Author Topic: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!  (Read 108626 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26112
  • Liked: 5135
  • Mr. Robot
Re: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!
« Reply #30 on: May 11, 2012, 09:41:40 PM »

 #38 Little Nemo in Slumberland
45 Points, 3 lists, #3 George Harrison   

The strip was first called Little Nemo in Slumberland and then In the Land of Wonderful Dreams when it changed papers. A brief revival of the original title occurred from 1924-27.
   
The original set-up of the comic revolved around the nightly dreams of a little boy named Nemo (meaning "nobody" in Latin). The purpose of his early dreams was to reach 'Slumberland', the realm of King Morpheus, who wanted him as a playmate for his daughter, the Princess. The last panel in each strip was always one of Nemo waking up, usually in or near his bed, and often being scolded (or comforted) by one of the grownups of the household after crying out in his sleep and waking them. In the earliest strips, the dream event that woke him up would always be some mishap or disaster that seemed about to lead to serious injury or death, such as being crushed by giant mushrooms, being turned into a monkey, falling from a bridge being held up by "slaves", or gaining 90 years in age. Later on, when Nemo finally did reach Slumberland, he was constantly being woken up by Flip, a character who originally wore a hat that had 'Wake Up' written on it. Flip would go on to be one of the comic's seminal characters. Other notable recurring characters included: Dr. Pill, The Imp, the Candy Kid and Santa Claus as well as the Princess and King Morpheus.

Although a comic strip, it was far from a simple children's fantasy; it was often dark, surreal, threatening, and even violent.

 
 Animated Adaptation:
Yeah, but I wouldn’t recommend it:
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/pGAt0GQ703U" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/pGAt0GQ703U</a>

 Trivia:
In children's literature, Maurice Sendak has said that this strip inspired his book In the Night Kitchen, and William Joyce included several elements from Little Nemo in his children's book Santa Calls, including appearances by Flip and the walking bed.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2012, 09:47:05 PM by Johnny Unusual »


Offline Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26112
  • Liked: 5135
  • Mr. Robot
Re: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!
« Reply #31 on: May 11, 2012, 09:46:23 PM »
Oops, sorry Asbestos.  I almost missed one.  You an unlike and like if you want.


Offline Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26112
  • Liked: 5135
  • Mr. Robot
Re: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!
« Reply #32 on: May 11, 2012, 09:46:37 PM »

 #37 Krazy Kat
45 Points, 4 lists, #10 George Harrison   

Krazy Kat is an American comic strip created by cartoonist George Herriman, published daily in newspapers between 1913 and 1944. It first appeared in the New York Evening Journal, whose owner, William Randolph Hearst, was a major booster for the strip throughout its run. The characters had been introduced previously in a side strip with Herriman's earlier creation, The Dingbat Family. The phrase "Krazy Kat" originated there, said by the mouse by way of describing the cat. Set in a dreamlike portrayal of Herriman's vacation home of Coconino County, Arizona, Krazy Kat's mixture of offbeat surrealism, innocent playfulness and poetic, idiosyncratic language has made it a favorite of comics aficionados and art critics for more than 80 years.

The strip focuses on the curious love triangle between its title character, a guileless, carefree, simple-minded cat of indeterminate gender (referred to as both "he" and "she"); the obsessive antagonist Ignatz Mouse; and the protective police dog, Offissa Bull Pupp. Krazy nurses an unrequited love for the mouse. However, Ignatz despises Krazy and constantly schemes to throw bricks at Krazy's head, which Krazy misinterprets as a sign of affection, uttering grateful replies such as "Li'l dollink, allus f'etful". Offissa Pupp, as Coconino County's administrator of law and order, makes it his unwavering mission to interfere with Ignatz's brick-tossing plans and lock the mouse in the county jail.

