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Author Topic: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s  (Read 28731 times)

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Offline Raven

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #75 on: August 12, 2013, 09:17:32 PM »
Can't believe I forgot Turtles in Time.  That's one of my all time favorite brawlers.  Had Donkey Kong Country on my list though.


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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #76 on: August 12, 2013, 09:30:19 PM »
I've heard Symphony of the Night is amazing, but I never played any of the Castlevania games except the first, Super Castlevania and the not much liked CastleVania 64.

Donkey Kong Country was an amazingly fun game.  It's one of those games that gives you a wonderful sense of euphoria when you plow through enemies or smash bananas out of the ground.

The early 90's where a great time for the beat-em-ups and I really had to make some hard choices of what to leave off (I think I left the Simpsons arcade off of my list).  The gameplay in Turtles in Time was phenomenal and addicting with lots of shout-outs to the cartoon (and surprisingly obscure monsters and villains).

I like fighting games, but Super Smash Bros really changed things, mixing it with platform gaming and making cool ideas like damage increasing rather than life force depleting, and beating them off the stage rather than just killing them.  So very very fun and it gets better with each game.

Day of the Tentacle is the only LucasArts adventure game I had the pleasure of playing.  And it was great.  Good humour, fun puzzles and a load of personality.  While it lacked the sort of open world non-linear feel of the original Maniac Mansion, it made up for it with overall style and creativity!

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Offline gojikranz

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #77 on: August 12, 2013, 10:01:41 PM »
glad to see the list going well.  some great stuff on here.  Tie Fighter was pretty much my life when we got it.  still love it makes me want to pull out the old joystick and get back in. 

dark forces was also huge we weren't allowed doom but dark forces was apparently appropriate but those dark troopers still scared the shit out of us.

sonic 2 was my favorite as a youngster but i never beat the thing without cheating for many years but when i finally did it was quite satisfying. 

looking forward to the rest!
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Offline Thrifty Version II

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #78 on: August 13, 2013, 03:17:31 AM »
So, can anyone here beat Symphony of the Night without the sword of ultimate bullshit that is the Crissagrim?

Because I sure can't.  I love that sword.
I just used the Alucard Sword.  Symphony of the Night is pretty easy.  It gets a lot tougher when you reach the upside-down castle, but I think that's just because you're sorta underlevelled at that point.  Eventually you learn to maneuver, and you get more HP and durability, and it becomes easier.


Offline CJones

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #79 on: August 13, 2013, 10:51:00 AM »
So, can anyone here beat Symphony of the Night without the sword of ultimate bullshit that is the Crissagrim?

Because I sure can't.  I love that sword.

Oh my God the Crissagrim. I blind played SotN my first time through, so I had no knowledge of this. Got it from a randomn drop by pure luck. Easily one of the most overpowered weapons in video game history. Killed the final boss in about 10 seconds.

And yes, I did later replay the whole game without picking it up.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #80 on: August 14, 2013, 09:24:53 PM »
Let's get this show back on the road!

#20 –Civilization

(56 Points) 3 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #1 - Compound
The fruits of intelligence were many: fire, tools, and weapons, the hunt, farming, and the sharing of food, the family, the village, and the tribe. Now it required but one more ingredient: a great Leader to unite the quarreling tribes to harness the power of the land to build a legacy that would stand the test of time: a CIVILIZATION!

Release Date:  Late 1991

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Sid Meier's Civilization is a turn-based strategy "4X"-type strategy video game created by Sid Meier and Bruce Shelley for MicroProse in 1991. The game's objective is to "Build an empire to stand the test of time." It begins in 4000 BC and the players attempt to expand and develop their empires through the ages from the ancient era until modern and near-future times. It is also known simply as Civilization, or abbreviated to Civ or Civ I.
 
Civilization was originally developed for DOS running on a PC. It has undergone numerous revisions for various platforms (including Windows, Macintosh, Amiga, Atari ST, PlayStation, N-Gage and Super Nintendo) and now exists in several versions. A multiplayer remake, Sid Meier's CivNet was released for the PC in 1995. The N-Gage version was the last game released for the system in North America.

Civilization is a turn-based single- or multiplayer strategy game. The player takes on the role of the ruler of a civilization, starting with only one settler unit and one warrior, and attempts to build an empire in competition with one to eleven other civilizations. The game requires a fair amount of micromanagement (although less than any of the simulation games). Along with the larger tasks of exploration, warfare and diplomacy, the player has to make decisions about where to build new cities, which improvements or units to build in each city, which advances in knowledge should be sought (and at what rate), and how to transform the land surrounding the cities for maximum benefit. From time to time the player's towns may be harassed by barbarians, units with no specific nationality and no named leader. These threats only come from unclaimed land or sea, so that over time there are fewer and fewer places from which barbarians will emanate.
 
