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Author Topic: List Of Crap#60 Countdown - Top Comedic Actors & Actresses (Possibly NSFW clips)  (Read 40452 times)

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Offline wurwolf

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Lazy and safe isn't funny to me, no matter who is speaking. I think that's the problem I have with a lot of comedians, female or not.
Bonhead #2
fs!!



Offline Kete

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I like it when they make faces and talk in funny voices.


Offline pegaso220379

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I didn't get time to make a list, and wanted to, but I'm liking what is done so far.


Offline Darth Geek

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I like it when they make faces and talk in funny voices.
And fart noises. Fart noises are always funny. And when it's a woman doing them, it's funny AND edgy.



Offline Tripe

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Plus surreal, cause women don't fart.


Coragale

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Let me clarify my position on women and them being funny. Women comedians CAN be funny; they just take a lot longer to get to the funny part of the joke, and by that point, it's not funny anymore.


Offline Mrs. Dick Courier

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Chapelle's Show was great.  When I first saw commercials I had written it off.  Oh, a dumb looking car commercial, a crackhead character.  Looks like a retread of In Living Color stuff, which was never very good.  But, man, I finally gave the show a chance and it was great.  Chapelle is very funny and has a ton of charisma.  In a way, I'm kind of glad that if he had to leave it was Calvin and Hobbes style: at the top of his game.  True, it means that there's some great stuff we'll never see from him, but what he left behind was damn fine.  Oh, and some mediocre movies, but that was before he hit his stride, so we'll forgive those.

Sadly, the sketch is aged a bit in the sense that barely anyone remembers Wayne Brady, but even forgetting that, this is a brilliant piece of dark comedy.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/zkwTzy7T_Lw" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/zkwTzy7T_Lw</a>

EDIT:
Number 47
(26 points, on 2 of 16 lists - Top Vote #10 by Pak-Man)
Robin Williams

No.  No, thank you.

I love Wayne Brady, still watch my taped reruns of Whose Line on a regular basis (that reminds me, I forgot Colin Mochrie for my list...damn it!)

And I can't believe Betty White came in so low, I've loved her since the Golden Girls and fell back in love with the reruns of Match Game on GSN
Opticians are easy on the eyes


Offline Mrs. Dick Courier

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I thought of Dave Chapelle, but he didn't make my top 25.

Didn't even think of Robin Williams, he's made some pretty funny movies
Opticians are easy on the eyes


Offline Johnny Unusual

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I like it when they make faces and talk in funny voices.

Yeah, I like Maria Bamford too.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/8K6q7bIdid4" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/8K6q7bIdid4</a>


MontyServo

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Number 45
(26 points, on 3 of 16 lists - Top Vote #10 by George Harrison)
Charlie Chaplin


My thoughts:
Really surprised he ranked this low.  Of course, I didn't have him on my list so that didn't help.  I really need to see more of his work.

The Wiki:
Sir Charles Spencer "Charlie" Chaplin, KBE (16 April 1889 – 25 December 1977) was an English comic actor, film director and composer best known for his work during the silent film era. He became the most famous film star in the world before the end of World War I. Chaplin used mime, slapstick and other visual comedy routines, and continued well into the era of the talkies, though his films decreased in frequency from the end of the 1920s. His most famous role was that of The Tramp, which he first played in the Keystone comedy Kid Auto Races at Venice in 1914. From the April 1914 one-reeler Twenty Minutes of Love onwards he was writing and directing most of his films, by 1916 he was also producing them, and from 1918 he was even composing the music for them. With Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks and D. W. Griffith, he co-founded United Artists in 1919.

Chaplin was one of the most creative and influential personalities of the silent-film era. He was influenced by his predecessor, the French silent film comedian Max Linder, to whom he dedicated one of his films. His working life in entertainment spanned over 75 years, from the Victorian stage and the music hall in the United Kingdom as a child performer, until close to his death at the age of 88. His high-profile public and private life encompassed both adulation and controversy. Chaplin was identified with left-wing politics during the McCarthy era and he was ultimately forced to resettle in Europe from 1952.

In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Chaplin the 10th greatest male screen legend of all time. In 2008, Martin Sieff, in a review of the book Chaplin: A Life, wrote: "Chaplin was not just 'big', he was gigantic. In 1915, he burst onto a war-torn world bringing it the gift of comedy, laughter and relief while it was tearing itself apart through World War I. Over the next 25 years, through the Great Depression and the rise of Adolf Hitler, he stayed on the job. ... It is doubtful any individual has ever given more entertainment, pleasure and relief to so many human beings when they needed it the most". George Bernard Shaw called Chaplin "the only genius to come out of the movie industry".

