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Author Topic: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s  (Read 28059 times)

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Offline Raven

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #90 on: August 14, 2013, 10:37:39 PM »
My best friend and I had to repaint a shed to get the original Sonic the Hedgehog game and that was the longest project of our lives at that point.  Totally worth it though.  Can't tell you how many hours we spent on that game the first week we had it though. 

NBA Jam was just outstanding.  Spent a lot of money in the arcade on that one. 

Battletoads was as hard as everyone remembers. 

I didn't like any of the sequels of Super Mario Kart so this one was clearly my favorite.  Sometimes if my friends and I get together and have Retro gaming nights almost always end up in a Mario Kart tourney. 


Offline Relaxing Dragon

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #91 on: August 14, 2013, 10:57:16 PM »
Ah, Ocorana of Time. Though not my favorite of the Zelda games (that honor belongs to Majora's Mask, which missed the cut here by about a year), it certainly had a strong impact on my gaming career. One of the greatest games ever, for sure, if simply for it's unprecedented scope (for a 3D N64 game). This seemingly enormous world to explore, a grand set of temples, puzzles, action, adventure, RPG elements, sidequests, cool characters and creatures... it was more than my young child self could handle at the time.

Also, I'll be taking the music of this game to the grave (I had the most striking nostalgia rush when I watched Scott Pilgrim and they play some of the music over the dream sequence. Like Edgar Wright said, they were nursery rhymes for a generation).


Offline CJones

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #92 on: August 14, 2013, 11:38:55 PM »
I fucking loved Battletoads. I had it at number 4. One spot behind Monty. Yes it is hard as nails, but I did eventually get to the point where I could beat the whole game with no warps, no continues, no cheating and a hell of a lot of 1up's. Mostly from the second stage.

Most people I knew who owned it got stuck on stage 3, the speeder bike stage. They should consider themselves lucky for not making it to the Karnath's Lair. And then there's my most hated level in the game: The Gaia Tubes. Yeah, I nearly smashed my controller from the number of times I ran out of continues on that level.

It short, play this game. I'd love to see a modern day remake of the original BattleToads, all difficulty intact,


Offline Tripe

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #93 on: August 15, 2013, 05:57:31 AM »
#12–The Legend of Zelda: The Ocarina of Time

(62 Points) 5 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #1 – Relaxing Dragon, #1 out of 1 – Tripe H. Redux
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Only game I've ever completed and not become bored with about a quarter of the way through.


Offline Tyrant

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #94 on: August 15, 2013, 06:06:06 AM »
What? Super Metroid all the way up at #19? Whatsa matter with you, Rifftrax people??!!


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #95 on: August 15, 2013, 07:41:02 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/zBzQLCgjkuk" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/zBzQLCgjkuk</a>

The only Metroid game I've played through and beat was the first one, and that was only a couple years ago.  I love Battletoads, as brutal as it was, but I had it a bit lower on my list.

Chrono Trigger showed the 90's was a great time for both RPG games and especially for Squaresoft.  The time travel aspect was really cool and it had a fun epic feel, while at the same time feeling sort of more intimate than the Final Fantasy games (probably due to the smaller cast).

Ocarina of Time was also pretty amazing (and another fun game with a time travel aspect).

NBA Jam and Sonic where great fun, but they didn't make my list.


Offline gojikranz

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #96 on: August 15, 2013, 07:57:10 AM »
Oops I forgot nba jam. I don't even like basketball but that game was awesome.
Sonic one is good but I think we all know sonic 2 tops it in every way.
MICROPHONE MANIAC COMING SOON!!
Promo Featurette: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vzYR6_-UqE


Offline Rainbow Dash

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #97 on: August 15, 2013, 09:56:58 AM »
Sonic the Hedgehog over Ocarina of Time.

You dun failed people.


Offline Thrifty Version II

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #98 on: August 15, 2013, 10:28:25 AM »
NBA Jam was one of the only 2 sports games I ever liked.  The other was Gretzky 3D hockey.  I can't really explain why.


Offline Tripe

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #99 on: August 15, 2013, 10:34:40 AM »
For those that do love OoT there's some jewlery you can buy:



Click the pic for the page.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #100 on: August 15, 2013, 04:27:40 PM »
Entries will be up late tonight because I'm going to catch some silly Starship Troopers thing, but I'm going to try to knock out the entire top 10 when I do.