Before the game begins, the player chooses which historical or current civilization to play. In contrast to later games in the Civilization series, this is largely a cosmetic choice, affecting titles, city names, musical heralds, and color. The choice does affect their starting position on the "Play on Earth" map, and thus different resources in one's initial cities, but has no effect on starting position when starting a random world game or a customized world game. The player's choice of civilization also prevents the computer from being able to play as that civilization or the other civilization of the same color, and since computer-controlled opponents display certain traits of their civilizations this affects gameplay as well. The Aztecs are both fiercely expansionist and generally extremely wealthy, for example. Other civilizations include the Americans, the Mongols, and Romans. Each civilization is led by a famous historical figure, such as Mohandas K. Gandhi for India.
 
The scope of Civilization is larger than most other games. The game begins in 4000 BC, before the Bronze Age, and can last through to AD 2050 (on the easiest setting) with Space Age and "future technologies". At the start of the game there are no cities anywhere in the world: the player controls one or two settler units, which can be used to found new cities in appropriate sites (and those cities may build other settler units, which can go out and found new cities, thus expanding the empire). Settlers can also alter terrain, build improvements such as mines and irrigation, build roads to connect cities, and later in the game they can construct railroads which offer unlimited movement.
 
As time advances, new technologies are developed; these technologies are the primary way in which the game changes and grows. At the start, players choose from advances such as pottery, the wheel, and the alphabet to, near the end of the game, nuclear fission and spaceflight. Players can gain a large advantage if their civilization is the first to learn a particular technology (the secrets of flight, for example) and put it to use in a military or other context. Most advances give access to new units, city improvements or derivative technologies: for example, the chariot unit becomes available after the wheel is developed, and the granary building becomes available to build after pottery is developed. The whole system of advancements from beginning to end is called the technology tree, or simply the Tech tree; this concept has been adopted in many other strategy games. Since only one tech may be "researched" at any given time, the order in which technologies are chosen makes a considerable difference in the outcome of the game and generally reflects the player's preferred style of gameplay.
 
Players can also build Wonders of the World in each of the epochs of the game, subject only to obtaining the prerequisite knowledge. These wonders are important achievements of society, science, culture and defense, ranging from the Pyramids and the Great Wall in the Ancient age, to Copernicus' Observatory and Magellan's Expedition in the middle period, up to the Apollo program, the United Nations, and the Manhattan Project in the modern era. Each wonder can only be built once in the world, and requires a lot of resources to build, far more than most other city buildings or units. Wonders provide unique benefits to the controlling civilization. For example, Magellan's Expedition increases the movement rate of naval units. Wonders typically affect either the city in which they are built (for example, the Colossus), every city on the continent (for example, the Hanging Gardens), or the civilization as a whole (for example, Darwin's Voyage). Some wonders are made obsolete by new technologies.
 
The game can be won by having the highest score by AD 2050, taking over all other civilizations' capitals, reaching the end of the future era with the highest score, getting the most diplomatic votes, or by winning the space race by reaching the star system of Alpha Centauri.

Meier admits to "borrowing" many of the technology tree ideas from a board game also called Civilization, published in the United Kingdom in 1980 by Hartland Trefoil (later by Gibson Games), and in the United States in 1981 by Avalon Hill. The early versions of the game even included a flier of information and ordering materials for the board game. There is a board game based on the computer game version of Civilization that was published in 2002.

Pak's Thoughts – It was actually the Super Nintendo version of Civilization that introduced me to the series. I rented it from the local video store out of curiosity and immediately knew I’d discovered something special. To this day, when I feel like some nostalgia, I’ll pop the Super Nintendo cartridge in and play for a while. I have to make sure to clear every night for the next few weeks, though, because once I’m in, I can’t walk away for a long time.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #81 on: August 14, 2013, 09:25:21 PM »
#19 –Super Metroid

(57 Points) 3 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #2 - Tyrant
The last Metroid is in captivity. The galaxy is at peace…

Release Date:  March 19, 1994

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Super Metroid is an action-adventure video game and the third game in the Metroid series; the introduction alternatively refers to the game as Metroid 3. It was designed by Nintendo Research & Development 1, programmed by Intelligent Systems, and published by Nintendo for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System video game console. The game was released in Japan on March 19, 1994, in North America on April 18, 1994, and in Europe and Australia on July 28, 1994.
 
Under development for 18 months, Super Metroid was directed and written by Yoshio Sakamoto, and produced by Makoto Kano with Gunpei Yokoi serving as general manager. The game's story follows bounty hunter Samus Aran as she attempts to retrieve a stolen Metroid from the Space Pirates.
 