Despite the slapstick simplicity of the general premise, it was the detailed characterization, combined with Herriman's visual and verbal creativity, that made Krazy Kat one of the first comics to be widely praised by intellectuals and treated as "serious" art. Art critic Gilbert Seldes wrote a lengthy panegyric to the strip in 1924, calling it "the most amusing and fantastic and satisfactory work of art produced in America today." Poet E. E. Cummings, another Herriman admirer, wrote the introduction to the first collection of the strip in book form. Though only a modest success during its initial run, in more recent years, many modern cartoonists have cited Krazy Katas a major influence.
 

 Animated Adaptation:
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/FCK288kGXow" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/FCK288kGXow</a>



 Trivia:
While Chuck Jones' Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner shorts, set in a similar visual pastiche of the American Southwest, are among the most famous cartoons to draw upon Herriman's work, Krazy Kat has continued to inspire artists and cartoonists to the present day. Patrick McDonnell, creator of the current strip Mutts and co-author of Krazy Kat: The Comic Art of George Herriman, cites it as his "foremost influence." Bill Watterson of Calvin and Hobbes fame named Krazy Kat among his three major influences (along with Peanuts and Pogo). Watterson would revive Herriman's practice of employing varied, unpredictable panel layouts in his Sunday strips. Charles M. Schulz and Will Eisner both said that they were drawn towards cartooning partly because of the impact Krazy Kat made on them in their formative years. Bobby London's Dirty Duck was styled after Krazy Kat.
 


Offline Asbestos Bill

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1956
  • Liked: 458
  • Are YOU dedoodaydolah?
    • QuipTracks
Re: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!
« Reply #33 on: May 11, 2012, 09:50:48 PM »
Yay. Krazy Kat. And these are great writeups too. Though, to nitpick, it's not 100% fair to say that Ignatz "despises" Krazy...it's a complicated love-hate relationship that I don't think either of them fully understand. There are several strips where the two seem to feel a destiny bond that draws them together—it's just that Ignatz can only express him/herself through baked clay to the head.

Oops, sorry Asbestos.  I almost missed one.  You an unlike and like if you want.

I like that one too :D
« Last Edit: May 11, 2012, 09:54:10 PM by Asbestos Bill »


Offline Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26112
  • Liked: 5135
  • Mr. Robot
Re: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!
« Reply #34 on: May 11, 2012, 09:52:33 PM »
I wish I could take credit for the write ups.  It's basically somewhat edited wiki-stuff.  But I am proud of my comic choices.


Offline Asbestos Bill

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1956
  • Liked: 458
  • Are YOU dedoodaydolah?
    • QuipTracks
Re: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!
« Reply #35 on: May 11, 2012, 09:54:39 PM »
I wish I could take credit for the write ups.  It's basically somewhat edited wiki-stuff.  But I am proud of my comic choices.

Ah, well then good job on the comic choices ;)

Oh, and you have both authors' names wrong. Little Nemo is by Winsor McCay and Krazy Kat is George Herriman
« Last Edit: May 11, 2012, 10:05:55 PM by Asbestos Bill »


Offline Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26112
  • Liked: 5135
  • Mr. Robot
Re: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!
« Reply #36 on: May 11, 2012, 10:00:14 PM »

#36 Spy Vs Spy
45 points, 4 lists, #6 Johnny Unusual   


Spy vs. Spy is a black and white comic strip that debuted in Mad magazine #60, dated January 1961, and was originally published byEC Comics. The strip was created by Antonio Prohías.

The Spy vs. Spy characters have featured in media such as animated television series, merchandise such as action figures and trading cards, and video games.

 Prohías was a prolific cartoonist in Cuba and known for political satire. Prohías' parodies of newly-installed Cuban dictator Fidel Castro attracted criticism, and faced with the loss of work, possible arrest and threats of execution, he fled to the United States on May 1, 1960 – 3 days before Castro took over the last of the Cuban free press. Prohías sought work in his profession and travelled to the offices of MAD Magazine in New York City on July 12, 1960. After a successful showing of his work and a prototype cartoon for Spy vs. Spy, Prohías was hired.