Friendly Reminder: If you want to host the next list, you have until noon PDT tomorrow, when I'll be posting up the poll.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #101 on: August 16, 2013, 02:26:26 AM »
#10–Super Mario 64

(77 Points) 6 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #2 – Relaxing Dragon
It’s-a ME! Mario!

Release Date:  June 23, 1996

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Super Mario 64 is a platform game, published by Nintendo and developed by its EAD division, for the Nintendo 64. Along with Pilotwings 64, it was one of the launch titles for the console. It was released in Japan on June 23, 1996, and later in North America, Europe, and Australia. Super Mario 64 has sold over eleven million copies.
 
As one of the earlier three dimensional (3D) platform games, Super Mario 64 features free-roaming analog degrees of freedom, large open-ended areas, and true 3D polygons as opposed to two-dimensional (2D) sprites. It established a new archetype for the genre, much as Super Mario Bros. did for 2D sidescrolling platformers. Hailed as "revolutionary", the game left a lasting impression on 3D game design, particularly notable for its use of a dynamic camera system and the implementation of its analog control.
 
In going from two to three dimensions, Super Mario 64 placed an emphasis on exploration within vast worlds that require the player to complete multiple diverse missions, replacing the linear obstacle courses of traditional platform games. While doing so, it managed to preserve many gameplay elements and characters of earlier Mario games. The title is acclaimed by many critics and fans as one of the greatest and most revolutionary video games of all time.

Each course is an enclosed world in which the player is free to wander in all directions and discover the environment without time limits. The worlds are filled with enemies that attack Mario as well as friendly creatures that provide assistance, offer information, or ask a favor (such as pink "peace-loving" Bob-omb Buddies). The player gathers stars in each course; some stars only appear after completing certain tasks, often hinted at by the name of the course. These challenges include defeating a boss, solving puzzles, racing an opponent, and gathering coins. As more stars are collected, more areas of the castle hub world become accessible. The player unlocks doors in the castle with keys obtained by defeating Bowser in special courses. There are many hidden mini-courses and other secrets to the game, most containing extra stars needed to complete the game entirely.
 
Some courses have special cap power-ups which augment Mario's abilities. The Wing Cap allows Mario to fly; the Metal Cap makes him immune to most damage, allows him to withstand wind, walk underwater, and be unaffected by noxious gases; and the Vanish Cap renders him partially immaterial and allows him to walk through some obstacles such as wire mesh, as well as granting invulnerability to some forms of damage. Some courses contain cannons that Mario can access by speaking to a pink Bob-omb Buddy. After entering a cannon, Mario can be shot out to reach distant places. When the player has the Wing Cap equipped, cannons can be used to reach high altitudes or fly across most levels quickly.
 
Mario's abilities in Super Mario 64 are far more diverse than those of previous Mario games. The player can make Mario walk, run, jump, crouch, crawl, swim, climb, kick, or punch using the game controller's analog stick and buttons. Special jumps can be executed by combining a regular jump with other actions, including the double and triple jumps (jumping two and three times in a row, respectively), long jump and backflip. There are also special maneuvers, such as wall jumping; jumping from one wall to another in rapid succession to reach areas that would otherwise be too high. The player can pick up and carry certain items, an ability which is used to solve various puzzles, and swim underwater at various speeds. Mario's life energy slowly diminishes while underwater, representing how long he can hold his breath.

Pak's Thoughts – Who can forget hearing Mario’s canonic voice greeting us for the first time? Or that awesome Easter egg where you can stretch his face? Other platformers would later run it into the ground, but going on a scavenger hunt for all 120 stars was a blast, and it’s still better than many of the imitators that would come years later.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #102 on: August 16, 2013, 02:26:45 AM »
#9–The Secret of Monkey Island

(81 Points) 4 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #4 – ColeStratton
How appropriate! You fight like a cow!

Release Date:  October 1990

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
The Secret of Monkey Island is a 1990 point-and-click graphic adventure game developed and published by Lucasfilm Games. It takes place in a fantastical version of the Caribbean during the age of piracy. The player assumes the role of Guybrush Threepwood, a young man who dreams of becoming a pirate and explores fictional islands while solving puzzles.
 