The game received universal acclaim, earning an aggregated score of 96 percent from Game Rankings, making it the website's ninth highest-rated game. Electronic Gaming Monthly named it the Game of the Month for May 1994, gave it an Editor's Choice Award, awarded it as the Best Action Game of 1994, and named it the Best Game of All Time in 2003. In 2007, IGN ranked Super Metroid seventh in its list of Top 100 Games of All Time. Despite a positive critical reaction, the game sold poorly in Japan, but fared better in North America and Europe. Nevertheless, due to the game's critical success, Nintendo placed it on their Player's Choice marketing label.

Super Metroid is an action-platform game which primarily takes place on the fictional planet Zebes, which is a large, open-ended world with areas connected by doors and elevators. The player controls Samus Aran as she searches the planet for a Metroid that was stolen by Ridley, the leader of the Space Pirates. Along the way, the player collects power-ups that enhance Samus' armor and weaponry, as well as grant her special abilities such as the Space Jump, which allows her to jump infinite times to cover great distances. These abilities allow Samus to access areas that were previously inaccessible.
 
The game introduces several new concepts to the series. Among them are the ability to enable and disable weapons and abilities in an inventory screen, and a Moon Walk ability, named after the popular dance move of the same name, which allows Samus to walk backwards while firing or charging her weapon. The game also features the ability to combine Samus' weapon beams. In addition, the save system from Metroid II: Return of Samus returns in Super Metroid, which allows the player to save and restart the game at any of the save points scattered around the planet, instead of the original title's complex and reverse engineerable password system. The player can also save the game at Samus' gunship, which fully recharges her health and ammunition as well.

Pak's Thoughts – And here’s the other half of the “Metroidvania” term. From the space pirate invasion at the beginning to the epic finale, Super Metroid delights all the senses. I love the music in this game! The instruments all sound so BIG. The open-world exploration is delicious. I also loved the way everything burst into a satisfying slimy explosion.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #82 on: August 14, 2013, 09:25:50 PM »
#18 –Chrono Trigger

(57 Points) 4 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #3 – Rainbow Dash
We have'th our own will! 

Release Date:  March 11, 1995

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Chrono Trigger is a role-playing video game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1995. Chrono Trigger's development team included three designers that Square dubbed the "Dream Team": Hironobu Sakaguchi, the creator of Square's Final Fantasy series; Yuji Horii, a freelance designer and creator of Enix's popular Dragon Quest series; and Akira Toriyama, a freelance manga artist famed for his work with Dragon Quest and Dragon Ball. Kazuhiko Aoki produced the game, Masato Kato wrote most of the plot, while composer Yasunori Mitsuda scored most of the game before falling ill and deferring remaining tracks to Final Fantasy composer Nobuo Uematsu. The game's story follows a group of adventurers who travel through time to prevent a global catastrophe.

Chrono Trigger was a critical and commercial success upon release and is considered today to be one of the greatest video games of all time. Nintendo Power magazine described aspects of Chrono Trigger as revolutionary, including its multiple endings, plot-related sidequests focusing on character development, unique battle system, and detailed graphics.

Chrono Trigger features standard role-playing video game gameplay with several innovations. The player controls the protagonist and his companions in the game's two-dimensional fictional world, consisting of various forests, cities, and dungeons. Navigation occurs via an overworld map, depicting the landscape from a scaled down overhead view. Areas such as forests, cities, and similar places are depicted as more realistic scaled down maps, in which players can converse with locals to procure items and services, solve puzzles and challenges, or encounter enemies. Chrono Trigger's gameplay deviates from that of traditional RPGs in that, rather than appearing in random encounters, many enemies are openly visible on field maps or lie in wait to ambush the party. Contact with enemies on a field map initiates a battle that occurs directly on the map rather than on a separate battle screen.

Chrono Trigger features several other unique gameplay traits, including time travel. Players have access to seven eras of the game world's history, and past actions affect future events. Throughout history, players find new allies, complete side quests, and search for keynote villains. Time travel is accomplished via portals and pillars of light called "time gates", as well as a time machine named Epoch. The game contains thirteen unique endings; the ending the player receives depends on when and how he or she reaches and completes the game's final battle. Chrono Trigger also introduces a New Game+ option; after completing the game, the player may begin a new game with the same character levels, techniques, and equipment, excluding money, with which he or she ended the previous play through. However, certain items central to the storyline are removed and must be found again, such as the sword Masamune. Square has since employed the New Game+ concept in later titles, including Chrono Cross, Parasite Eve, Vagrant Story and Final Fantasy X-2.

