Author Topic: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists  (Read 27725 times)

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Offline goflyblind

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Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
« Reply #45 on: September 24, 2012, 02:26:15 PM »
29


Tony Stark

45 points - 4 lists - Highest Position: 1 (ScottotD)

Portrayed By: Robert Downey Jr. (film), Adrian Pasdar (animated series), Adrian Petriw (animated series), Eric Lewis (animated series)

Short Biography

Tony Stark is a character in the Marvel Universe. He is a billionaire and a multi-field genius. Tony the son of wealthy industrialist and head of Stark Industries. After his parents are killed in a plane accident, he inherits his father's company. While observing the effects of his experimental technologies on the American war effort, Tony Stark is injured by a booby trap and captured by the enemy led by Wong-Chu, who then orders him to design weapons. However, Stark's injuries are dire and shrapnel is moving towards his heart. His fellow prisoner, Ho Yinsen, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist whose work Stark had greatly admired during college, constructs a magnetic chest plate to keep the shrapnel from reaching Stark's heart, keeping him alive. In an attempt to stop other people from misusing his designs, Stark goes about disabling other armored heroes and villains who are using suits based on the Iron Man technology, the designs of which were stolen by his enemy Spymaster. His quest to destroy all instances of the stolen technology severely hurts his reputation as Iron Man. Tony Stark is an inventive genius whose expertise in the fields of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and computer science rivals that of Reed Richards, Hank Pym, and Bruce Banner, and his expertise in electrical engineering and mechanical engineering surpasses even theirs. He is regarded as one of the most intelligent characters in the Marvel Universe. He graduated with advanced degrees in physics and engineering at the age of 17 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Major Discovery

Stark uses his personal fortune not only to outfit his own armor, but also to develop weapons for S.H.I.E.L.D. and other technologies such as the Quinjets used by the Avengers, and the image inducers used by the X-Men. Later on, Stark expands on his armor designs and begins to build his arsenal of specialized armors for particular situations such as for stealth and space travel. Iron Man possesses powered armor that gives him superhuman strength and durability, flight, and an array of weapons. The armor is invented and worn by Stark. In addition to the general-purpose model he wears, Stark has developed several specialized suits for space travel, deep-sea diving, stealth, and other special purposes. The most recent models of Stark's armor, beginning with the Extremis Armor, are now stored in the hollow portions of Stark's bones, and the personal area networking implement used to control it is implanted in his forearm, and connected directly to his central nervous system. At one point, Stark's armor becomes sentient despite fail-safes to prevent its increasingly sophisticated computer systems from doing so. Initially, Stark welcomes this "living" armor for its improved tactical abilities. However, the armor begins to grow more aggressive, killing indiscriminately and eventually desiring to replace Stark altogether. In the final confrontation on a desert island, Stark suffers another heart attack. The armor sacrifices its own existence to save its creator's life, giving up essential components to give Stark a new, artificial heart.




Up Next (Tomorrow): Science Frauds! And then, glayvin!
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Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
« Reply #46 on: September 24, 2012, 04:35:41 PM »
30 (tie)


Peter Venkman
Not the Ghostbuster I picked... mostly because the one I picked actually knew about the science he proclaimed to know.

29


Tony Stark

45 points - 4 lists - Highest Position: 1 (ScottotD)

Not one of my super-hero picks, but a fine choice nonetheless.
33


Max Planck
Definitely one of the ones, along with Tycho Brahe, that I'd like to read more about.  I know the name, but I admit, I know little about his accomplishments aside from being namechecked in sci-fi.

32


Michael Faraday
So how long was he Michael?


Offline goflyblind

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Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
« Reply #47 on: September 24, 2012, 04:38:26 PM »
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Johnny Unusual

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Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
« Reply #48 on: September 24, 2012, 05:37:02 PM »


Offline goflyblind

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Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
« Reply #49 on: September 25, 2012, 10:46:32 AM »
Wait a minute, that's not right...

Science is a human endeavour. As such, it can be subject to human errors. The wonderful thing about it, though, is that it is usually self-correcting. Scientists are always testing previous knowledge to ensure that it holds up to all available evidence. When something is found to be blatantly wrong, it is dismissed from the collection of scientific knowledge. Sometimes, though, everyone wants something to be true so badly that they ignore rational thought and objective evidence and celebrate the wrong answer. With that in mind, I give you some of the Most Interesting Scientific Frauds.