The game was conceived in 1988 by Lucasfilm employee Ron Gilbert, who designed it with Tim Schafer and Dave Grossman. Gilbert's frustrations with contemporary adventure titles led him to make the player character's death impossible, which meant that gameplay focused the game on exploration. The atmosphere was based on that of the Pirates of the Caribbean theme park ride. The Secret of Monkey Island was the fifth game built with the SCUMM engine, which was heavily modified to include a more user-friendly interface.
 
The Secret of Monkey Island is a 2D adventure game played from a third-person perspective. Via a point-and-click interface, the player guides protagonist Guybrush Threepwood through the game's world and interacts with the environment by selecting from twelve verb commands (nine in newer versions) such as "talk to" for communicating with characters and "pick up" for collecting items between commands and the world's objects in order to successfully solve puzzles and thus progress in the game. While conversing with other characters, the player may choose between topics for discussion that are listed in a dialog tree; the game is one of the first to incorporate such a system. The in-game action is frequently interrupted by cutscenes, non-interactive animated sequences that are used to provide information about character personalities and advance the plot. Like other LucasArts adventure games, The Secret of Monkey Island features a design philosophy that makes the player character's death nearly impossible (Guybrush does drown if he stays underwater for more than ten minutes).

The game's plot, as described by Dave Grossman: “It’s a story about this young man who comes to an island in search of his life’s dream. He’s pursuing his career goals and he discovers love in the process and winds up thinking that was actually more important than what he was doing to begin with. You’re laughing, but there’s actually something deeper going on as well.” When work on the plot began, Gilbert discovered that Schafer's and Grossman's writing styles were too different to form a cohesive whole: Grossman's was "very kind of a dry, sarcastic humor" and Schafer's was "just a little more in your face". In reaction, Gilbert assigned them to different characters and story moments depending on what type of comedy was required. Grossman believed that this benefited the game's writing, as he and Schafer "were all funny in slightly different ways, and it worked well together". Schafer and Grossman wrote most of the dialogue while they were programming the game; as a result, much of it was improvised. Some of the dialogue was based on the designers' personal experiences, such as Guybrush's line "I had a feeling in hell there would be mushrooms", which came from Schafer's own hatred of fungi.

Pak's Thoughts – I try to play through this one once a year, usually around Talk-Like-A-Pirate Day. The pirate atmosphere is so much fun, and the sense of humor is top notch. Guybrush Threepwood is such a great character and LeChuck is a perfect foil.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #103 on: August 16, 2013, 02:27:31 AM »
 
#8–Final Fantasy VI

(93 Points) 5 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #2 – Rainbow Dash
Phooey! Emperor Gesthal's stupid orders! Edgar, you pinhead! Why do you have to live in the middle of a stinking desert?!? These recon jobs are the pits! ...AHEM! There's SAND on my boots!

Release Date:  April 2, 1994

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Final Fantasy VI is a role-playing video game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), released in 1994 for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System as a part of the Final Fantasy series. Set in a fantasy world with a technology level equivalent to that of the Second Industrial Revolution, the game's story focuses on a group of rebels as they seek to overthrow an imperial dictatorship. The game features fourteen permanent playable characters, the most of any game in the main series.
 
It was ported by Tose with minor differences to Sony's PlayStation in 1999 and Nintendo's Game Boy Advance in 2006, and it was released for the Wii's Virtual Console in Japan in March 15, 2011, followed by the PAL region on March 18, 2011 and North America on June 30, 2011. The game was known as Final Fantasy III when it was first released in North America, as the original Final Fantasy III had not been released outside of Japan at the time. However, later localizations used the original title. Final Fantasy VI was the first game in the series to be directed by someone other than producer and series creator Hironobu Sakaguchi; the role was filled instead by Yoshinori Kitase and Hiroyuki Ito. Yoshitaka Amano, a long-time contributor to the Final Fantasy series, returned as the image and character designer, while regular composer Nobuo Uematsu wrote the game's score, which has been released on several soundtrack albums.
 