Pak's Thoughts – I never quite finished Chrono Trigger. There was nothing wrong with it. In fact, it seemed like some of the best storytelling I’d seen in an RPG up to that point, but I was starting college and the game took a back seat to other things. I can’t deny its charm, though, and really need to play through the DS version I picked up…


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #83 on: August 14, 2013, 09:26:14 PM »
#17 –StarCraft

(57 Points) 5 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #5 – Thrifty Version II
The Zerg have taken everything from me: my home, my family, my friends. I know that nothing I do can bring those things back, but I'll be damned if I just sit on my hands and wait for the end. I want a piece of 'em, all right. I'm in.

Release Date:  March 31, 1998

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
StarCraft is a military science fiction real-time strategy video game developed and published by Blizzard Entertainment and released for Microsoft Windows on March 31, 1998. The game later spawned a franchise, and is the first game of the StarCraft series. Work on the game started shortly after Warcraft II: Tides of Darkness's release in 1995. StarCraft debuted at the 1996 E3, where it was unfavorably compared to Warcraft II; as a result, the project was entirely overhauled and then showcased to public in early 1997, receiving a far more positive response.
 
Set in a fictitious timeline during the Earth's 25th century, the game revolves around three species fighting for dominance in a distant part of the Milky Way galaxy known as the Koprulu Sector: the Terrans, humans exiled from Earth skilled at adapting to any situation; the Zerg, a race of insectoid aliens in pursuit of genetic perfection, obsessed with assimilating other races; and the Protoss, a humanoid species with advanced technology and psionic abilities, attempting to preserve their civilization and strict philosophical way of living from the Zerg.
 
Many of the industry's journalists have praised StarCraft as one of the best and most important video games of all time, and for having raised the bar for developing real-time strategy games. With more than 11 million copies sold worldwide as of February 2009, StarCraft is one of the best-selling games for the personal computer. The game has been praised for pioneering the use of unique factions in real-time strategy gameplay and for a compelling story. StarCraft's multiplayer is particularly popular in South Korea, where players and teams participate in professional competitions, earn sponsorships, and compete in televised tournaments.

Blizzard Entertainment's use of three distinct races in StarCraft is widely credited with revolutionizing the real-time strategy genre. All units are unique to their respective races and while rough comparisons can be drawn between certain types of units in the technology tree, every unit performs differently and requires different tactics for a player to succeed.
 
The enigmatic Protoss have access to powerful units and machinery and advanced technologies such as energy shields and localized warp capabilities, powered by their psionic traits. However, their forces have lengthy and expensive manufacturing processes, encouraging players to follow a strategy of the quality of their units over the quantity. The insectoid Zerg possess entirely organic units and structures, which can be produced quickly and at a far cheaper cost to resources, but are accordingly weaker, relying on sheer numbers and speed to overwhelm enemies. The Terrans provide a middle ground between the other two races, providing units that are versatile and flexible. They have access to a range of more ballistic military technologies and machinery, such as tanks and nuclear weapons.
 
Although each race is unique in its composition, no race has an innate advantage over the other. Each species is balanced out so that while they have different strengths, powers, and abilities their overall strength is the same. The balance stays complete via infrequent patches (game updates) provided by Blizzard.
 
StarCraft features artificial intelligence which scales in difficulty, although the player cannot change the difficulty level in the single-player campaigns. Each campaign starts with enemy factions running easy AI modes, scaling through the course of the campaign to the hardest AI modes. In the level editor provided with the game, a designer has access to four levels of AI difficulties: "easy", "medium", "hard" and "insane", each setting differing in the units and technologies allowed to an AI faction and the extent of the AI's tactical and strategic planning. The single-player campaign consists of thirty missions, split into ten for each race.
 
Pak's Thoughts – Here’s a game with so much staying power you can still go to your local Wal-Mart and pick up a copy! It’s everything I love about Warcraft wrapped in a Sci-Fi setting with an awesome soundtrack to back it up. I never got into the multiplayer game, but I’ve watched my brother “Zerg-Rush” many an unsuspecting opponent.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #84 on: August 14, 2013, 09:26:42 PM »
#16 –Super Mario Kart

(58 Points) 3 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #1 – Raven
Where racing becomes an adventure!

Release Date:  August 27, 1992

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Super Mario Kart is a 1992 go-kart racing video game developed by Nintendo EAD for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES). The first game of the Mario Kart series, it was launched in Japan on August 27, 1992, in North America on September 1, 1992, and in Europe on January 21, 1993. Selling eight million copies worldwide, the game went on to become the third best selling SNES game of all time.
 