The first one was sent in by three people: The Piltdown Man (1912) was presented as a set of fossilized remains, intended to show that the earliest form of human life began in England, rather than in Africa. It was not discovered as a forgery until forty years later, though its veracity was in doubt from the very beginning. The bones were apparently given to Charles Dawson, though the identity of the forger is still in question. The fossil itself consisted of three distinct parts: the skull of a medieval human, the lower jaw bone of an orang-utan, and fossilized chimpanzee teeth.

"Archaeoraptor" is the generic name informally assigned in 1999 to a fossil from China in an article published in National Geographic magazine. The magazine claimed that the fossil was a "missing link" between birds and terrestrial theropod dinosaurs. Even prior to this publication there had been severe doubts about the fossil's authenticity. It led to a scandal when evidence demonstrated it to be a forgery through further scientific study. The forgery was constructed from rearranged pieces of real fossils from different species. Zhou et al. found that the head and upper body actually belong to a specimen of the primitive fossil bird Yanornis. A 2002 study found that the tail belongs to a small winged dromaeosaur, Microraptor, named in 2000. The legs and feet belong to an as yet unknown animal. The scandal brought attention to illegal fossil deals conducted in China. It also highlighted the need for close scientific scrutiny of purported "missing links" published in journals which are not peer-reviewed. The fossil scandal has been used by creationists to cast doubt on evolutionary theory. Although "Archaeoraptor" was a forgery, many true examples of feathered dinosaurs have been found and demonstrate the evolutionary connection between birds and other theropods.

Andrew Wakefield was an English surgeon and medical researcher. He led a study that purported to show a link between the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine and autism. Since then, the paper has been shown to be false, and was withdrawn from publication. However, the idea caught on and has led to a decrease in the number of people (children especially) who are vaccinated, causing outbreaks of the diseases worldwide. A very good summary of the story (in comic strip form) is given at: http://tallguywrites.livejournal.com/148012.html

The next three instances all have to do with one thing: press conferences. In these cases, scientists are either too excited by their supposed discovery, or flat out lying. Cold fusion is the room-temperature nuclear fusion that was supposed to produce vast amounts of energy with very little input energy. It gained attention after reports in 1989 by Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann, then one of the world's leading electrochemists, that their apparatus had produced anomalous heat ("excess heat"), of a magnitude they asserted would defy explanation except in terms of nuclear processes. Many scientists tried to replicate the experiment with the few details available. Hopes fell with the large number of negative replications, the withdrawal of many positive replications, the discovery of flaws and sources of experimental error in the original experiment, and finally the discovery that Fleischmann and Pons had not actually detected nuclear reaction byproducts. The lead scientist on a study that could overturn the Big Bang decided to tell the world, through interviews and press release, that the Universe didn't start with a Big Bang, it started with a big chill. The paper discussing the result comes to no such grandiose conclusion, and none of the journalists reporting the story seemed to notice the difference. A good summary of the divergence is given here. Most recently, a study was produced that found that GMO crops cause cancer in mice. Again, though, we have a case where the scientists involved went to the press first, without letting others in their field properly examine the results. A nice summary of the dustup is given here.

This last fraud is more a case of a practical joke that went on too long rather than anything malicious, but the event is still somewhat troubling. The Sokal affair involves a publishing hoax perpetrated by Alan Sokal, a physicist who studies the interplay between statistical mechanics and quantum field theory. In 1996, Sokal published a paper titled "Transgressing the Boundaries: Towards a Transformative Hermeneutics of Quantum Gravity" in Social Text, which proposed that quantum gravity is a social and linguistic construct. On its date of publication, Sokal revealed in Lingua Franca (a magazine about intellectual and literary life in academia) that the article was a hoax, identifying it as "a pastiche of Left-wing cant, fawning references, grandiose quotations, and outright nonsense . . . structured around the silliest quotations [by postmodernist academics] he could find about mathematics and physics". The resultant academic and public quarrels concerned the scholarly merit, or lack thereof, of humanistic commentary about the physical sciences; the influence of postmodern philosophy on social disciplines in general; academic ethics, including whether Sokal was right or wrong to deceive the editors and readers of Social Text; and whether the journal had exercised the appropriate intellectual rigor before publishing the pseudoscientific article. In 1996, Social Text did not conduct peer review because its editors believed that an editorial open policy would stimulate more original, less conventional research. The editors argued that, in that context, Sokal's article was a fraudulent betrayal of their trust. Moreover, they further argued that scientific peer review does not necessarily detect intellectual fraud and other instances of published poor science. After the Sokal Hoax, Social Text established an article peer review process.