Released to critical acclaim, Final Fantasy VI was a landmark title for the role-playing genre and is often considered one of the greatest video games of all time. Its Super Nintendo and PlayStation versions have sold over 3.48 million copies worldwide to date as a stand-alone game, as well as over 750,000 copies as part of the Japanese Final Fantasy Collection and the North American Final Fantasy Anthology. Final Fantasy VI has won numerous awards since its release.

Final Fantasy VI features fourteen permanent playable characters, the most of any game in the main series, as well as several secondary characters who are only briefly controlled by the player. The starting character, Terra Branford, is a reserved half-human, half-esper girl who spent most of her life as a slave to the Empire, thanks to a mind-controlling device, and is unfamiliar with love. Other primary characters include Locke Cole, a treasure hunter and rebel sympathizer with a powerful impulse to protect women; Celes Chere, a former general of the Empire, who joined the Returners after being jailed for questioning imperial practices; Edgar Figaro, a consummate womanizer and the king of Figaro, who claims allegiance to the Empire while secretly supplying aid to the Returners; Sabin Rene Figaro, Edgar's brother, who fled the royal court in order to pursue his own path and hone his martial arts skills; Cyan Garamonde, a loyal knight to the kingdom of Doma who lost his family and friends as a result of Kefka poisoning the kingdom's water supply; Setzer Gabbiani, a habitual gambler and thrill seeker; Shadow, a ninja mercenary, who offers his services to both the Empire and the Returners at various stages throughout the game; Relm Arrowny, a young but tough artistic girl with magical powers; Strago Magus, Relm's elderly grandfather and a Blue Mage; Gau, a feral child surviving since infancy in the harsh wilderness known as the Veldt; Mog, a Moogle from the mines of Narshe; Umaro, a savage but loyal sasquatch also from Narshe, talked into joining the Returners through Mog's persuasion; and Gogo, a mysterious, fully shrouded master of the art of mimicry.
 
Most of the main characters in the game hold a significant grudge against the Empire and, in particular, Kefka, who serves as one of the game's main antagonists along with Emperor Gestahl. The supporting character Ultros serves as a recurring villain and comic relief throughout the game. A handful of Final Fantasy VI characters have reappeared in later games, such as Secret of Evermore. Additionally, Final Fantasy SGI, a short tech demo produced for the Silicon Graphics Onyx workstation, featured polygon-based 3D renderings of Locke, Terra, and Shadow.

Pak's Thoughts – Here’s the game that sold the US on Japanese-Style RPGs. There are so many great moments in this game. The discovery of Gau on the Veldt, Celeste’s impromptu opera performance, Ultros’ awesome moustache-twirling villainy, the art gallery… Final Fantasy IV will always be my favorite, but it’s not hard to see why this one is a hot contender for the best Final Fantasy game ever.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #104 on: August 16, 2013, 02:27:57 AM »
#7–Gunstar Heroes

(94 Points) 4 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #1 – Charles Hussein Castle
The Peaceful Planet of Gunstar 9 Has Been Invaded!

Release Date:  September 9, 1993

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Gunstar Heroes is a run and gun video game developed by Treasure and published by Sega. Treasure's debut game was originally released on the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis in late 1993, and later on, ported to the Game Gear by M2.

Gunstar Heroes is a side scrolling shooter. The player has four weapons to choose from, and these four can be combined in pairs to create an additional 10 weapons, for a total of 14. In addition to the weapons, the player can engage enemies in close quarters combat. It is possible to grab and toss enemies, perform sliding and jumping attacks and a long-range skid.
 
Unlike most games in the genre, the player has a life total calculated in numbers. Death to a player requires multiple hits but just one death will issue the option to continue from the start of the level or to end the game. Players have unlimited continues.
 
The main highlight of the game are its boss encounters, which often feature large enemies made up of multiple sprites allowing for fluid movement.

Pak's Thoughts – Here’s a surprise entry to the top 10. Not because it doesn’t deserve it, but because it’s not one of the titles that jumps to mind immediately when one thinks of ‘90s games. This game doesn’t mess around. You fight through a level for just a minute or two and get right to the awesome boss battles. My personal favorite part of the game was the dice maze. I’ve never seen dice used to propel a run-and-gun game before or since.