In Super Mario Kart the player takes control of one of eight Mario series characters, each with differing capabilities. In single player mode players can race against computer controlled characters in multi-race cups over three difficulty levels. During the races, offensive and speed boosting power-ups can be used to gain an advantage. Alternatively players can race against the clock in a Time Trial mode. In multi-player mode two players can simultaneously take part in the cups or can race against each other one-on-one in Match Race mode. In a third multiplayer mode – Battle Mode – the aim is to defeat the other players by attacking them with power-ups, destroying balloons which surround each kart.
 
Super Mario Kart received positive reviews and has been praised for its presentation, innovation and use of Mode 7 graphics. It has been ranked among the best games of all time by several organizations including Edge, IGN, The Age and GameSpot, while Guinness World Records has named it as the top console game ever. It is often credited with creating the kart-racing sub-genre of video games, leading other developers to try to duplicate its success. The game is also seen as having been key to expanding the Mario series into non-platforming games. This diversity has led to it becoming the best-selling game franchise of all time.

During the game, players take control of one of eight Mario franchise characters and drive karts around tracks with a Mario franchise theme. In order to begin racing and battling, Lakitu will come in with the traffic light hanging on a fishing pole, which starts the countdown. When the light turns green, the race or battle officially begins. During a race, the player's viewpoint is from behind his or her kart. The goal of the game is to either finish a race ahead of other racers, who are controlled by the computer and other players, or complete a circuit in the fastest time. There is also a battle mode in which the aim is to attack the karts of the other human players.
 
Tiles marked with question marks are arrayed on the race tracks; they give special abilities (power-ups) to a player's kart if the vehicle passes over them. Power-ups, such as the ability to throw shells and bananas, allow racers to hit others with the objects, causing them to spin and lose control. A kart that obtains the star power-up is temporary invulnerable to attack. Computer players have specific special powers associated with each character, that they are able to use throughout the race. Lines of coins are found on the tracks in competitive race modes. By running over these coins, a kart collects them and increases its top speed. Having coins also helps players when their kart is hit by another: instead of spinning and losing control, they lose a coin. Coins are also lost when karts are struck by power-ups or fall off the tracks.
 
The game features advanced maneuvers such as power sliding and hopping. Power sliding allows a kart to maintain its speed while turning, although executing the maneuver for too long causes the kart to spin. Hopping helps a kart execute tighter turns: the kart makes a short hop and turns in the air, speeding off in the new direction when it lands.
 
Pak's Thoughts – I devoured this game when it came out. I know intellectually that the game only gets improved each time a sequel comes out, but none of them have ever been able to top the original in my mind.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #85 on: August 14, 2013, 09:27:21 PM »
#15 –Battletoads

(59 Points) 4 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #3 - Monty
I haven't seen such a dismal failure since the last time you failed!

Release Date:  June 1991

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Battletoads is a platformer video game created by Tim and Chris Stamper and developed by Rare as the first installment of the Battletoads series. It was originally released for the Nintendo Entertainment System in 1991.
 
Battletoads is arguably one of the most graphically advanced video games ever released for the NES, at a time when the video game market was turning to the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis and Super Nintendo Entertainment System. The game became famous for its extreme difficulty and humorous ways of beating enemies, as during finishing attacks, the character's body parts transform into gigantic, exaggerated appendages for devastating attacks and comic effect.
 
The levels of Battletoads vary in gameplay style. Most prominent are "beat-em-up" levels that appear as either traditional side-scrolling stages or as isometric platforming stages, in which the players progress by defeating enemies. The players can finish off enemies in special ways, such as punching or kicking with an enlarged fist or boot, or by transforming into a wrecking ball.
 
In obstacle course and race levels, the character must dodge a series of obstacles while driving or flying at high speed, or outrun an enemy that can instantly kill a player's character. Other levels include a climbing/jumping "snake maze", an underwater level with lethal spikes and dangerous monsters, and two "tower climb" levels.
 
There are four "warp points" hidden in various levels that, when found, allow the player to automatically advance by two levels. The players start with three lives each time the game is started or continued after receiving a game over.

Pak's Thoughts – I bought into the advance hype for this game and had my allowance saved up for it on opening day. Yes, it’s as brutally hard as they say, but I never regretted the purchase. I could never beat it, but hours upon hours of play helped me memorize that darned speed-bike stage. I don’t know if I’d be able to do it today, though.

Hey! Wanna see the worst thing you’ve ever seen?
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Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #86 on: August 14, 2013, 09:27:39 PM »
#14–Doom

(60 Points) 4 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #7 – Tejava Joe
Besides, someone was gonna pay for what happened to Daisy, your pet rabbit.