And now, back to the (hopefully) good scientists, mmm-whai!
« Last Edit: September 25, 2012, 10:51:43 AM by goflyblind »
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Offline goflyblind

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Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
« Reply #50 on: September 25, 2012, 10:47:03 AM »
27 (tie)


John Frink

47 points - 3 lists - Highest Position: 5 (Gunflyer)

Portrayed By: Hank Azaria (animated series)

Short Biography

John Frink is a fictional scientist in the animated series The Simpsons. He is generally depicted as Springfield's stereotypical nerdy, mad, and socially inept scientist, inventor, and mathematician. Frink is a college professor at Springfield Heights Institute of Technology and runs his own astronomical observatory. In the 1960s, Professor Frink made napalm to drop on Da Nang. He once predicted that computers would be so large and so expensive that only the five richest kings of Europe would own them.


Major Discoveries

While Professor Frink acts as a consultant on all matters scientific, his main pursuit is that of inventor. Among his most interesting inventions are:
 - Hamburger Earmuffs
 - Gamble-Tron 2000
 - Radio-Controlled Aeroplane for Babies
 - Run Away House
 - 77X42 Super Sour Ball
 - Intra-Bovine Ice Cream Maker
 

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ggXmKPMaHMo" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ggXmKPMaHMo</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/SB2_MvK3yEg" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/SB2_MvK3yEg</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/dRSCp3tYdZk" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/dRSCp3tYdZk</a>


Up Next: Surely, this next entry must be joking!
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Offline goflyblind

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Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
« Reply #51 on: September 25, 2012, 10:47:35 AM »
27 (tie)


Richard Feynman

47 points - 3 lists - Highest Position: 2 (goflyblind)

Short Biography

Richard Feynman was an American theoretical physicist and computer scientist. Feynman was a late talker; by his third birthday he had yet to utter a single word. The young Feynman was heavily influenced by his father, who encouraged him to ask questions to challenge orthodox thinking. During his graduate education, he decided to take a biology class, and had to present on the anatomy of a cat. Not knowing the proper term for an anatomical chart, he asked the librarian if they had "a map of a cat." His first seminar was attended by Henry Russell, Einstein, Pauli, and von Neumann, something that would probably make me faint. Once, while feeling frustrated with and burned out on physics, he was ready to give up on research and simply teach physics and read Arabian Nights for the rest of his life. All it took to get him back into the fold was a wobbling plate, thrown in the Cornell cafeteria. He noted that the logo on the plate spun around the plate faster than the wobble, and decided to calculate the exact expression that described the relation between the logo and the plate. At the Manhattan Project, Feynman was sought out by physicist Niels Bohr for one-on-one discussions. He later discovered the reason: most of the other physicists were too in awe of Bohr to argue with him. Feynman had no such inhibitions, vigorously pointing out anything he considered to be flawed in Bohr's thinking. Feynman said he felt as much respect for Bohr as anyone else, but once anyone got him talking about physics, he would become so focused he forgot about social niceties.


Major Discoveries

Feynman made so many contributions to physics and mathematics (like von Neumann) that it makes all physics students rather frustrated and sad. At the Manhattan Project, Feynman was in charge of the (human and mechanical) computer division. When the project started using and IBM punch-card computer, he devised a way of parallelizing calculations so they could be performed much more quickly. Feynman's Nobel Prize work was in the field of quantum electrodynamics, which describes the interaction of photons with electrons. His most impressive contribution to scientific knowledge would have to be the combination of the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics (a generalization of the action formulation of classical mechanics) and Feynman diagrams (diagrams used as short-hand for particle interactions). Feynman diagrams themselves present possibly the most elegant notation in all of science, giving a very visual representation of the ways in which particles interact. Partly as a way to bring publicity to progress in physics, Feynman offered $1000 prizes for two of his challenges in nanotechnology, claimed by William McLellan and Tom Newman, respectively. He was also one of the first scientists to conceive the possibility of quantum computers. Feynman played an important role on the Presidential Rogers Commission, which investigated the Challenger disaster. During a televised hearing, Feynman demonstrated that the material used in the shuttle's O-rings became less resilient in cold weather by immersing a sample of the material in ice-cold water. The commission ultimately determined that the disaster was caused by the primary O-ring not properly sealing due to extremely cold weather at Cape Canaveral.


