition, released for the arcades in 1992, which allowed players to control the four Grand Masters and same character matches. Following the Champion Edition, a wave of bootleg ROM chip upgrades for its arcade cabinets added new gameplay, prompting Capcom's official response with Street Fighter II: Hyper Fighting during the same year, increasing the playing speed and giving some of the characters new special moves. Super Street Fighter II was released in 1993, which marked the change to the more advanced CP System II, allowing for revamped graphics and music, while introducing four new characters. Super Street Fighter II Turbo was released in 1994 and was the last of the Street Fighter II releases for the arcades, which introduced powered-up special moves called Super Combos and added a new hidden character.

Pak's Thoughts – Still one of the best fighters ever made.  I’m the only person I know who can rock it with Dhalsim. The trick is to beat them up as though you were about 3 character lengths forward. Also, that spinny jump kick thing is a life saver.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #119 on: August 17, 2013, 08:48:38 PM »
#2 - Super Mario World

(128 Points) 7 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #1 – Johnny Unusual/Monty
Looks like Bowser is at it again! 

Release Date:  November 21, 1990

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Super Mario World, subtitled Super Mario Bros. 4 for its original Japanese release, is a 1990 platform video game developed and published by Nintendo as a pack-in launch title for the Super Family Computer/Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES), and is the fourth game in the Super Mario series. Development was handled by Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development, led by Shigeru Miyamoto, who directed the game along with Takashi Tezuka.
 
The game centers on the quest of Mario and Luigi to save Dinosaur Land from Bowser, the series' antagonist. The two brothers must travel across seven worlds to restore order to Dinosaur Land. It built on the gameplay of previous Mario games by introducing new power-ups that augment character abilities, and established conventions that were carried over to future games in the series. Super Mario World marked the first appearance of Yoshi, Mario's dinosaur sidekick and riding mount.
 
The game was an overwhelming critical and commercial success, gaining a legacy and selling over 20 million copies worldwide. The game is considered by many to be one of the best and most innovative Mario games ever made.

Super Mario World is a two-dimensional platform game in which the player controls the on-screen protagonist (either Mario or Luigi) from a third-person perspective. The game shares similar gameplay mechanics with previous titles in the series—Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros. 2, and Super Mario Bros. 3—but introduces several new elements. In addition to the running and jumping moves found in past games, the player can float with the aid of special items and execute new types of jumps such as the spin jump.

The new suit in the game is the cape feather, which gives Mario a cape and allows him to fly. This suit is also similar to the Racoon Suit from Super Mario Bros. 3 in terms of gameplay mechanics but with a few alterations: you can now hold the B button to fly when Mario is able to do so, and can glide using the cape as a sail.

Pak's Thoughts – I love this game to death. I don’t even need a strategy guide anymore to complete it at 100%. The crisp graphics were amazing in their day, and still look pretty awesome. The music is some of the best the Mario Series has had to offer (With Mario Sunshine being my favorite Soundtrack, but that’s a game for another list!) Plus the Koopa Kids returned, which are favorites of mine.