Release Date:  December 10, 1993

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Doom (typeset as DOOM in official documents) is a 1993 science fiction horror-themed first-person shooter video game by id Software. It is considered one of the most significant and influential titles in the video game industry, for having ushered in the popularity of the first-person shooter genre. The game is divided into three nine-level episodes. The Ultimate Doom, an updated release of the original game featuring a fourth episode, was released in 1995.
 
In Doom, players assume the role of a space marine, who became popularly known as "Doomguy", fighting their way through hordes of invading demons from Hell. With one third of the game, nine levels, distributed as shareware, Doom was played by an estimated 10 million people within two years of its release, popularizing the mode of gameplay and spawning a gaming subculture. It is widely known as one of the most important video games of all time for having popularized the first-person shooter genre, pioneering immersive 3D graphics, networked multiplayer gaming, and support for customized additions and modifications via packaged files in a data archive known as "WADs". As a sign of its effect on the industry, first-person shooter games from the genre's boom in the 90s, helped in no less part by the game's release, became known simply as "Doom clones". Its graphic and interactive violence however, as well as its satanic imagery, also made it the subject of considerable controversy.
 
Once the game's source code was released in 1997, it spawned even more adaptations, as fans further ported the code to countless devices. The series started to lose mainstream appeal as the technology of the Doom game engine was surpassed in the mid-1990s, although fans have continued making WADs, speedruns, and modifications to the original.

Being a first-person shooter, Doom is experienced through the eyes of the main character. This character is not named throughout the game. The game's designer, John Romero, has pointed out that this is so the player feels more involved in the game: "There was never a name for the DOOM marine because it's supposed to be you." At its core, the gameplay is similar to classic shooter games (such as Space Invaders), presenting the player with the challenge of surviving while shooting every enemy in sight, but with its pseudo-3D first-person perspective giving environments a spatial representation that has a major effect on the level design and gameplay experience.
 
In order for the game to be completed, the marine must fight through Phobos, Deimos, and then Hell itself, each presented as an episode containing eight distinct levels, along with an optional ninth hidden level for each one. The Ultimate Doom, the retail store version of the game, adds a fourth episode, Thy Flesh Consumed. Set between the end of Doom and before Doom II, this episode was developed by independent level designers with id's approval, and was designed for expert Doom players seeking a major challenge (being considerably more difficult than the original episodes).
 
The objective of each level is simply to locate the exit room that leads to the next area, marked with an exit sign and/or a special kind of door, while surviving all hazards on the way. Among the obstacles are demonic monsters, pits of toxic or radioactive slime, ceilings that lower and crush anything below them, and locked doors for which require a keycard, skull-shaped key device, or remote switch must be located. The levels are sometimes labyrinthine and feature plenty of items such as additional ammo, health increases and other "power-ups" along the way, as well as the occasional secret areas which are not immediately obvious as a reward for players who explore more carefully. To ease navigation through the levels, a full screen automap is available and shows the areas explored to that point. Many versions of Doom (and its sequels) include secret levels which are accessed by the player discovering alternate exits, often hidden behind secret doors, hidden passageways, or in areas which are difficult to reach.

Pak's Thoughts – I only ever played through the Shareware demo. To this day, the first person shooter is my Achilles heel. I just can’t get a mental map of the area in my head and end up going back and forth between 2 or 3 rooms. I get the appeal, though. Blowing away hordes of demons with all manner of weaponry is always a good time.


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #87 on: August 14, 2013, 09:28:01 PM »
#13–NBA Jam

(61 Points) 5 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #9 – Monty
Boomshakalaka!

Release Date:  1993

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
NBA Jam is a basketball arcade game developed by Midway in 1993. It is the first entry in the NBA Jam series. The main designer and programmer for this game was Mark Turmell. Midway had previously released such sports games as Arch Rivals in 1989, High Impact in 1990, and Super High Impact in 1991. The gameplay of NBA Jam is based on Arch Rivals, another 2-on-2 basketball video game. However, it was the release of NBA Jam that brought mainstream success to the genre.
 
The game became exceptionally popular, and generated a significant amount of money for arcades after its release, creating revenue of $1 billion in quarters.
 
The release of NBA Jam gave rise to a new genre of sports games which were based around fast, action-packed gameplay and exaggerated realism, a formula which Midway would also later apply to the sports of football (NFL Blitz), and hockey (2 on 2 Open Ice Challenge).

NBA Jam, which featured 2-on-2 basketball, is one of the first real playable basketball arcade games, and is also one of the first sports games to feature NBA-licensed teams and players, and their real digitized likenesses.
 