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/lytxafTXg6c" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/lytxafTXg6c</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/iMDTcMD6pOw" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/iMDTcMD6pOw</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/zSZNsIFID28" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/zSZNsIFID28</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/wLaRXYai19A" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/wLaRXYai19A</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/_MmpUWEW6Is" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/_MmpUWEW6Is</a>


Up Next: Turns out, this next scientist isn't the centre of the Universe.
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Offline goflyblind

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Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
« Reply #52 on: September 25, 2012, 10:47:58 AM »
26


Nicolaus Copernicus

51 points - 4 lists - Highest Position: 7 (lassieface)

Short Biography

Nicolaus Copernicus was a Polish astronomer active in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Copernicus began his studies at the University of Kraków in the heyday of the Kraków astronomical-mathematical school, acquiring the foundations for his subsequent mathematical achievements. Copernicus' four years at Kraków played an important role in the development of his critical faculties and initiated his analysis of the logical contradictions in the two most popular systems of astronomy—Aristotle's theory of homocentric spheres, and Ptolemy's mechanism of eccentrics and epicycles—the surmounting and discarding of which constituted the first step toward the creation of Copernicus' own doctrine of the structure of the universe.  Despite urgings from many quarters, Copernicus delayed publication of his book, perhaps from fear of criticism—a fear delicately expressed in the subsequent dedication of his masterpiece to Pope Paul III. Scholars disagree on whether Copernicus' concern was limited to possible astronomical and philosophical objections, or whether he was also concerned about religious objections. Legend has it that the first printed copy of De revolutionibus was placed in his hands on the very day that he died, allowing him to take farewell of his life's work. He is reputed to have awoken from a stroke-induced coma, looked at his book, and then died peacefully.


Major Discovery

Copernicus' major contribution to science was a comprehensive heliocentric model of the Universe. Though he wasn't the first to come up with the idea, he did provide a more compelling and complete model than had come previously. Copernicus held that the Earth is another planet revolving around the fixed sun once a year, and turning on its axis once a day. But while Copernicus put the Sun at the center of the celestial spheres, he did not put it at the exact center of the universe, but near it. Copernicus' system used only uniform circular motions, correcting what was seen by many as the chief inelegance in Ptolemy's system. Unfortunately, his reliance on circular motion meant that he had to introduce epicycles (smaller circular orbits around the larger circular orbit) and his model ended up still being quite complicated. Despite this, however, his model was sufficiently detailed and well-argued that it was the first heliocentric model that was seriously considered by European scientists. Unfortunately again, this did not come until over a hundred and fifty years after his death and required the contributions of Galileo, Kepler, and Newton to bring about widespread acceptance.


Up Next: This next scientist showed us that we're all peas in a pod. At least, I think that's what he meant.
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Offline goflyblind

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Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
« Reply #53 on: September 25, 2012, 10:48:16 AM »
25


Gregor Mendel

53 points - 4 lists - Highest Position: 5 (Pak-Man)

Short Biography

Gregor Mendel was a nineteenth century Silesian friar and biologist. He is viewed as the father of modern genetics. During his childhood, Mendel worked as a gardener and studied beekeeping. He studied practical and theoretical philosophy as well as physics at the University of Olomouc.