The clip:
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/xoKbDNY0Zwg?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/xoKbDNY0Zwg?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>



MontyServo

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Number 44
(27 points, on 3 of 16 lists - Top Vote #16 by Imrahil)
Tina Fey


My thoughts:
I used to think the world of Tina Fey, especially when she was on SNL. And I really liked her on 30 Rock at first.  Now I can't wait for that show to end so she moves on to a different project because her character really grates on me.  I like her and think she is genuinely funny, but would rather see her doing other things.

The Wiki:
Elizabeth Stamatina "Tina" Fey (born May 18, 1970) is an American actress, comedian, writer and producer, known for her work on the NBC sketch comedy series Saturday Night Live (SNL), the NBC comedy series 30 Rock, and films such as Mean Girls (2004) and Baby Mama (2008).

Fey first broke into comedy as a featured player in the Chicago-based improvisational comedy group The Second City. She then joined SNL as a writer, later becoming head writer and a performer, known for her position as co-anchor in the Weekend Update segment. In 2004 she adapted the screenplay Mean Girls in which she also co-starred. After leaving SNL in 2006, she created the television series 30 Rock, a situation comedy loosely based on her experiences at SNL. In the series, Fey portrays the head writer of a fictional sketch comedy series. In 2008, she starred in the comedy film Baby Mama, alongside former SNL co-star Amy Poehler. Fey next appeared in the 2010 comedy films Date Night and Megamind.

She has received seven Emmy Awards, three Golden Globe Awards, four Screen Actors Guild Awards, four Writers Guild of America Awards and has been nominated for a Grammy Award for her autobiographical book Bossypants, which topped the The New York Times Best Seller list for five weeks. She was singled out as the performer who had the greatest impact on culture and entertainment in 2008 by the Associated Press, which gave her its AP Entertainer of the Year award for her satirical portrayal of Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin in a guest appearance on SNL. In 2010, Fey was the recipient of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor, the youngest-ever winner of the award.

The clip:
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/OMFZ31YKLu8?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/OMFZ31YKLu8?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

« Last Edit: June 04, 2012, 02:40:53 PM by Monty »


Offline Johnny Unusual

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Not a big Chaplin fan for the most part.  Some stuff is phenomenal (Modern Times), some is just OK (the Kid) and then there's some really weak stuff that stretches what should be a comedic jumping off point into 14 minutes of nothing; I don't even remember the name of the short, but it's basically the Tramp mixing up who's piano he's supposed to take away and who's he's supposed to deliver and that's about it.  For 14 minutes.  Like, not even the consequences are shown.  I mean, there's a subplot about how sad it is if one family loses the piano and the Tramp not taking it away saves them, but it feels like there's not enough context for... anything.


MontyServo

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Number 43
(28 points, on 2 of 16 lists - Top Vote #6 by George Harrison)
Peter Cook


My thoughts:
Not really familiar with his work.  I have seen Bedazzled, but it was a long time ago.  I may have to check out more of his work.  Any recommendations?

The Wiki:
Peter Edward Cook (17 November 1937 – 9 January 1995) was an English satirist, writer and comedian. An extremely influential figure in modern British comedy, he is regarded as the leading light of the British satire boom of the 1960s. Cook has been described by Stephen Fry as "the funniest man who ever drew breath", although his work was also controversial. Cook was closely associated with anti-establishment comedy which emerged in Britain and the United States in the late 1950s.

The clip:
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/_Z8AddFYCnA?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/_Z8AddFYCnA?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

« Last Edit: June 04, 2012, 02:57:52 PM by Monty »


Offline Kete

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That image of Peter Cook is odd.  You know what it reminds me of?:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)


MontyServo

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Number 42
(29 points, on 2 of 16 lists - Top Vote #4 by Wurwolf)
John C. Reilly


My thoughts:
Really funny actor.  I loved him in Boogie Nights.  And his Steve Brule stuff is just bizarre and funny.

The Wiki:
John Christopher Reilly, Jr. (born May 24, 1965) is an American film and theater actor, singer, and comedian. Debuting in Casualties of War in 1989, he is one of several actors whose careers were launched by Brian De Palma. To date, he has appeared in more than fifty films, including three separate films in 2002 that were all nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. He has been nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role in Chicago and a Grammy Award for the song "Walk Hard", which he performed in Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story. Reilly currently stars in Check It Out! with Dr. Steve Brule, a television show on Adult Swim.

The clip:
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/xWXjkvc--EM?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/xWXjkvc--EM?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>