A key feature of NBA Jam is the exaggerated nature of the play - players jump many times above their own height, making slam dunks that defy both human capabilities and the laws of physics. There are no fouls, free throws, or violations except goaltending and 24-second violations. This meant the player is able to freely shove or elbow his opponent out of the way. Additionally, the game has an "on fire" feature, where if one player makes three baskets in a row, he becomes "on fire" and has unlimited turbo and has increased shooting precision. The "on fire" mode continues until the other team scores, or until the player who is on fire scores 4 additional consecutive baskets while "on fire."
 
The game is filled with easter eggs, special features and players activated by initials or button/joystick combinations. For example, pressing A five times and right five times on any Sega Genesis controller would activate "Super Clean Floors". This feature would cause characters to fall if they ran too fast or changed direction too quickly. And players can enter special codes to unlock hidden players, ranging from US President Bill Clinton to Hugo the Charlotte Hornets mascot. Early versions of the sequel, NBA Jam Tournament Edition, allows players to put in codes that allow people to play as characters from Mortal Kombat, but the NBA, uneasy over the controversies surrounding Mortal Kombat's levels of violence, forced Midway to remove these characters in later updates. On the arcade machine, there is also a hidden 'tank' game that allows you to run around a 3D wireframe field. In order to access this mode however, you were required to be able to toggle the on/off switch located behind the machine. While the game was powering back on, you would hold Up + all buttons on player 1 and Down + all buttons on player 2.

Pak's Thoughts – NBA Jam was a blast. I don’t like Sports Games, but this one cut out all of the rules and technicalities of the game until it became something fun to play. I probably had more fun playing with the cheat codes and secret characters than I did playing the game. If you’ve never seen Al Gore somersault into the air and slam dunk a basketball, you haven’t lived!


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #88 on: August 14, 2013, 09:28:35 PM »
#12–The Legend of Zelda: The Ocarina of Time

(62 Points) 5 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #1 – Relaxing Dragon, #1 out of 1 – Tripe H. Redux
Hey! Listen!

Release Date:  1993

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time is an action-adventure video game developed by Nintendo's Entertainment Analysis and Development division for the Nintendo 64 video game console. It was released in Japan on November 21, 1998; in North America on November 23, 1998; and in Europe on December 11, 1998. Originally developed for the Nintendo 64DD peripheral, the game was instead released on a 256-megabit (32-megabyte) cartridge, which was the largest-capacity cartridge Nintendo produced at that time. Ocarina of Time is the fifth game in The Legend of Zelda series, and the first with 3D graphics.
 
The player controls the series' trademark hero, Link, in the land of Hyrule. Link sets out on a quest to stop Ganondorf, King of the Gerudo tribe, from obtaining the Triforce, a sacred relic that grants the wishes of its holder. Link travels through time and navigates various dungeons to awaken sages who have the power to seal Ganondorf away forever. Music plays an important role—to progress, the player must learn to play and perform several songs on an ocarina. The game was responsible for generating an increased interest in and rise in sales of the ocarina.
 
Ocarina of Time's gameplay system introduced features such as a target lock system and context-sensitive buttons that have since become common elements in 3D adventure games. In Japan, it sold over 820,000 copies in 1998, becoming the tenth-best-selling game of that year. During its lifetime, Ocarina of Time sold 1.14 million copies in Japan and over 7.6 million copies worldwide. The game won the Grand Prize in the Interactive Art division at the Japan Media Arts Festival, won six honors at the 2nd Annual Interactive Achievement Awards, and received an overwhelmingly positive critical reception. The title is widely considered by critics and gamers alike to be the greatest video game ever made. In 2008 and 2010, Guinness World Records declared that Ocarina of Time is the highest-rated game ever reviewed.
 
Ocarina of Time is an action-adventure game with role-playing and puzzle elements. The player controls Link from a third-person perspective, in a three-dimensional space. Link primarily fights with a sword and shield, but he can also use other weapons such as projectiles, bombs, and magic spells. Much of the game is spent in battle, but some parts require the use of stealth. Exploration is another important aspect of gameplay; the player may notice inaccessible areas and return later to find them explorable after obtaining a new item, such as the bomb, to blast open doors, or the hookshot, to reach far places.

Link gains new abilities by collecting items and weapons found in dungeons or in the overworld. Ocarina of Time has several optional side-quests, or minor objectives that the player can choose to complete or ignore. Completing the side-quests usually results in rewards, normally in the form of weapons or abilities. In one side-quest, Link trades items he cannot use himself among non-player characters. This trading sequence features ten items and ends with Link receiving an item he can use, the two-handed Biggoron Sword, the largest and strongest sword in the game. In another side-quest, Link can acquire a horse named Epona. This allows him to travel faster, but attacking while riding is restricted to arrows.[31] In order to get Epona, Link must learn her song while he is a child. However, he is only able to ride her when he and Epona are both adults.
 