Prohías completed a total of 241 strips for MAD Magazine, the last appearing in Issue #269 (March 1987). He cryptically 'signed' each strip on its first panel with a sequence of Morse code characters that spell "BY PROHIAS". During an interview with the Miami Herald in 1983, Prohías reflected on his career, stating "The sweetest revenge has been to turn Fidel's accusation of me as a spy into a moneymaking venture." However, Prohías was censored by MAD Magazine publisher William Gaines on at least one occasion. The strip that eventually appeared in MAD Magazine #84 (Jan. 1964) was altered as the Spies were depicted as drinking and smoking, and Gaines had a strong anti-smoking stance.

Prohías eventually retired due to ill health, and died aged 77 on February 24, 1998. The strips continued, with writer Duck Edwing and artist Bob Clarke creating the majority. As of MAD Magazine #356 (April 1997), Peter Kuper took over as writer and artist for the strip.

The comic strip always features two spies, who are completely identical save for the fact that one is dressed in white and the other black. The pair are constantly warring with each other, using a variety of booby-traps to inflict harm on the other. The spies usually alternate between victory and defeat with each new strip.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Art Spiegelman noted that "Getting published is very important to a young cartoonist, and I somehow have Antonio Prohias to thank for helping kick off my career."
 
Animated Adaptation:
Briefly on Mad TV and to a much greater effect on MAD (the cartoon)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ww56yoRoiww" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ww56yoRoiww</a>


Trivia:
In MAD Magazine #73 (Sept. 1962), the strip was renamed Spy vs. Spy vs. Spy, as it was the debut of a third spy, the "Lady in Grey" (or the Grey Spy). The Grey Spy only appeared sporadically, but always triumphed, using the infatuation of the Black and White spies to her advantage. Prohías stated "The lady Spy represented neutrality. She would decide for the white or black Spy, and she also added some balance and variety to the basic 'Spy vs. Spy' formula." The Grey Spy's last appearance in the magazine comics was MAD Magazine #99  (Dec. 1965).



Offline mattwnelson

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1856
  • Liked: 543
    • Catbeard the Pirate!
Re: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!
« Reply #37 on: May 11, 2012, 10:01:56 PM »
Am I the only one who actually likes the Little Nemo movie? I thought its somewhat disjointed narrative fit the dream setting perfectly, and the animation is sharp. It's by no means perfect, but it's nowhere near as bad as so many make it out to be. I remember that a short while back, the Nostalgia Critic did one of his usual satirical reviews of the film, and instead of the usual effect, it just reminded me of how much I liked it and I ended up buying it on Amazon. It does, however, have a cover which very much belongs in the Bad DVD Artwork thread.

As a comics enthusiast, I'm kind of dreading what's going to come up at the top of this list. If Little Nemo, Krazy Kat and Tintin are this far down, I fear what's higher (though there are other good ones out there, to be sure).


Offline Asbestos Bill

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1956
  • Liked: 458
  • Are YOU dedoodaydolah?
    • QuipTracks
Re: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!
« Reply #38 on: May 11, 2012, 10:05:02 PM »
As a comics enthusiast, I'm kind of dreading what's going to come up at the top of this list. If Little Nemo, Krazy Kat and Tintin are this far down, I fear what's higher (though there are other good ones out there, to be sure).

The fact that we have 45point entries this low means the top ones will have to have a lot of consensus, which makes me nervous for most of my entries.


Offline Asbestos Bill

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1956
  • Liked: 458
  • Are YOU dedoodaydolah?
    • QuipTracks
Re: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!
« Reply #39 on: May 11, 2012, 10:06:58 PM »
Oh, and you have both authors' names wrong. Little Nemo is by Winsor McCay and Krazy Kat is George Herriman

Okay now I feel stupid. I was reading George Harrison's name and thinking that was the author. D'oh.


Offline Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26112
  • Liked: 5135
  • Mr. Robot
Re: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!
« Reply #40 on: May 11, 2012, 10:40:02 PM »
As a comics enthusiast, I'm kind of dreading what's going to come up at the top of this list. If Little Nemo, Krazy Kat and Tintin are this far down, I fear what's higher (though there are other good ones out there, to be sure).