Major Discovery

Gregor Mendel, who is known as the "father of modern genetics", was inspired by both his professors at the University of Olomouc and his colleagues at the monastery to study variation in plants, and he conducted his study in the monastery's experimental garden. Between 1856 and 1863 Mendel cultivated and tested some twenty-nine thousand pea plants. This study showed that one in four pea plants had purebred recessive alleles, two out of four were hybrid and one out of four were purebred dominant. His experiments led him to make two generalizations, the Law of Segregation and the Law of Independent Assortment, which later became known as Mendel's Laws of Inheritance. Mendel's work was rejected at first, and was not widely accepted until after he died. During his own lifetime, most biologists held the idea that all characteristics were passed to the next generation through blending inheritance, in which the traits from each parent are averaged together. Instances of this phenomenon are now explained by the action of multiple genes with quantitative effects. Charles Darwin tried unsuccessfully to explain inheritance through a theory of pangenesis. It was not until the early 20th century that the importance of Mendel's ideas was realized. The combination of Mendelian genetics with Darwin's theory of natural selection resulted in the modern synthesis of evolutionary biology.


Up Next: Always respect the chemistry.
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Offline goflyblind

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Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
« Reply #54 on: September 25, 2012, 10:48:42 AM »
24


Walter White

54 points - 3 lists - Highest Position: 5 (Cole Stratton)

Portrayed By: Bryan Cranston (television)

Short Biography

Walter White is a fictional character and the main protagonist of the American television drama series Breaking Bad. Once a promising chemist who was one of the founding members of the fictional "Gray Matter Technologies", Walter left the company for personal reasons and became an unhappy and disillusioned high school chemistry teacher. After being diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer, he resorts to manufacturing methamphetamine to ensure his family's financial security when he dies. As the series progresses, Walter gradually becomes dangerous and takes on a more villainous role.


Major Discoveries

As a graduate student at Caltech, Walt contributed to research that helped a team win a Nobel Prize in Chemistry. After graduate school, Walter founded the firm Gray Matter Technologies with Elliott Schwartz, his former classmate and close friend, though he secretly feels that his work was stolen from him and bitterly blames Elliott for his lot in life. Walt's main scientific achievement, beyond the unspecified research for Gray Matter Technologies, is his ultra-pure blue crystal meth. Thanks to his expert knowledge in chemistry and increasingly powerful underworld investors, he is able to scale production to vast amounts, effectively (and sometimes literally) killing the competition.


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/sGN3SBVIjjA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/sGN3SBVIjjA</a>

Spoiler: this one's a bit gory (click to show/hide)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/_wkYoQZRFKk" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/_wkYoQZRFKk</a>

Can we embed Dailymotion clips? I can't find the actual flash file from here: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xtbinx_cbp_shortfilms


Up Next: Such a big forehead for a physicist! Must be where he absorbs all the brain power from those around him.
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Offline goflyblind

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Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
« Reply #55 on: September 25, 2012, 10:49:07 AM »
23


Niels Bohr

59 points - 3 lists - Highest Position: 4 (lassieface)

Short Biography

Niels Bohr was a Danish physicist in the early- to mid-nineteenth century. Bohr mentored and collaborated with many of the top physicists of the century at his institute in Copenhagen. He was part of the British team of physicists working on the Manhattan Project. In 1903, Bohr enrolled as an undergraduate at Copenhagen University, initially studying philosophy and mathematics. In 1905, prompted by a gold medal competition sponsored by the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, he conducted a series of experiments to examine the properties of surface tension, using his father's laboratory in the university, familiar to him from assisting there since childhood. His essay won the prize, and it was this success that decided Bohr to abandon philosophy and adopt physics (apparently money and prizes are all it takes for someone to become a physicist). The Bohr–Einstein debates were a series of public disputes about quantum mechanics between Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr, who were two of its founders. Their debates are remembered because of their importance to the philosophy of science. Despite their differences of opinion regarding quantum mechanics, Bohr and Einstein had a mutual admiration that was to last the rest of their lives.


Major Discovery

Bohr's greatest contribution to science is his model of the atom, which describes electrons as held to discrete orbits around the atom's nucleus. Working from this, he further described how the chemical properties of an element are determined by the electrons in the outermost orbit. He also developed the Copehagen Interpretation of quantum mechanics, which says that quantum mechanics does not represent the true state of a system, but describes only probabilities associated with the wave function of various states. This interpretation does suffer some defects, mostly notably the requirement of an "observer" (something which collapses the wave function, like interaction with another particle), but has been wildly successful at describing how much of quantum mechanics works. It did, however, lead to some nice quips, with Einstein's saying "I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice." and "Do you really think the moon isn't there if you aren't looking at it?", while Bohr, in response, said "Einstein, don't tell God what to do."