Link is given the Fairy Ocarina near the beginning of the game, which is later replaced by the Ocarina of Time, given to him by Princess Zelda. Throughout the game, Link learns twelve melodies that allow him to solve various puzzles and teleport to previously visited locations in the game. The Ocarina of Time is also used to claim the Master Sword in the Temple of Time. When Link takes the sword, he is sealed for seven years, until he becomes an adult, and therefore strong enough to wield the Master Sword. Young Link and adult Link have different abilities. For example, only adult Link can use the Fairy Bow and only young Link can fit through certain small passages. After completing the Forest Temple, Link can travel freely between the two time periods by replacing or taking the sword. The melodies and notes are played with the "C" and "A" buttons on the Nintendo 64 controller or the C analogue stick on the GameCube controller.

Pak's Thoughts – I never quite made it through Ocarina of Time. I have some of the same problems I have with 3D shooters. I’m never quite sure where I am in space and time. I’m getting better, though and every time I play through I make it closer to the end. Maybe picking up the 3DS remake will eliminate some of my spatial relationship problems…


Offline Pak-Man

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Re: LoC 73 - Top 50 Video Games of the '90s
« Reply #89 on: August 14, 2013, 09:28:57 PM »
#11–Sonic the Hedgehog

(64 Points) 5 of 16 Lists - Highest Ranking – #8 - Monty
Super Speed! Super Graphics! Super Attitude!

Release Date:  June 23, 1991

Just the facts/Stuff I wiki'd:
Sonic the Hedgehog is a platform video game developed by Sonic Team and published by Sega for the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis. First released in North America, Europe, and Australia on June 23, 1991, the game is the first installment in the Sonic the Hedgehog series, chronicling the adventures of the titular character in his quest to defeat the series' antagonist Dr. Robotnik. The game's story focuses on Sonic's efforts to stop Dr. Robotnik's plans for world domination, release the animals Dr. Robotnik has trapped, and collect six magical emeralds known as the Chaos Emeralds.
 
Development of Sonic the Hedgehog began in 1990, when Sega ordered its AM8 development team to develop a game featuring a mascot for the company. After a hedgehog was decided on as the main character, the development group was renamed Sonic Team.
 
Sonic the Hedgehog received positive reviews from critics, who praised the game's visuals and its sense of speed. It was commercially successful, increasing the popularity of the Mega Drive/Genesis and establishing Sonic the Hedgehog as the company's mascot. Its success led to the development of subsequent games in the Sonic the Hedgehog series, as well as the creation of a media franchise of spin-off products featuring the character.

The game is split up into zones, each of which is split into three acts. The player must navigate through each zone to progress. At the end of each zone's third act, the player confronts Dr. Robotnik, who pilots a vehicle, in a boss fight with a theme unique to that zone. After completing the sixth zone, the player continues directly to the Final Zone for the last encounter with Robotnik. The player is given a certain number of lives, which are lost when Sonic collides with hazardous enemies or objects, falls off-screen, or exceeds an act's ten-minute time limit. If all lives are lost at any point in the game, the "Game Over" screen will appear, at which point the player can return to the beginning of the act with three lives if the player obtains continues from Special Stages.
 
The game plays as a 2D side-scrolling platformer. The gameplay centers around Sonic's ability to run at high speed through levels that include springs, slopes, high falls, and loop-the-loops. The levels are populated with hazards in the form of animals Dr. Robotnik has trapped inside mechanical bodies (named "badniks" in the Western game manuals). The player must also avoid rows of sharp spikes, bottomless pits, and other obstacles. Sonic's main means of attack is the Spin Attack, in which he curls into a ball and rotates rapidly, damaging enemies and certain obstacles upon collision. This can be performed by jumping in the air or by pressing down on the D-Pad while moving on the ground.

Sonic the Hedgehog added the element of momentum-based physics to the standard platform formula and introduced other unique elements as well, such as the loops, springboards, high-speed devices, and the rings, which are permanently associated with the series. While the speed contributed to the mix, the execution of the platforming element influenced the development of various 2D video games, including a subsequent wave of similar "mascot-based platforming games", such as Bubsy, Aero the Acrobat, Ristar, Earthworm Jim, and many others.

Pak's Thoughts – In the early days of the great console wars, I refused to play any Sega games at all, so it would take me a few years to learn Sonic’s charm, but I can’t deny it, now. This game epitomizes ‘90s ‘tude in all the right ways.

All caught up! Tune in tomorrow as we begin the Top 10!