Well, maybe you should have voted.  Just sayin'.  There are comics I would have like to see higher but felt that I know these comics mostly through reputation than reading them.  I think the Spirit might have gotten much higher if I read more.

Hagar the Horrible was a weird entry in the list in that it's highest vote got it 7 points.  I think we all accept Hagar isn't that good, but it's familiar and harmless.


Offline gojikranz

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1135
  • Liked: 23
  • im baaaack
    • my facebook?
Re: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!
« Reply #41 on: May 12, 2012, 12:02:32 AM »
Close to Home seems like an awkward, impotent Far Side

Agreed though they are sporadically good.  i might have added it in place of some of my lower ones if i had thought of it though.


The Grey Spy's last appearance in the magazine comics was MAD Magazine #99  (Dec. 1965).


this is certainly wrong because i have seen the grey spy in magazines in my lifetime (and i was born in the 80's) excuse my nit picking.  gotta love spy vs spy.  i remember a sega game though i can't recall the game play at all.

here is all the board members favorite band genesis doing a song about little nemo

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/nlvfnJzSJ0o" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/nlvfnJzSJ0o</a>
MICROPHONE MANIAC COMING SOON!!
Promo Featurette: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vzYR6_-UqE


Offline mattwnelson

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1856
  • Liked: 543
    • Catbeard the Pirate!
Re: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!
« Reply #42 on: May 12, 2012, 12:03:03 AM »
As a comics enthusiast, I'm kind of dreading what's going to come up at the top of this list. If Little Nemo, Krazy Kat and Tintin are this far down, I fear what's higher (though there are other good ones out there, to be sure).

Well, maybe you should have voted.  Just sayin'.  There are comics I would have like to see higher but felt that I know these comics mostly through reputation than reading them.  I think the Spirit might have gotten much higher if I read more.

Hagar the Horrible was a weird entry in the list in that it's highest vote got it 7 points.  I think we all accept Hagar isn't that good, but it's familiar and harmless.

I don't keep track of the lists, for the most part. I just happened to see this one on the main page. I think I've only participated twice.

...just sayin'.


Offline Johnny Unusual

  • The Efron
  • ****
  • Posts: 26112
  • Liked: 5135
  • Mr. Robot
Re: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!
« Reply #43 on: May 12, 2012, 12:12:07 AM »
The Grey Spy's last appearance in the magazine comics was MAD Magazine #99  (Dec. 1965).


this is certainly wrong because i have seen the grey spy in magazines in my lifetime (and i was born in the 80's) excuse my nit picking.  gotta love spy vs spy.  i remember a sega game though i can't recall the game play at all.

I have too, but are you sure it was in a fresh MAD and not on of their countless reprint specials (or was simply reprinted in a new magazine).  Or perhaps the writer misspoke and meant that the Gray Spy being used in the title was taken out of it and was relegated to sporadic appearances.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2012, 12:14:42 AM by Johnny Unusual »


Offline gojikranz

  • Not Hurt By Pain
  • ******
  • Posts: 1135
  • Liked: 23
  • im baaaack
    • my facebook?
Re: List of Crap 59: Top 50 Comic Strips Countdown!
« Reply #44 on: May 12, 2012, 12:24:25 AM »
The Grey Spy's last appearance in the magazine comics was MAD Magazine #99  (Dec. 1965).


this is certainly wrong because i have seen the grey spy in magazines in my lifetime (and i was born in the 80's) excuse my nit picking.  gotta love spy vs spy.  i remember a sega game though i can't recall the game play at all.

I have too, but are you sure it was in a fresh MAD and not on of their countless reprint specials (or was simply reprinted in a new magazine).  Or perhaps the writer misspoke and meant that the Gray Spy being used in the title was taken out of it and was relegated to sporadic appearances.

pretty sure they were new not that i would know it was after the magazine went to color though so i imagine they weren't reprinting and colorizing.

but ya the name thing might be the point it was still spy vs spy.
MICROPHONE MANIAC COMING SOON!!
Promo Featurette: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vzYR6_-UqE