Up Next: I want to say one word to you. Just one word. Are you listening? Ellipses.
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Offline goflyblind

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Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
« Reply #56 on: September 25, 2012, 10:49:28 AM »
22


Johannes Kepler

61 points - 5 lists - Highest Position: 6 (Imrahil, lassieface)

Short Biography

Johannes Kepler was an astronomer from the 16th and 17th centuries. He was born in 1571 in Weil der Stadt. His work began by publishing in favour of the heliocentric model, using a geometric argument that the orbits of the planets corresponded to various regular polygons. He worked for Tycho Brahe, from who he learned the importance of meticulous record-keeping in astronomical observation. Upon Brahe's death, Kepler stole those records and used them in his greatest scientific achievement. In addition to being an astronomer and mathematician, Kepler had to defend his mother on charges of witchcraft.


Major Discovery

Kepler's major contribution to scientific knowledge was the realization that the orbits of planets around the sun were not circular, as had been assumed up to that point, but were in fact elliptical. Despite working for Brahe, he was unable to reconcile a geocentric model of the Universe with the observations in Brahe's data. Kepler made two more discoveries with regards to planetary motion: a line joining the planet with the sun sweeps out equal areas during equal time intervals; and the square of the orbital period of a planet is directly proportional to the cube of the semi-major axis of its orbit. Kepler further made detailed observations of a supernova, determining that it must be further than any of the planets, and the Rudolphine Tables which provide tables of planet and star positions.


Up Next: Our next entry keeps getting confused with his creation. I'll bet Mr. Kleenex knows how he feels.
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Offline goflyblind

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Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
« Reply #57 on: September 25, 2012, 10:50:06 AM »
21


Victor Frankenstein

64 points - 6 lists - Highest Position: 8 (Kete)

Portrayed By: Colin Clive (film), Peter Cushing (film), Donald Pleasence (film), Kenneth Branagh (film), and many others

Short Biography

Victor Frankenstein is a fictional character, the protagonist of the 1818 novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, written by Mary Shelley. He is a scientist who, after studying chemical processes and the decay of living beings, gains an insight into the creation of life and gives life to his own creature. While many subsequent film adaptations have portrayed Frankenstein as the prototypical "mad scientist", the novel portrayed him as a tragic figure. As a young man, Frankenstein is interested in the works in alchemists such as Cornelius Agrippa, Paracelsus, and Albertus Magnus, and he longs to discover the fabled elixir of life. He loses interest in both these pursuits and in science as a whole after seeing the remains of a tree struck by lightning; however, at the University of Ingolstadt, Frankenstein develops a fondness for chemistry, and becomes obsessed with the idea of creating life in inanimate matter through artificial means, leaving university to pursue this goal for the next two years. Assembling a humanoid creature perhaps by the use of a chemical, apparatus or a combination of both, Frankenstein successfully brings it to life, but he is suddenly horrified by his actions as it awakens. He abandons and flees his creation, who disappears and soon embarks upon a journey of vengeance that results in the death of Frankenstein's younger brother, William. The creature approaches Frankenstein and begs him to create a female companion for him; Frankenstein agrees, but ultimately destroys this creation, aghast at the idea of a race of monsters. Frankenstein pursues the "fiend" or "daemon" (as he calls his creation) to the Arctic with the intent of destroying it; he ultimately fails in his mission, as he falls through an ice floe and contracts severe pneumonia. He is rescued by a ship undergoing an expedition to the North Pole, but dies after relating his tale to the ship's captain, Robert Walton. His creature, upon discovering the death of its creator, is overcome by sorrow and vows to commit suicide by burning himself alive in "the Northernmost extremity of the globe"; he then disappears, never to be seen or heard from again.


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/8H3dFh6GA-A" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/8H3dFh6GA-A</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/HZ-OrfJHHro" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/HZ-OrfJHHro</a>


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Offline ColeStratton

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Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
« Reply #58 on: September 25, 2012, 11:41:59 AM »
I didn't have Victor...

Same here...

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Offline goflyblind

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Re: LoC #64: Top 52 Scientists
« Reply #59 on: September 25, 2012, 11:49:53 AM »
im, you didn't have any incarnation of frankenstein. ??? but thanks for giving me a minor heart attack. :)
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